Tag Archives: Roberto Firmino

No Penalty, No Points, But No Shame

Meeting Javi

My Journey to the game was rather more eventful than I was expecting as an incident further up the line meant that my train into London stopped at Feltham.  As there were buses heading to Hatton Cross, that seemed the best bet and a bus and four different tube trains later I arrived in Watford.  It is a testament to how early I leave for games that I was still in the West Herts by 12:30.

Talk before the game was mostly about the Fans’ Forum that had taken place during the week.  It had been a superb event.  It started with a presentation by Spencer Field, Global Strategy and Partnerships Director(!), about the efforts they were making to bring Watford to a global audience, one of which will entail a change to the badge.  This was greeted with some dismay although I assume those that thought it was a good idea remained quiet.  Certainly there were no questions about it later in the evening.  Then the players were up, in the persons of Daryl Janmaat and Ben Foster who were good value, although Ben was certainly the star of the show.  He is a very funny man and clearly loves Watford.  He waxed lyrical about the football that we have been playing (comparing and contrasting to playing for Tony Pulis) and revealed that his favourite player is Deulofeu, who he hates facing in training.  He also thinks Dahlberg will be a star.  The last section of the evening featured Javi Gracia and Scott Duxbury.  Scott was able to announce that Peñaranda now has a work permit and that Javi was about to sign a new contract.  Javi was as lovely as he seems in his interviews.  It was all very positive and reminded me why I love being a Watford fan.

Liverpool fans protesting Scudamore’s payout

On the way along Vicarage Road to the game, I stopped off to buy a copy of the Watford Treasury from Olly Wicken, who had written an exclusive episode of Hornet Heaven for the supplement.  A wonderful addition to a publication that was already full of fascinating stuff.  Well worth a fiver of anyone’s money.

As I took my seat in the Rookery, I couldn’t help noticing how many people with season tickets were asking the stewards the way to their seats.  That didn’t happen when we played Huddersfield.  Thankfully, there were few strangers around us and those that were there were wearing Watford scarves.

Team news was that Gracia had made three changes from the Southampton game bringing Deeney, Masina and Capoue in for Success, Chalobah and Holebas.  So the starting line-up was Foster; Femenía, Mariappa, Cathcart, Masina; Hughes, Doucoure, Capoue, Pereyra; Deulofeu and Deeney.

Prior to kick-off there was a superb set of banners in the away end protesting Scudamore’s golden handshake.  Well done to the Liverpool fans for that.

Hughes takes a free kick

Watford started the game brilliantly and I was on my feet celebrating in the second minute as Deulofeu finished past Alisson.  Sadly, the celebrations were cut short by the linesman’s flag.  The Spaniard had another chance soon after, but this time the ball was cleared before he could shoot.  On 18 minutes, Watford won a corner.  As I had my camera focussed on the box waiting for the ball in, I missed the short corner, which was greeted with groans from those around me as they bemoaned a wasted opportunity.  Liverpool’s first real chance came soon after, but Foster got his fingertips to Shaqiri’s cross preventing it from reaching Salah.  The Egyptian threatened again as he ran onto a forward ball, but Ben Foster played sweeper coming out to intercept and launch the ball back upfield.  A dangerous free-kick from Shaqiri deserved more than a mishit from Wijnaldum allowing Foster to make an easy save.  Then a mistake allowed Firmino to break into the Watford box but Foster came to the rescue again, dropping to make the save.  At the other end, the Hornets had a chance to take the lead as a lovely shot from Pereyra was turned wide by Alisson.  Then Mané threatened on the break, but was stopped by a great tackle from Cathcart.  The Liverpool man had another chance with an overhead kick that Foster pushed wide.  The resulting corner was met by the head of Salah but, again, Foster was equal to it and the half time whistle went with the game goalless.

Mariappa on the ball

It had been a decent half with few chances.  Apart from the first 15 minutes, Liverpool had all of the possession, but a decent defensive display and some brave keeping from Foster had stopped them making the breakthrough.

The first attack of the second half came from the visitors as Mané’s shot hit the near post, but the flag was up anyway.  Watford had a strong appeal for a penalty when Hughes was tripped in the box, but the referee was not interested.  The first substitution was made just before the hour mark as Deulofeu was replaced by Success and, as has become his habit, showed his dismay when he reached the dugout.  The first booking of the game came as Henderson was cautioned for puling Success to the ground as he tried to escape.  A Watford attack was stopped by a rather bizarre offside decision against Deeney.  The visitors immediately broke down the other end and Mané crossed for Salah whose shot appeared to go through Foster.  A great shame after the keeper’s great work so far on the afternoon.   Watford tried to break back but a cross from Femenía was headed clear by van Dijk before it reached Deeney.  Then a cross into the Liverpool box was cleared only as far as Capoue whose shot cleared the bar.

Masina and Pereyra prepare for a free kick

Each side made a substitution as Shaqiri made way for Milner for the visitors, and Gray replaced Hughes for the Hornets.  If the first goal looked a bit scrappy, the second was excellent as Alexander-Arnold curled a free kick over the wall and into the top corner.  Liverpool played the last 8 minutes with 10 men as Henderson, who had just been warned after protesting a decision, decided to pull Capoue back.  It was a stupid foul and well worthy of the second yellow.  Success had a chance to pull one back for the Hornets with a shot across goal that only needed a touch, but nobody was there.  The second change for the visitors saw Fabinho replacing Salah.  The Hornets had a wonderful chance to reduce the deficit as a lovely passing move took the ball to Pereyra whose curling shot was just wide of the target.  The third Liverpool goal was just cruel. Foster did really well to stop a shot from Mané, but Firmino was on hand to nod in the rebound.  So the game finished as a 3-0 defeat for the Hornets.

So a disappointing afternoon all in all.  The first half display had been impressive as the defence kept Liverpool at bay.  The penalty that wasn’t given would have put a different perspective on the game, but Liverpool are a good side and were not to be denied, although it has to be said that the scoreline flattered them greatly.  As we say every time we play one of the top clubs, this one was a free hit and I was happy that we gave them a decent game.  After a couple of recent thrashings on our travels to Anfield, this was a very different performance and Liverpool really didn’t look that impressive, which can only be due to Watford playing well.  It is still a testament to the quality of our team that a defeat to one of the top two clubs in the country is viewed as a disappointment.

Another Heavy Defeat at Anfield

Pereyra attempting to keep warm as snow falls during the pre-match handshakes

An away game in Liverpool is always a good opportunity to catch up with one of my oldest and dearest friends and I have to say that I travelled to Liverpool acutely aware that the time spent with her and the planned visit to the Tate on Sunday were likely to be considerably more enjoyable than the 90 minutes at Anfield.

