Tag Archives: Nathaniel Chalobah

Beating Spurs after 30 Years

Capoue hits a shot

After our terrific start to the season, the game against Spurs had to be considered as a free hit and I have to confess that I travelled without either hope or expectation of anything from the game.  The travelling part had challenges with a strike on South West Railways, the closure of Euston and a partial closure of the Metropolitan line.  But, despite my concerns, it turned out to be an easy enough journey and, in contrast to last week, the walk to the West Herts was in blazing sunshine.  When I arrived, the food service had not yet begun, but I put in my order for the jerk chicken.  It took about an hour and a half to arrive, but was well worth the wait.  Last week had been more of a barbecue version, this week it came fresh from the grill with proper jerk seasonings and a good helping of rice and peas.  Just gorgeous.  We noticed that the clock in the club was an hour slow, which helped us with the 4pm kick-off as we just kept to our usual matchday schedule.

Team news was that Gracia had stuck with the same team for the fourth league game in a row, so the starting line-up was Foster; Holebas, Kabasele, Cathcart, Janmaat; Pereyra, Capoue, Doucouré, Hughes; Deeney, Gray.

Cathcart, Deeney and Hughes

Tottenham launched an early attack as Kane found Lucas in the box, but Kabasele continued his great performance from last week with a lovely saving tackle.  With little in the way of action on the field early in the game, the 1881 amused themselves with a chant of “Milton Keynes, you’re having a laugh” in reference to the fact that Spurs have applied to stage our League Cup game at the stadium that must not be mentioned (booooo).  The next chance for the visitors came as Alli got on to the end of a long pass from Alderweireld which he headed over both Foster and the bar.  Then Janmaat crossed for Deeney but, again, the header was over the bar.  Tottenham threatened again as a through ball released Lucas but Kabasele was on hand to disrupt and Foster was able to gather the ball.  There was another chance for the visitors as Foster failed to control a cross from Eriksen, Kabasele’s attempted clearance fell to Lucas but the shot was well wide of the target.  Then a free kick was played back to Eriksen whose through ball was turned just wide by Alli, who was offside anyway.  A corner from Eriksen was headed clear to Davies whose shot flew wide.  Tottenham’s final chance of the half came from a Vertonghen cross that was headed over by Sánchez.  In time added on, Watford finally launched another attack, but Deeney’s shot from distance was weak and easily gathered by Vorm.  So we reached half time with the game goalless due to a decent defensive performance by the Hornets who had restricted the opposition’s chances without posing much of a threat themselves.

Celebrating Deeney’s goal with the camera in the way

The half time interview was with Ben Wilmot, still basking in the glory of his magnificent performance against Reading in midweek.  I look forward to seeing him develop as, at 18, he already appears to have Cathcart levels of assurance, which is a great thing.

The first chance of the second half fell to Eriksen, whose shot just missed the target.  The Dane had another chance soon after, but his shot from distance was easy for Foster.  The first booking of the game went to Capoue for pulling back Vertonghen.  The visitors took the lead in the 53rd minute. It was a scrappy goal that took a deflection off Doucouré and flew past Foster.  There was a certain inevitability to the goal and we settled back to witness the defeat that was sure to come.  But the players were of a completely different mindset and the goal seemed to galvanise them into action.  First Gray hit a powerful shot that was just over the bar.  Then Deeney hit a shot across goal that took a deflection off Vertonghen before coming back off the inside of the post.  So close!  Spurs were rattled and Dembélé went into the referee’s book for pulling down Hughes.  Holebas took the resulting free kick which was met by Deeney who powered the header home to level the game and send the Rookery wild.

Celebrating Cathcart’s goal (with no sign of Cathcart)

Gracia made an immediate substitution bringing Success on for Gray, I have to say that I wasn’t convinced that this was the correct move.  What do I know?  Watford continued to threaten as Janmaat crossed for Pereyra who headed the ball just wide.  Watford’s second goal came from another assist by Holebas, this time from corner and it was Cathcart who rose to head home.  I love Cathcart.  He calmly gets on with his job in defence, never drawing attention to himself until he pops up in the opposition box to put the Hornets into the lead against one of the best teams in the country.  Spurs made their first substitution replacing Alderweireld with Llorente.  They had a decent chance to strike back through Eriksen who tried a shot from distance, but Foster was equal to it.  Into the last five minutes of the game and there was a substitute for each side as Hughes made way for Chalobah, a change that was greeted with loud cheers for both players, and Winks replaced Dembélé for the visitors.  From the Rookery, I was convinced that Spurs had scored from their next attempt, but Kane’s header had flown over the bar and hit the outside of the net.  Each side made a final change with Rose coming on for Davies and Mariappa replacing Pereyra.  In the last minute of time added on, Spurs won a free kick in a dangerous position.  My heart was pounding as it was taken and there were loud cheers as it deflected for a corner.  The cheers were even louder when the corner dropped to Rose and he belted the shot well over the bar.