Saturday lunchtime we had a lovely walk through the woods from her town to the next railway station down the line.  The weather was lovely, a bright blue sky with the forecast snow falling as the wispiest of flakes.  As we waited for our trains she mentioned that she often visits a pub nearby which happens to be Jurgen Klopp’s local.  When I arrived in the City Centre, it was decked out in green, white and gold for St Patrick’s Day and everyone I passed seemed to be wearing a green shirt (as was I).  Given that the Six Nations clash between Ireland and England was taking place that afternoon, I felt sorry for any English rugby fans who may have been in town as they were horribly outnumbered.

When I had texted one of my party earlier in the day to reassure him that I still had his ticket and find out what time he would be in the pub, I was a little surprised when he indicated that it would be soon after midday.  When I arrived, a couple of hours after that, it was acknowledged that this was similar to arriving in the West Herts at 9:30 in the morning.  Even Don doesn’t get there that early.

Remembering the 96

We had a convivial and very tasty lunch (the pies are so good) and were soon joined by the Happy Valley Horns and the Liverpool contingent.  As we left the pub (with Ireland well on the way to a result that would give them the Grand Slam) some proper snow was falling.  As the buses for the stadium started lining up I was impressed to see them displaying a banner “Remembering the 96”.

When we arrived at the ground, the short walk from the bus to the away entrance was bitter as an icy wind accompanied the snow.  The security search was perfunctory and the lovely woman performing it said that I would soon be inside and could warm myself up jumping up and down as my team came out for the game.  I smiled and said that we’d make the most of that as it wasn’t likely that we would have any goals to celebrate.

Team news was just the one change in personnel from the Arsenal game, as Britos came in to replace Janmaat, and a change of formation to 5-4-1.  So the starting line-up was Karnezis; Femenía, Mariappa, Prödl, Britos, Holebas; Pereyra, Doucouré, Capoue, Richarlison; Deeney.

Prior to kick-off there was a minute’s applause for John Molineux, a former Liverpool player who recently passed away.

Javi all wrapped up at Anfield

The game started disastrously for the Hornets as Salah broke into the box in the third minute and left Britos on the floor before beating Karnezis to open the scoring.   At least I’m told that was what happened, as I was too short to see the action in the box at our end which was obscured by my fellow fans standing in front of me.  The Egyptian could have increased the lead soon after as a through ball was played towards him, but Karnezis was out to save on the edge of the box.  At last a Watford attack as Femenía went on a run down the wing before crossing for Pereyra whose header looped wide of the target.  It went a bit quiet then for a while (thank goodness) the next action was a decent attack by the Hornets as Doucouré broke free of the Liverpool defence but decided against taking a shot so passed to Femenia and the home defence were able to clear.  Liverpool were forced into an early substitution due to an injury to Can, who was replaced by Milner.  The Hornets launched another attack as Deeney played the ball out to Pereyra who did brilliantly to beat his man and get into the box, he played the ball across the goal, but it was blocked.  At the other end, Watford’s day was summed up in a single move as Prödl made a brilliant tackle to dispossess Salah and then immediately lost the ball.  Watford’s best chance of the game so far came came as Pereyra crossed for Richarlison, whose header was on target but straight at Karius.  The next move seemed to start with a foul on the edge of the Liverpool box as Pereyra was pulled to the ground, but the referee was unmoved and the home side launched a counter attack allowing Salah to break free before playing a ball to Firmino who was stopped by a brilliant save from Karnezis.  Just when I thought that Watford could get to half time only one down, Liverpool scored the simplest of goals as Robertson played a lovely cross to an unmarked Salah who had the easiest of tap-ins (I am told, again my view of the shot was obscured).

Deeney and Pereyra looking horrified

The home side increased their lead early in the second half, while many were still in the concourse enjoying their half time refreshments.  I actually saw this one as it was at the other end of the ground, or I thought I did and was under the impression that it marked Salah’s hat trick, but he turned provider on this occasion as his cross from a narrow angle was turned into the net by an audacious flick from Firmino.  Watford had a couple of decent chances to reduce the deficit.  First a shot from Holebas flew just wide of the near post.  Then Gomez was shown a yellow card for a foul on Richarlison, allowing Pereyra to step up and hit a lovely free kick that bounced off the top of the crossbar.  The Hornets attacked again as a lovely ball was played out to Holebas who whipped the cross in but Karius plucked the ball out of the air.  At the other end there were shouts for handball as Mariappa blocked a cross from Firmino, but the referee saw no infringement.  Pereyra did really well to battle past a couple of defenders before crossing for Richarlison, who was being challenged so was off balance and could only manage a weak header that was easily blocked.  There was a rash of substitutions midway through the second half as, first, Hughes replaced Richarlison, then Okaka replaced Deeney to much muttering behind me.  “We’re three goals down and he takes off a striker”.  I couldn’t help thinking that going for it would be reckless at this stage when all we were playing for was goal difference.

Gathering for a Watford corner

For the home side Oxlade-Chamberlain replaced Wijnaldum.  The young substitute was the next to test Karnezis, but it was an easy save for the Watford keeper.  Karnezis was less successful a couple of minutes later as Salah got the ball in the box and, despite there being a number of defenders in his way, he tricked them all and finished for his hat-trick and Liverpool’s fourth.  Watford hadn’t given up and Okaka broke into the Liverpool box, but with less success as his shot was blocked.  The final substitution for each side saw Ings replacing Firmino and Janmaat on for Britos, who had had a torrid time of it against Salah so was likely happy to be relieved of his duties.  Ings almost scored with his first attempt, but Karnezis made a great save, stretching and managing to get a hand to the shot to keep it out.  But Liverpool were not to be denied their fifth goal as Salah set up Ings whose shot was blocked so the ball rebounded to the Egyptian to score his fourth goal of the evening.  Salah had one more chance, and my heart sank as I saw him bearing down on the Watford goal, but Karnezis was able to get in the way and block the attempt.  As the fourth official held up the board indicating only 2 minutes of added time, Pete observed that it must have been a sympathy decision.  There was a rare moment to make me smile as the ball ended up in one of the stands and Mane leant over the hoardings to retrieve it while Prödl held his legs.  Watford had one last chance to score a consolation goal as Femenía swung a cross in, but Matip was on hand to clear and the whistle went on another heavy defeat for the Hornets at Anfield.

Holebas and Richarlison lining up a free kick with Britos contemplating joining them

As we left the stadium, I was very grateful to see that the snow had stopped falling so I had a very pleasant walk back to Sandhills station before taking a seat on a sparsely occupied train back to my friend’s house on the coast.

I arrived back to a sympathetic welcome, although I couldn’t say that I was either cold or wet, just rather miserable about the result of the game.  But it was hardly an unexpected outcome and I found myself baffled about the constant complaints that I heard from the people behind me.  I had observed early in the game that Liverpool were simply better than us, but that didn’t seem to register.  Some fans seem unable to view a game from that perspective so spend ninety minutes berating their players for losing to a team playing some brilliant football.

There were some positives for the Hornets.  Karnezis, despite letting in five goals, put on a decent show.  But my highlight was a decent performance from Pereyra, who put together some lovely moves which cheered me up greatly on a day when there were few moments of joy.  He seems to shine against more talented opposition as he clearly feels that he is less likely to be clattered.

But, in the end, it was the Salah show.  He is an exceptional footballer and sometimes you have to just appreciate that and move on.  This game was never one that we targeted to gain points, so we should all recharge our batteries over the international break and return, refreshed, for the visit of Bournemouth.

 

Football is Fun Again

A young GT and his coaching badges

The first day of the season and, on arriving in Watford, it was grey and drizzly.  I was at the Hornet Shop before 9:30, so it was rather bizarre to see the programme sellers and burger stands already setting up.  Having bought the new home and away shirts, a woolly hat (just in case) and a Watford coffee cup, I headed to the museum to get in line for the Graham Taylor exhibition.

We were there as the doors were opened so had plenty of time to enjoy the display.  It was very much a celebration of the man, with memories from other clubs, although his time at Watford was paramount.  It was lovely to see everything from his coaching badges and certificates to the robes from his investiture as Freeman of the Borough.  There were other lovely treats, a family photo of GT crossing the line at the London Marathon in a time of 3:21:11, plus his sponsorship form, as he was raising money for the family terrace, and his medal.  The Norfolk Horns flag, signed by the stalwarts of that group, was tucked away.

GT and Rita at the Palace and the OBE

My niece had come along, so was ‘treated’ to the old people reminiscing.  To this end, I was delighted to spot the Terry Challis cartoon from the weekend after we beat both Spurs and Man Utd 5-1 in May 1985.  Her reasonable question was if those teams were good then.  Oh yes, and the cartoon still makes me smile. But the highlight was the photo of GT and Rita at Buckingham Palace when he received his OBE, which was displayed alongside the award itself.  It was a lovely exhibition and so kind of Rita, Joanne and Karen to share their memories with the fans.  The comment book that was available will be shared with the family, so gave us a chance to say thank you.  There was an additional treat with the presence of some old Watford friends who I hadn’t seen in a while.  So lovely to catch up.

So to Vicarage Road for the early kick-off.  The new season ticket worked, which is always a good thing.  As I entered the gangway to our seats, our usual steward wasn’t there.  The new incumbent asked whether I knew where I was going and, when I said that I did, demanded to see my ticket.  In the 15 years that I have had that seat, I have never been asked to show evidence.  Silly, but it really irritated me.

One of the delights of the first game of the season is to catch up with our Rookery neighbours after a Summer apart.  It was good to see them all present and correct.

Team news was that only one of our new signings was in the starting line-up and, given that it was our old friend Chalobah, it didn’t seem like a new face at all.  The starting line-up was Gomes; Janmaat, Kaboul, Britos, Holebas; Chalobah, Doucouré; Amrabat, Cleverley, Pereyra; Okaka

Somewhere in the distance, Okaka is opening the scoring

Watford started the game brightly and created the first chance in the 5th minute when a cross from Janmaat was headed clear before Okaka could reach it.  Okaka then played a through ball to Pereyra whose shot was deflected wide.  Having discovered in the museum that my camera battery was dead, I decided to try out the camera on my phone as the players gathered for the corner.  I was faffing trying to focus, so missed seeing Okaka connect with the delivery from Holebas to head home and open the scoring.  I wasn’t too late in joining in the celebrations though.  Janmaat went down injured after a quarter of an hour, nothing new there, so had to be replaced by Femenía.  I had been impressed with what I had seen from the Spaniard in pre-season, so was not too concerned at this early change.  The substitute’s first action was a great tackle to stop Mané advancing down the wing, he was rewarded with a foul by the Liverpool man.  Watford threatened again with a cross from Amrabat, but Mignolet gathered with Okaka lurking.

Femenia takes a throw in

Just before the half hour mark, there was some activity among the stewards who had their eye on some miscreant in the rows in front.  I wondered whether they had been alerted to two blokes sitting in front who were clearly Liverpool fans.  It was the ideal time to watch them, as Liverpool scored from their first chance of the game, Mané beating Gomes after a lovely passing move.  The Liverpool guys didn’t react and a man and child who were sitting in the wrong seats were moved.  Having been distracted for the first two goals, I am pleased to say that I was fully engaged when we regained the lead a couple of minutes after the equalizer.  Doucouré, who was impressing, found Cleverley in the box, the return pass led to a bit of a scramble, but eventually fell to the Frenchman who beat Mignolet.  The first booking of the game went to the visitors as Mané was cautioned for a crunching tackle on Doucouré.  Liverpool had a couple of chances to draw level before half time.  First as Salah broke forward and fired over the bar.  Then, in time added on, when Mané met a Firmino corner with a header that flew just wide.

So we reached half time with a deserved lead.  We were playing some superb football and there were smiles all around in the Rookery.

Holebas lining up a free kick

Watford were forced to make another substitution early in the second half as Pereyra pulled up and left the field to be replaced by Richarlison.  I do hope that this will not lead to another long lay-off for Pereyra, but I was very interested in seeing the young Brazilian in action.  While the substitute was being given the tactical talk, Liverpool attacked against the 10 men with Wijnaldum finding Salah who fired wide.  The Egyptian was involved in the next key moment in the game as he broke into the Watford box, Gomes appeared to save at his feet before he took a tumble.  The referee pointed to the spot.  It appeared to be a very harsh penalty from our vantage point in the away end, but replays showed that the referee made the correct decision.  Firmino stepped up and sent Gomes the wrong way to level the game.  It went from bad to worse a couple of minutes later as Firmino ran on to a ball over the top from the Liverpool half, He lofted it over Gomes and Salah turned it in to give the visitors the lead.  There was some confusion on the sidelines at this point.  The board had gone up indicating that Okaka was to be replaced by Gray and Emma Saunders had announced the change, but Silva changed his mind, opting to delay the substitution while they took stock after the goal.  A few minutes later the change was made and the former Burnley man became the third substitute to make his Watford debut.