The return of Chalobah to Vicarage Road

The final whistle was greeted with a roar from all the stands.  Elton and his boys were celebrating in the Upper GT and we were all joining Capoue in a celebratory dance.  Deeney won a well-deserved man of the match award.  It is only a couple of months since a number of Watford fans were saying that he was past his sell-by date.  How wrong they were, we wouldn’t be without him now.  It was a terrific team effort and, based on the second half performance, we thoroughly deserved the win.

As one who was lucky enough to live through the first GT era, I can be a bit blasé about these results, after all I have seen us beat Spurs 5-1 at White Hart Lane.  But reading the reactions of my Watford friends to this result shows how much this means.  Watford are currently joint top of the table with 100% record and looking like a team who will be a tough prospect for anyone this season.

Taylor, Rostron and Cox – the three Captains

It was all smiles as we met up after the game.  But there was only time for a quick drink and then it was to the Palace Theatre for the first Tales from the Vicarage Captains evening.  It was much more low-key than some previous events, but an absolute joy to hear Wilf Rostron speak.  I had heard that he had fallen out of love with football, so it was lovely to hear him speak so warmly of his time at Watford and the way that he, and particularly his wife, Jill, had been welcomed to the club.  Obviously, the sending off that meant he missed the Cup Final came up, but he is philosophical about that now (I am not, angry tears were still pricking my eyes as he spoke).  He looks incredibly fit and said that (at 61) he plays in an over-40s league.  Similarly, Les Taylor says that he achieved all of his footballing dreams at Watford, including leading the team out at Wembley in place of Rostron.  His talk of hitting the Watford Observer clock made me smile as I remembered his shooting exploits.  Neil Cox had a more challenging time, not seeing eye to eye with either GT or Vialli, but he will always be remembered as being the captain that convinced his players to agree to a wage deferral when the club were in trouble.  Graham Simpson did not come out of that one well as he tried to avoid paying the players back the money they were owed.  A reminder of less pleasant times at the club.  As always, it was a wonderful evening that evoked many happy memories.

Jose Holebas, my new hero

Since the Pozzo take-over and the influx of players from all over the World we have often been told by those outside the club that these “foreigners” don’t care about the club or the fans and this is not the Watford that we all grew up with.  On social media on Sunday night, there were two examples that showed that this is far from the truth.  First was a video of Roberto Pereyra meeting a young fan with Down syndrome.  To see Roberto interacting with this youngster brought tears to my eyes.  He may not speak a lot of English, but his actions spoke volumes and the boy was beaming.  Then I saw that young Lexe Allaway had received Jose Holebas’s shirt after the game.  When her Mum was asked how this had come about, it seems that they had met a day before the Palace game and Jose had said he would meet her after that game to give her his shirt. True to his word he met her, but as he had scored from that ‘cross’ he asked Lexe if she minded if he kept the shirt.  Of course, she was more than happy for him to have it after his wonderful goal, and he promised that she could have his shirt the following week.  Her Mum warned her that he may well have forgotten a week later. Instead, true to his word, he waited for her after the match, handed her the shirt and made time to chat to her about her football.  Jose has a (well-deserved) reputation for being a miserable so-and-so, but to show such kindness to a young fan is a measure of the man and he has gone way up in my estimation.

I grew up supporting a wonderful club that gave us many happy memories on the pitch, but was a club where the fans were treated well and appreciated by the players.  I am so delighted that, even though football has changed massively over the past 30 years, the current generation of youngsters are having the same experiences that we did.  Watford truly is a special club.