Andre Gray takes to the field

At this point in the game, Liverpool were in the ascendancy and had a chance to increase their lead as Moreno tried a shot from the edge of the area that was tipped over by Gomes.  From the corner, Matip struck the crossbar.  Liverpool threated again from a corner, on this occasion Lovren’s shot was blocked by Gomes.  Salah had a further chance to increase the lead, but shot over the bar.  On the 72nd minute, the Watford faithful got to their feet to chant Graham Taylor’s name, the minute of chanting being interrupted by some oohing and aahing as Watford attacked the Liverpool box, but the ball ended up with Mignolet.  With a couple of minutes to go, the Liverpool keeper was shown the yellow card for time wasting.  He was to live to regret the 5 minutes that were added on.  Three minutes in, Britos unleashed a shot that took a smart save from Mignolet to push it clear.  He wasn’t so fortunate from the corner, as he pushed Richarlison’s shot onto the bar but Britos was on hand to turn the ball in from point blank range and send the Rookery into ecstasy.  Richarlison had a chance to snatch a winner but his header, following a cross from Amrabat, was wide of the target.  He was injured in the process and spent some time receiving treatment.  This meant some additional added time and one last chance for the visitors but Wijnaldum’s shot was blocked and the game ended in a draw.

Gathering for a corner

Well I certainly didn’t see that coming.  It was a tremendous team performance from a group of players who were working their socks off.  They fought for every ball and, when they were in possession, showed no little skill.  Given that a number of these players have barely met, the teamwork was very pleasing indeed and bodes well for the rest of the season.  Doucouré was given the Watford man of the match award for the sort of assured performance that we have come to expect of him, but a special mention has to go to Richarlison for a very impressive debut.  He fought for absolutely everything and took all that was thrown at him, while displaying skill and power.  He did not look like a player new to English football.  It is early days but if Silva’s men can continue marrying hard work with skilful attacking play, this will be a very enjoyable season indeed.  The game was summed up by comments from more than one of the fans around me, before the equalizer, that they would take a defeat as it had been thoroughly entertaining.

During the week, a friend, who is a Liverpool fan in Madrid, had asked me to answer some questions for their match preview on their website.  My prediction for the day was that the trip to the museum would be the only highlight.  I am very happy to have been proved so wrong.

 

Beaten by a Worldy

Capoue and Cleverley line up a free kick

At the end of a busy bank holiday weekend, it felt rather odd to be going to a game on the Monday evening.  You certainly had to feel sorry for the Liverpool fans who would get home in the early hours with work beckoning in the morning.  I don’t live far from Watford, but even I booked a hotel room for the convenience.  Imagine my surprise when the receptionist asked whether I was here for the football and who I was supporting.  I thought I would be fine when I assured her that I was a Watford fan.  Instead I was told, in no uncertain terms, that if I was a proper Watford fan I would live locally rather than being ‘posh in Windsor’.  I found myself begging forgiveness on the basis that I had moved west for work.

As always when the schedule is messed with, I had no clue what time to arrive at the West Herts.  For once I judged it right.  The food menu for the evening had a Caribbean influence.  I briefly considered the goat curry, but couldn’t resist the jerk chicken.  Although I should have asked for the rice and peas instead of the chips that accompanied the chicken.  It certainly made a welcome change from the usual bacon/sausage in a roll.

Deeney and Niang tracking the flight of the ball

After the results at the weekend, the only team currently in the relegation zone who can still catch us are Swansea.  They would have to win all of their remaining games, which sounds like a tall order but, before the match, I heard more than one person predict that they would overtake us in the table.  I am starting to think that I am becoming very complacent.

Team news was just the one change from Hull with Mariappa replacing the injured Holebas.  So the starting line-up was Gomes; Mariappa, Prödl, Britos; Janmaat, Cleverley, Doucouré, Capoue, Amrabat; Deeney and Niang.

The first chance of the game came in the fifth minute as, following a rapid passing move, Niang found space for a shot but fired it straight at Mignolet.  Klopp was forced into making an early substitution as Coutinho, who had been injured in an earlier challenge with Mariappa, was replaced by Lallana.  Watford threatened again as a lovely move finished with a shot from Deeney that was blocked.  Mazzarri was also forced into an early change as Britos went down injured before limping off to be replaced by Kabasele.

Cleverley taking a corner

The first chance for the visitors came after 20 minutes as a shot from distance by Can was met with a one-handed save from Gomes.  The next Liverpool attack came to nothing as Origi reached the by-line before cutting the ball back into the arms of Gomes.  There were hopeful shouts for a penalty from the Vicarage Road faithful when Deeney was knocked over in the box but he quickly got up and nothing was given.  The referee had been rather flaky, with many decisions appearing to be given according to the volume of protest in the crowd rather than any severity of the offence, so he incurred the wrath of the Rookery when a corner, that appeared to be awarded as an afterthought, nearly led to the visitors taking the lead as Gomes punched the clearance only as far as Lallana whose shot hit the crossbar.  There was hilarity mixed with anger as Lucas went down on the edge of the box with the most obvious of dives and was booked for his trouble.  In time added on at the end of what had been a very dull half, Lucas chipped the ball to Can who hit a superb overhead kick to open the scoring.  Apparently it is the best goal he has ever scored, with pundits declaring it one of the goals of the season.  It was totally out of place in this game.

Ross Jenkins and his grandson

The half time interviews on the pitch couldn’t have been more different.  First lovely Rene Gilmartin appeared with his wife, Emma, talking about the Ross Nugent foundation http://rossnugentfoundation.ie/ which was set up in memory of Emma’s brother, who died at the tragically young age of 18, with the aim of helping cancer sufferers and their families at the hospital where he was treated.

The next to make an appearance was Ross Jenkins.  When asked what it was like to step on to the grass of the Vicarage Road pitch again his response was, “I don’t remember the grass being this good.”  He also said how poor he had been when he first broke into the Watford team but hoped that he had done all right in the end.  I think the reaction of the crowd assured him that he had.  He was accompanied by his grandson who had come over from Spain to watch some Premier League football.  Sadly the first half was enough to give the poor child nightmares.

Isaac Success

Buoyed by the goal, Liverpool started the second half really well.  The first chance came from a Milner free kick from the edge of the area which was saved by Gomes.  The Watford keeper was in action again soon after as Origi tried a shot from distance, but Gomes was able to push it round the post for a corner.  The Belgian threatened again, breaking into the box to shoot, but Gomes again made the save.  Watford had been on the back foot for the first 20 minutes of the second half, so it was a relief to see them on the attack.  When Janmaat beat Clyne on the wing, he appeared in two minds about what to do next.  In the end he hit a decent cross, but it was easily gathered by Mignolet.  Watford came close to an equaliser as an Amrabat shot was blocked, the ball fell to Capoue outside the area who hit a lovely dipping shot that Mignolet did well to tip over the bar.  Sadly the referee appreciated neither the shot nor the save as he awarded a goal kick instead of a corner.  This infuriated Capoue, who was booked for his protests.  Amrabat threatened again, this time with a cross that was gathered by Mignolet.  Mazzarri’s second substitution came on 72 minutes with Success replacing Capoue.  Janmaat had a great chance to equalize as he surprised Mignolet with a shot that the Liverpool keeper was just able to keep it out.  There was a rash of late substitutions as Origi and Lallana (who was a sub himself) made way for Sturridge and Klaven for the visitors and Okaka replaced Amrabat for the home side.  In the 90th minute, Liverpool had a great chance to seal the victory when Sturridge shot from the edge of the box but, yet again, Gomes kept it out.  Watford could have won a point in time added on as Prödl volleyed goalwards but his shot cannoned off the crossbar and the visitors left with all three points.

Prodl looking predatory

The post-game reaction was very mixed.  Some had enjoyed the game and were happy enough with a narrow defeat, particularly as the goal was an unstoppable strike. Others, as has often been the case of late, were frustrated with Mazzarri’s defensive tactics arguing that, given Liverpool’s inconsistency, this may well have been our last chance to gain points this season so we should have been trying to win the game.  I think that is doing Liverpool something of a disservice given their lofty position in the table.  My position fell somewhere between the two, certainly an attacking end to the game goes a long way to sending me home happy, but it also makes me wonder why we can’t take that approach earlier in the game.  Having been brought up on GT’s brand of football where the aim was to score more than the opposition, I hate to see teams set up to stifle play.  So, as the season winds down, I can’t help feeling rather sad that, despite having spent most of the season comfortably clear of the relegation zone, a large proportion of our fans are both bored and frustrated.  I wonder whether this would still be the case if Mazzarri’s approach to games was more attacking or is this what mid-table obscurity in the Premier League feels like?

 

Thrashed at Anfield

Th pre-match display in the Kop is as impressive as ever

Th pre-match display in the Kop is as impressive as ever

One of my closest and longest-standing friends

lives on Merseyside so, when the fixture list came out, I arranged to spend the weekend visiting.  I arrived on Friday afternoon a little too early for them to be home from work, so I spent the time I had to kill in the Tate with Klein, Krasiński, Blake and Emin, which was a lovely relaxing start to the weekend.  A Saturday spent walking on the beach followed by some sightseeing in the city and the firework display and I was suitably refreshed and ready for whatever was to come on Sunday afternoon.

On Sunday morning, I was treated to a slap-up breakfast before heading in to town.  My plan had been to leave my weekend bag in the left luggage at Lime Street Station, so it was a bit of a shock to arrive there to find that signs stating ‘Sorry, full.’  They could not offer an alternative venue beyond finding a local hostel that may keep the bag.  I contemplated trying one of the hotels nearby but decided just to hope that they would allow me in at Anfield.  On arrival at the pub, I bumped into our award-nominated Supporter Liaison Officer and mentioned my problem.  He checked the advice that had been received, which mentioned ‘small bags only’.  At that point I threw myself on the mercy of the bar manager who happily took my bag and stowed it away for my return.  What a lovely bloke.

The minute's silence

The minute’s silence

A big crowd of Watford fans gathered for the pre-match beers both those who had travelled north and a large contingent of North West Hornets.  As I boarded the bus to go from the city centre to Anfield, I headed for the back row of the top deck where there were a number of our faithful but no spare seats.  Thankfully my lovely friend, Alice, offered me a seat on her lap that was considerably more comfortable for me than for her, but for which I was very grateful indeed.

Team news was that Mazzarri had made the one enforced change as Janmaat came in for the injured Prödl.  So the starting line-up was Gomes; Janmaat, Kaboul, Britos, Holebas; Amrabat, Behrami, Capoue, Pereyra; Deeney and Ighalo.

As this was the closest game to Remembrance Sunday, there was a minute’s silence in memory of the war dead that was impeccably observed.

Amrabat and Coutinho await Janmaat's throw-in

Amrabat and Coutinho await Janmaat’s throw-in

The pre-match concern had been how our cobbled together defence would cope with the pace of the Liverpool team and the way that the home side started the game provided no comfort to Watford fans.  They had an early chance as Lallana went on a great run before crossing for Firmino, whose shot was straight at Gomes in the Watford goal.  There was a brief distraction off the field soon after.  Anfield is the one ground in the Premier League at which, due to the impact of Hillsborough, none of the home fans stand for long periods of time, so the stewards came to request that those in the lower section of away fans take their seats.  A few people did as requested but one man decided to argue the toss with both the steward and a fan who complained of his view being blocked and another came running in from elsewhere to have a go at the steward and the fan, so the majority remained standing ensuring that I could see very little of what went on in the goalmouth just to our left.

Watford’s first chance came on 10 minutes after some decent hold up play from Ighalo, he played the ball out to Amrabat who shot wide.  The home side had a great chance to take the lead as Watford failed to clear a corner, the ball fell to Lucas whose shot was stopped by a close range save from Gomes.  At the other end, Britos met a Capoue free kick with a header that was easily saved by Karius.

Klopp observing Mazzarri's instructions

Klopp observing Mazzarri’s instructions

Liverpool came close to opening the scoring with a shot from Coutinho that cannoned back off the crossbar.  On 20 minutes, the home side should have taken the lead as Janmaat failed to put in a tackle on Mané who made his way into the box before finding Coutinho, thankfully for the visitors the Brazilian’s shot was off target.  Liverpool threatened again as a Milner shot from the edge of the area was caught by Gomes.  In a rare attack by the visitors, Amrabat put in a dangerous cross, but there was no Watford player in the box to apply the final touch.  Liverpool continued the onslaught, but there was good work from Britos to distract Firmino as a through ball came to him, so he shot wide.  Gomes was then called into action, first to stop a shot from Mané that was straight at him, then Milner broke into the box and was stopped by a brave intervention from the Watford keeper that was to have consequences later on.  The resultant corner led to Liverpool finally opening the scoring on 27 minutes, as it was met by a lovely header from Mané.  There was a brief flurry of activity from the visitors as a Pereyra flick fell just behind Deeney.  Then Amrabat crossed to Ighalo in the box, he touched the ball across to Deeney who was unable to connect and the ball rolled through to the keeper.  Liverpool were two goals up within a couple of minutes as Coutinho scored with a shot from the edge of the area.  There appeared to be some strong words between Mazzarri and Deeney on the sidelines after this goal and Troy came on with instructions for each of his colleagues.