 

The Youngsters Shine Against the Royals

So good to see Chalobah back from injury

I was rather pleased when the draw for the second round of the League Cup gave us a trip to Reading as it is almost a home game for me.  Even more so when the game was scheduled for Wednesday evening as I was already planning to work from home due to a dental check-up in Maidenhead in the afternoon.  I always have a chat about football with my dentist, who is really an Arsenal fan but used to be a Reading Season Ticket holder who gave up going because the team were hopeless.  We chatted about the game and he warned that they may cause us problems.  I assured him that, given our recent history in this cup, I was taking nothing for granted.  Once he gave me the all clear, I was on my way to Reading where I was in the pre-match pub far too early, although not as early as the chap in the Watford shirt who was already sitting in the corner.  I bought myself a lovely real cider and then found a little booth to hide away in and wait for the rest of my party who arrived in due course.

On arrival at the ground, the bag search was being undertaken by a woman whose main concern seemed to be to find some goodies that could be shared with her.  It always makes the day a bit nicer when the stewards have a sense of humour.  As our pre-match pub is excellent for beer but doesn’t serve food, I had a chicken balti pie inside the ground that I have to say was very good indeed.  While waiting for kick-off, Sweet Caroline was played which apparently is a Reading favourite but made me a little homesick for Fenway Park.

Prodl lines up a free kick

Team news was that Gracia had made 11 changes with debuts for Navarro, Masina, Wilmot and Quina and the return of Chalobah, so the starting line-up was Gomes; Navarro, Mariappa, Prödl, Masina; Femenía, Chalobah, Wilmot, Quina, Sema; Success.  I have to say that looked like a pretty decent team.  Reading had also made 8 changes, but the main Watford connection with the opposition was in the dug out in the person of Sir Nigel Gibbs.

The first chance of the game came from a Navarro free kick from distance that was an easy save for Walker in the Reading goal.  Early in the game there was a switch in formation to three at the back with Wilmot in the middle and Navarro and Masina playing as wing backs.  Watford’s next chance also came from a free kick from Chalobah that just cleared the bar.  From a corner, Femenía played the ball back into the box where it was parried and fell to Mariappa whose shot was blocked before Wilmot tried a cheeky back heel that was cleared.  Young Wilmot was having an impressive start and he was soon in action at the other end of the pitch cutting out a dangerous ball into the box.  The first chance for the home side came in the 23rd minute as Watford failed to clear a cross into their box allowing McNulty to volley over the bar.  Then Watford launched a great break, Success got to the byline and put in a low cross, but nobody was there to take advantage.  Soon after, a corner from Sema reached Femenía who played it in to Success whose shot missed the target.  He wasn’t to make the same mistake a minute later as Masina played the ball back to him, he took one touch and then finished past Walker.  Reading had a chance to break back from a free kick which was launched over the wall, but Gomes dropped to make an easy catch.  So Watford reached half time a goal to the good and looking uncharacteristically comfortable.

Celebrating Quina’s magnificent strike

Reading made a change at the break bringing Sims on for Swift.  The second half started with a decent chance for the Hornets.  After a fast break, Navarro crossed for Success who headed just over the bar.  Soon after, the Watford striker had another chance to increase the lead, this time from a Masina cross, but he nodded wide.  The travelling Hornets were in good voice and a lovely bit of skill from Quina was greeted with an appreciative chorus of “sexy football”.  There was a decent chance to get a second as Chalobah played a lovely ball for Femenía to run on to, but the shot was blocked by the Reading keeper.  The second Watford goal was a thing of beauty, the ball was cleared to Quina outside the box, he advanced a couple of steps and then took the advice of the bloke standing behind me who was yelling ‘hit it’ and powered a rocket into the top corner.  It was quite a strike. There were changes for both sides soon after as Baldock and former Watford youngster Yiadom came on for O’Shea and Richards for the home side.  For the Hornets, Sema made way for Okaka.  The Watford substitute had an immediate chance to get on the score sheet as he got on the end of a looping cross from Femenía, but his glancing header was wide of the target.  There was a rare chance for the home side as a ball dropped to Kelly inside the box, but he hit it over the bar.  Quina’s enjoyable debut came to an end as he was replaced by Doucouré.  He looked shattered as he left to field to an ovation from the travelling Hornets.  Watford were still pushing to extend their lead as a shot from Navarro was pushed over the bar.  At the other end McNulty lobbed Gomes, but Mariappa was back to clear the ball.  Reading threatened again with a decent shot from distance from Méïté, but Gomes was down to make the save.  Watford’s final change saw Hughes come on for Chalobah, it was so great to see him back in action and managing almost 90 minutes.  Reading had one last chance to reduce the deficit from a free kick, but the shot was easily caught by Gomes.