Kaboul strikes a free kick

Kaboul strikes a free kick

Of more concern at this time was that Gomes was flat on his back in the area and, once it was clear that it wasn’t just a gesture of frustration, the physio was on and a stretcher appeared.  The Brazilian eschewed use of the stretcher and hopped off the field to applause from the travelling Hornet faithful and also the Liverpool fans on that side of the pitch, which was much appreciated.  Pantilimon took his place and must have been grateful that the peppering of the Watford goal slowed down for a while.  There was a brief hope that the visitors would reduce the deficit as a Holebas free kick was cleared only as far as Amrabat who hit a wild shot well over the bar.  But the action moved straight down the other end of the field and Can headed Lallana’s cross past Pantilimon for Liverpool’s third goal.  Again Watford attempted to strike back as Capoue broke into the box before shooting, but Karius was equal to the effort.  The last chance of the half came from the home side as Milner hit a free kick that was kept out of the net by a one handed save from Pantilimon.  It was a relief when the half time whistle went.  As expected, Liverpool’s pace had been relentless and too much for the Watford defence but, on a positive note, Watford had continued to launch counter-attacks rather than wilting under the pressure.

Pereyra takes a corner

Pereyra takes a corner

The first attack of note in the second half came as Coutinho hit an effort from distance that flew just wide.  For the visitors Ighalo cut the ball back to Janmaat, but the shot was straight at the Liverpool keeper.  The first caution of the game went to Holebas for a clumsy trip on Mané.  Liverpool scored their fourth on 57 minutes as a cross from Lallana rolled through the entire Watford defence before being turned in by Firmino, it looked like terrible defending.  The fifth goal was scored on the hour as Firmino cut the ball back for Mané to beat Pantilimon.  At this point each side made a substitution as Watson replaced Behrami (who had a poor game) for the visitors and Wijnaldum came on for Mané.  Watford had their best spell of the game at this point and it is difficult to say whether this was due to the introduction of Watson or the home side relaxing.  A cross from Amrabat was nicked from just in front of Ighalo and cleared for a corner which came out to Capoue whose shot was stopped by a decent save from Karius.  Another good stop from the Liverpool keeper prevented Britos from pulling a goal back for the Hornets.  Liverpool’s second substitution saw Sturridge replacing Lallana.  Some great work from Watson, who managed to complete a pass while falling over, started a lovely move which finished with Deeney playing a through ball to Capoue whose shot was stopped on the line.  Soon after, the visitors got on the scoresheet as Amrabat cut the ball back to Janmaat who beat Karius to give the travelling Hornets something to celebrate.

Ighalo, Deeney and Capoue waiting for a ball in

Ighalo, Deeney and Capoue waiting for a ball in

Watford continued to attack with a shot from distance from Ighalo that the keeper was equal to.  Liverpool could have restored their five goal advantage soon after as a shot from Sturridge rebounded off the crossbar.  The second card of the game went to Britos for a foul on Can.  Sturridge threated again as he broke forward and unleashed a shot that required a decent save from Pantilimon to keep it out.  Mazzarri’s final substitution saw Zúñiga on for Pereyra, while Klopp replaced Coutinho with Ejaria.  Sturridge seemed determined to get his name on the scoresheet as he hit a curling shot that appeared to be tipped on to the cross bar.  He followed this with a shot from a tight angle that was saved, but Liverpool were not to be denied a sixth goal as Wijnaldum connected with the loose ball to finish past Pantilimon.  Watford had one final chance to finish the game on a positive note as a Holebas cross was headed down to Deeney who turned and shot, but the effort was blocked.

When the final whistle went, it was a relief.  Very few of the Watford players came to acknowledge the fans, which is understandable, but it was nice to see Amrabat, Watson and Deeney make the effort.  Troy had his taken his boots off with the intention of throwing them to someone in the crowd.  The stewards had a word which meant that he just handed them to a couple of youngsters at the front, which is a much better option.

Holebas lines up a free kick

Holebas lines up a free kick

I must be mellowing in my old age as this didn’t hurt anything like as much as previous heavy defeats.  I think it helped that Watford didn’t just sit back, so there was some attacking play to enjoy.  Also, Liverpool were superb and there is no shame in being beaten by a team as good as that.  It was one of those games when I really wished that I was a neutral as I would have thoroughly enjoyed Liverpool’s performance.  Plus points for the Hornets were that Amrabat had another decent game going forward and we looked a lot stronger in midfield when Watson came on.  Ben put in a good showing which also allowed Capoue some freedom, so his performance improved considerably.

A number of us had booked a train home that allowed plenty of time for post-match discussions which were strangely enjoyable given that we had so little to cheer about.  I continued my good fortune with great company on the journey home as Miles Jacobson spotted an old friend of his so we were joined by Ray Houghton, who is a hero of mine and turned out to be a delightful man.  It was so interesting listening to him and when he kissed me goodbye at the end of the journey, it didn’t feel like such a bad day after all.

 

A Better Performance at Anfield

Justice for the 96

Justice for the 96

Liverpool’s progression to the semi-final of the Europa League meant that our trip to Anfield was delayed to Sunday.  Thankfully, I had bought refundable train tickets, so was able to reschedule with no hassle.  It also meant that I had a Saturday afternoon free to see The Caretaker at the Old Vic which I had missed (slept through) after watching the U18s lose in their play-off a couple of weeks before.  The play was marvellous, Timothy Spall absolutely brilliant, and it made a lovely start to the weekend.

The train journey north seemed overly leisurely with a number of stops at intermediate stations to remain on schedule, so I was happy finally to arrive in Liverpool.  Even better to find that the pre-match pub was pleasantly empty, so I joined the advance party and was soon happily sat with good beer, a nice lunch and wonderful company.

The build-up to this match was oddly devoid of discussions of the home game against Liverpool, which seemed like a distant memory.  That was an amazing game and, sadly, our league form since has been rather poor, meaning that the achievements of this season have been overshadowed by the recent disappointments.

Team news was that Flores had made one change from the Villa game, bringing Prödl in for Paredes, meaning that Cathcart moved to the right back position.  So the starting line-up was Gomes, Anya, Prödl, Britos, Cathcart, Jurado, Watson, Suarez, Abdi, Deeney and Ighalo.  The inclusion of three centre backs did not go down well with many in the pre-match pub, but I’d trust Cathcart anywhere across the back.

The Kop pre-game

The Kop pre-game

We got on the bus to the ground with some friendly Liverpool fans and were dropped off to meet the rest of our party who had driven directly to the ground and visited the Fan Zone to pass the time.  As we waited at the away turnstiles, we saw the East Anglian Horns with a banner celebrating the final achievement of justice for the Hillsborough 96.  Well done to all involved in the banner for paying tribute to their fellow fans.

Prior to kick off, the rendition of “You’ll Never Walk Alone” made the hairs on the back of the neck stand up.

Watford had the first shot on goal as Ighalo made an audacious attempt to lob Mignolet that was only just over the bar.  The visitors had another chance to take the lead as Ighalo played the ball out to Anya who crossed for Abdi whose shot was disappointingly over the bar.  I noticed, at this point, that the entire Kop was sitting down.  It puzzled me for a minute as it was such an unusual sight but, of course, Liverpool fans are passionately anti standing following the Hillsborough disaster.

Ighalo challenges for the ball

Ighalo challenges for the ball

Liverpool’s first chance came on 11 minutes with a shot from Coutinho that was deflected just wide.  At the other end, a cross from Abdi flew just over the head of Jurado.  For the home side, Moreno’s shot from just outside the area flew well over the bar.  Then Anya broke forward and tried a shot from a tight angle which flew over.  There was a very odd interlude as Coutinho prepared to take a free kick.  The referee marked the spot the kick should be taken from with his spray.  The player chose his spot and was told to move the ball.  But, as the referee walked away to mark the line for the defence, Coutinho picked the foam spot up and moved it and the ball to where he wanted to take the kick.  Bizarre.  A ball over the top reached Ighalo in the box, but it was taken off his feet by a defender who conceded a corner.  The corner was cleared to Abdi whose shot was blocked on the line.  Suárez conceded a free kick when he tripped Ibe just outside the box.  Benteke hit both the set piece and his follow-up into the wall.  Liverpool opened the scoring soon afterwards and it was a poor goal to give away.  A cross from Coutinho was knocked down by Benteke into the path of Allen and he finished past Gomes.  Watford almost hit back immediately as Anya found Jurado on the wing, his cross was headed just wide by Ighalo.  It was Watson’s turn next as he made up for his initial mis-kick with a better shot that was blocked.  At the other end Coutinho had two chances: first a shot from distance that was saved by Gomes, then a shot that was blocked by Prödl.  There was a shout for a penalty from the Hornets faithful as Skrtel appeared to be on Deeney’s shoulders in the box, but nothing was given so the Hornets went in at the break a goal down.  Despite the moans at the team selection, it had been a much better performance than of late and we were unfortunate to be behind.  In particular, Ighalo had been much livelier and I lived in hope that he would find his shooting boots in the second half.

Abdi lines up a free kick

Abdi lines up a free kick

The home side had the first chance of the second period as Coutinho played the ball out to Benteke before receiving a return ball which he put wide.  The Brazilian had another chance soon after, but this time his shot was easily saved by Gomes.  Ojo made a dangerous break before shooting high and wide.  Flores made his first substitute on 52 minutes bringing Guedioura on for Suárez.  Ighalo had a great chance to equalize as Anya crossed from the left and Deeney dummied leaving the Nigerian to hit a sweet shot that was heading for the top corner when Mignolet got his fingertips to it to push it behind.  Guedioura was the next to try his luck with a shot from distance that flew high and wide.  Flores made a second substitution replacing Jurado with Berghuis.  Britos was the first to find his way into the referee’s book, although he was a bit unfortunate as he was swinging his leg at the ball when Benteke came running in and was kicked.  Liverpool’s first change came on the hour as Firmino replaced Coutinho.  The substitute tried his luck immediately but his shot was comfortably saved by Gomes.  A promising Watford move was stopped by a cynical foul by Flanagan on Abdi.  The Kosovan had a decent chance soon after as, with the Watford fans chanting his name, he hit a free kick just over the bar.  That was his last contribution to the game as he was replaced immediately by Amrabat.

Britos lines up a free kick

Britos lines up a free kick

Deeney did brilliantly to keep the ball while being challenged, his cross reached Ighalo, but the Nigerian couldn’t convert.  Deeney played the ball out to Berghuis whose shot was straight at Mignolet.  The Dutchman was then booked for a late tackle on Ibe.  It had been a lovely spell of play for the Hornets, so it was a great disappointment when Anya gave the ball away and it reached Firmino whose shot beat Gomes, who got a hand to it but couldn’t keep it out.  Again the Hornets tried to hit back as a shot from Ighalo was deflected into the side netting.  Britos met the corner from Berghuis with a header that flew over the bar.  Amrabat crossed for Ighalo who didn’t catch the ball properly, so the shot looped into the keeper’s arms.  At the other end a cross from Benteke was gathered by Gomes.  The home side could have increased their lead as Firmino’s cross drifted along in front of goal and Ibe met it with a powerful shot that came back off the post.  At this point, there was an announcement over the tannoy for the Watford supporters thanking them for their support for the 96 and particularly the banner and wishing us a safe journey home.  This was met with warm and lengthy applause from the travelling Hornets.  There was one last chance in time added on and it fell to the home side with a cross that Benteke somehow turned over the bar when it would have been easier to score.

Flores consoling Deeney

Flores consoling Deeney

So the final whistle went to a 2-0 defeat which was met with a chant of ‘3-2 on aggregate.’  It had been a much better performance, let down by a couple of mistakes which led to goals, and poor finishing from a Watford perspective.  Ighalo had the best game he has had for months but, earlier in the season, would have converted at least two of his chances.  After the final whistle we stayed behind to applaud the team.  Troy is normally the last player to come to the away end after he has completed his captain’s duties, but this afternoon was different.  I saw him standing talking to Flores, he had his head down and looked distraught.  Flores spoke to him for a while and then they came towards us together to take the plaudits.

As we left the ground we were wished a safe journey home by some of the nicest stewards that I have encountered all season.  That was also the most positive that I have felt after a defeat for some time.  It is hard to believe that there is only a week left of the season.  It has flown by and, at this stage, our only relegation concerns are regarding where we will be visiting next season.  That makes me very happy.

 

Embarrassing the Reds

The flags fly in the SEJ Stand

The flags fly in the SEJ Stand

Sunday lunchtime games always feel a bit odd.  I usually spend most of Saturday worrying that I have somehow misunderstood the fixture list and am missing the game.  So it is always a relief to arrive at the West Herts early doors and see a host of Hornet fans.  Prior to the game I indulged in the breakfast of champions, a pint and a ‘bumper breakfast baguette’, which went down a treat.  The addition of black pudding was what sold it to me, it set me up for the day.  It was a little odd to be watching the build-up to the game on the television, but every appearance of Quique, Troy and Odion was greeted with cheers. It was also lovely to see Johnny Barnes back at Vicarage Road.