Gomes back in goal

So, in the end, it was a convincing and comfortable win for the Hornets.  The second string put in a very good performance which gives a pleasing indication of the strength of the squad.  Of the new guys, Wilmot was the most impressive, looking very assured in the middle of the back three.  The other youngster, Quina, made some lovely touches and his goal was a worldie.  These two look to have very promising futures.  It was also a delight to see Chalobah back on the pitch and putting in a great shift for almost the entire 90 minutes.  He was beaming as he responded to the chants of “Chalobah, my lord” after the final whistle.

Also, fair play to the 2514 fans who travelled to the game.  It is not a long journey but, given our recent record in this competition, they would have travelled more in hope than expectation, so thoroughly deserved that win.

We have Spurs next in both the league and the cup.  I don’t expect anything from either game, but if this team continues to perform as they have so far this season, we are in for a rather enjoyable season.

Handbags and Glad Rags at the End of the Season

Don and I with the Player of the Season

On Thursday, Watford held the End of Season dinner.  I must say that I don’t enjoy Wembley as a venue, it feels as though you are having dinner in an aircraft hangar and the event has lost its friendly feel.  On the plus side, for the first time in three years the head coach was in attendance.  I managed to have a brief chat with Javi, who said what a lovely family we were at Watford.  On the family theme, it was really lovely to see Rita Taylor there with her daughter and grandchildren.  The youngsters were on the stage to help present the Player of the Season award which is named in honour of GT.  There was no surprise when Doucouré won the award and I can confirm that he is a lovely chap.  As, indeed, is Christian Kabasele, who was the Community Ambassador of the year.  The Hall of Fame inductee was Tom Walley, not before time.  He was joined on the evening by a number of his ‘graduates’.  Robert Page and Kenny Jackett both paid warm tribute to him and his part in making them into the players/managers/men that they are.  Tom’s acceptance speech was brief but heartfelt.

The winning team

On Saturday was the Legends game in aid of the 25th anniversary of the Community Sports and Education Trust.  It was a foul day with the rain lashing down but, as I entered the ground, I was cheered to see Tom Walley waiting for the lift to the concourse.  I went up to him to say how happy I was that he had received the Hall of Fame accolade.  I was rewarded with a smile, a kiss and “Football has been good to me.”  I pointed out that he had been very good to football.  The game ranged from the sublime to the ridiculous.  But it was lovely to see Lloyd Doyley, Nicky Wright, Allan Smart, Steve Palmer, Gavin Mahon, Marcus Gayle and Derek Payne gracing the Vicarage Road pitch again.  The teams were managed by Luther Blissett and Kenny Jackett.  Luther played a cameo at the end and ended up as the manager of the winning team.

After the Legends game, I headed up to Manchester for Sunday’s match.  When I arrived at the pre-match pub there was already a couple of Northern based Hornets at ‘our’ table.  The team usually travel to the ground from the hotel opposite the pub, so we waved them off from the comfort of our seats.  Not that they saw us, but it is the thought that counts.  Our pre-match group was honoured to be joined by Emma Saunders, Watford’s matchday announcer, who was being a fan for the day.

Cuddling lovely Christian Kabasele

We left the pub in plenty of time to deal with the extensive security measures that are always in place at Old Trafford.  Being aware of the restrictions, I had left my rucksack and laptop in the hotel and arrived at the ground with only my essentials.  We passed through the first cordon and had our bags checked with no issues.  Then we arrived at the next phalanx of stewards to be told that no bags were allowed in the ground “because of what happened in Paris last night.”  So, a madman with a knife on the streets of Paris meant that middle-aged women could no longer be trusted to bring handbags into a football stadium.  Mick Smithers, our Police liaison officer, was in the vicinity, so we asked whether he would mind our bags, but we were given no choice but to walk to a car park across the road to dispose of the offending items.  The bag drop that had been designated for away fans was already full.  We asked what we were supposed to do now and were directed to another portacabin that was barely visible in the distance.  On arrival, I emptied my bag of most of its contents and transferred them to my pockets and basically left my make-up bag behind.  When we arrived back at the turnstiles, there was a quick check with a wand and we were in.  It would have been a lot simpler and more secure to have examined the contents of my small bag as they had no idea what was in my rather large pockets.