Team news was that the team was unchanged from the Sunderland game so the starting line-up was Gomes, Aké, Cathcart, Britos, Nyom, Watson, Capoue, Jurado, Deeney, Abdi and Ighalo.

As requested by the 1881, we were in our seats in plenty of time for kick off and, as the teams came out to Z-cars, those of us in the Rookery held up our foils which, I discovered later, showed an Ighalo celebration.  At the front of the stand, some of the 1881 were holding a banner thanking the Pozzos.  A really lovely touch.  From our perspective in the Rookery, it was also good to see the flags waving in the SEJ stand.  We are usually behind them so it was a pleasure to see how good they look.

Celebrating Ake's goal

Celebrating Ake’s goal

Watford had the best possible start to the game as Aké forced a corner, Bogdan dropped Watson’s delivery and Nathan was on hand to turn the ball in to the net.  Cue mad celebrations and a bit of celebratory bouncing.  Watford continued in a positive vein and Škrtel had to throw his body in the way to stop a cross from Deeney.  Liverpool’s first forward foray ended with a cut back into the box that was cleared by Capoue.  The resulting corner was headed clear by Ighalo.  I always enjoy seeing forward players helping out in defence.  Coutinho had Liverpool’s first shot on target, but it was an easy catch for Gomes.  After our early goal, I had commented that I hoped we wouldn’t be hanging on for the next 87 minutes,  so I was very grateful, after a quarter of an hour, when Deeney played a ball over the top for Ighalo who battled past Škrtel and scored with a shot that went in off the far post.  At this point, there was a joyful rendition of “Jürgen, Jürgen, what’s the score?”  Liverpool’s first attempt to strike back came from a corner by Coutinho that went straight to Gomes.  At the other end, an Abdi back-heel reached Capoue whose shot was blocked.  There was a great chance for a third Watford goal as Deeney played the ball over to Ighalo, his initial shot was blocked and then Bogdan blocked Jurado’s shot at the far post.

Celebrating Ighalo's first

Celebrating Ighalo’s first

A Liverpool break was stopped by a biting tackle from Aké.  With 5 minutes remaining in the half, Klopp was forced to make a substitution bringing Origi on for the injured Škrtel.  The frustration of the visitors was clearly demonstrated when Henderson was flagged offside and reacted with a prolonged show of petulance.  In the last minute of the half, Abdi and Deeney exchanged passes but the cross was put out for a corner.

So we reached the break two goals up after a wonderfully controlled performance that thoroughly justified the lead.

At half time, Robbo was on the field to draw the 50-50 tickets.  It was great to see him back and he was greeted with a tremendous reception.

When Ádám Bogdán took his place in the goal at the Rookery end before the start of the second half, you couldn’t help but feel sorry for the lad as he arrived to great cheers after his contribution to our first goal.

Gomes takes a kick

Gomes takes a kick

The visitors started the second half very brightly and had an early chance as Henderson played the ball over to Moreno in space, but Gomes narrowed the angle so the shot was into the side netting.  Origi fought off the attentions of Britos to get in a shot, but Gomes was down to save.  At this point. The Liverpool fans could be heard for the first time all afternoon.  At the other end, Watson released Nyom whose cross went out for a corner off the chest of Henderson.  A Liverpool break was stopped as Nyom closed the player down and prevented the cross.  Then Deeney tried a dink into the box for Ighalo, but there were three Liverpool players on him to stop him shooting.  Ighalo broke into the box again and tried a shot from a narrow angle, it was blocked and broke to Jurado who tried to poke the ball in but, somehow, it was kept out.  On the hour mark, a dangerous Henderson cross was headed wide by Lallana.  Then Jurado played a lovely through ball for Ighalo whose shot was saved by Bogdan.  It took until the 66th minute for Liverpool to really test Gomes and the Watford keeper was equal to the shot from Henderson, tipping it over the bar.  Then Troy won the ball on the wing and advanced, but his cross was blocked.  We almost shot ourselves in the foot as a terrible clearance went straight to Can, but Gomes was on hand to push the shot clear.  Klopp made a double substitution as Ibe and Benteke replaced Lallana and Firmino.

Harry joins the celebrations as the game is won

Harry joins the celebrations as the game is won

Watford threatened again as Capoue played the ball out to Ighalo but he had to run wide of the goal and his cross was over Jurado’s head and went begging.  Flores made his first substitution bringing Anya on for Jurado, who had another decent game.  The next attack by the visiotrs finished with a shot from Henderson that was blocked.  The only card of the game went to Britos who was booked for rather an innocuous challenge.  The visitors had a great chance to pull a goal back as Henderson hit a dangerous free-kick, but it was headed well wide by Benteke.  Flores made his second substitution replacing Abdi with Behrami.  At this point, my sister told me that she’d checked her heart rate and found it was 134 bpm.  Ighalo kindly calmed us all down as he won the ball, played it to Deeney, who found Behrami who crossed for the Nigerian to head home and seal the win.  Once I had stopped screaming, I started bouncing and was amused as I looked around the ground to see the Lower GT, the SEJ stand and, unbelievably, the Upper GT all bouncing.  The Upper GT??  Seriously, where were the stewards?  Flores made a final change bringing Guedioura on for Igahlo who went off to a standing ovation.  The game finished with the Rookery singing ‘We’re all going on a European tour.’

Flores with one of his goalscorers

Flores with one of his goalscorers

The final whistle sparked huge celebrations.  We were all looking at each other, not quite believing what we had just witnessed.  Not only had we beaten Liverpool 3-0, but it had been such a convincing performance that the margin could have been higher.  Suddenly I found there were tears in my eyes.  My niece, Amelia, was laughing at me, but it was she who had prompted the tears.  I have always felt really lucky that I watched Watford playing in the first division in the 80s when we went out every week expecting to get a result.  The thought that the youngsters following Watford now, such as Amelia, would never experience what we did has saddened me.  But this afternoon, it felt like 1982 all over again.

Back to the West Herts where the smiles were so wide, that I don’t know how some of them got through the door.  But the reflections were on a great win against a Liverpool team that was very poor or, at least, that we made to look very poor.  Every Watford player deserved plaudits, they all did their jobs and worked their socks off.  No Liverpool player who got the ball was given time to work with it.  The visitors were comprehensively beaten.

We go into Christmas, a point off the Champions League places and 13 points off the relegation zone after a string of performances that mean that we need fear nobody.  These truly are the good old days.

To all you lovely people who read my reports, I wish you a very happy Christmas and a wonderful 2016.