Pereyra on the ball

Due to our diversion, I arrived at my seat just as the pre-match handshakes were taking place.  I then did my usual thing of getting my notebook, pen and camera ready for the game.  As I retrieved things from my coat pocket, I realised that I had completely forgotten to transfer a pen from my bag and nobody else in our party had one, so I was unable to make any notes on the game, which is probably as well as it was not a game packed with incident.

Team news was that Gracia had made three changes from the Newcastle game with Gomes, Deulofeu and Richarlison coming in for Karnezis, Capoue and Deeney.  So the starting line-up was Gomes; Janmaat, Cathcart, Kabasele, Holebas; Doucouré, Hughes; Deulofeu, Pereyra, Richarlison; Gray.  The return of Gomes to the team meant that he would make his 100th Premier League appearance for the Hornets and would be wearing the captain’s armband as he did so.  There was also much joy among the travelling fans when it was confirmed that Chalobah would be on the bench after so long out due to injury.

Heurelho Gomes making his 100th Premier League appearance for the Hornets

The first chance of the game fell to the Hornets as Romero dropped a cross from Janmaat which, for a moment, looked as though it may drift in to the goal, but there was no Watford player on hand to take advantage and the United goalie was able to recover.  The first caution was earned by Rojo for a foul on Richarlison.  The young Brazilian took the resultant free kick himself but sent it well over the bar.  The home side had their first chance of note in the 16th minute when Sanchez received a pass from Blind, but volleyed well wide of the target.  Gracia was forced into an early substitution when Kabasele ushered a ball out of play and, as he followed it, the momentum took him down the slope behind the goal and he collided with the hoardings.  Christian tried to continue after receiving treatment, but soon had to be replaced by Mariappa.  I was just hoping that this didn’t end his chance of being involved in the World Cup.  United took the lead in the 34th minute with a goal that came out of nothing as Carrick played a ball over the top to Mata, who appeared to be in an offside position, he squared for Rashford who had a simple finish past Gomes.  The Hornets should have grabbed an equaliser just before half time as Richarlison met a cross from Janmaat and headed back across goal, but Romero pulled off a terrific save to frustrate the Watford youngster.  The resulting corner reached Deulofeu who tried a shot, but Romero was also equal to that effort.  So we reached half time with the Hornets slightly unfortunate to be a goal down.

Deeney and Pereyra challenging in the United box

The first incident of note in the second half was a caution for Ashley Young after a foul on Janmaat.  Sadly, following his unpleasant celebration after scoring against the Hornets at Vicarage Road, the former Watford youngster was being booed every time he touched the ball.  Pereyra took the free-kick, which bounced off Mariappa and the home defence were able to clear.  Soon after, Young was replaced by Luke Shaw.  Gracia also made a change bringing Deeney on for Deulofeu and switching to two up front.  United had a chance to increase their lead as Sanchez crossed to the back post, but the ball was too high for Mata. There was another card for the home side as McTominay was penalised for a shirt pull on Richarlison.  There appeared to be a terrific chance for the Hornets as a poor clearance bounced off Hughes who found Gray, who had a great chance to finish but took one touch too many and ended up putting the ball wide.  His blushes were spared as the flag was up for offside, but it was a terrible miss.  There were loud cheers from the travelling Hornets as Chalobah appeared on the touchline ready to take the field, which he did in place of Gray.  United then made their second substitution bringing Herrera on for Blind.  With 10 minutes remaining, Watford had a terrific chance to score an equaliser as Richarlison ran into the box but, again, waited too long to take a shot and was tackled.  The last half chance for the visitors came as a deep corner from Holebas was met by a header by Doucouré, but it was weak and easily gathered by Romero.  With five minutes remaining, Michael Carrick, who was making his last appearance before retiring, was substituted (for Paul Pogba) to allow him to enjoy an ovation from the United fans.  The Watford faithful joined in with the applause.  And that was it, there were no further goals and the game finished with a narrow win for United.

So happy to see Chalobah back on the pitch

At the final whistle, the Watford players applauded the crowd and Adrian Mariappa came over to give his shirt to one of the fans in the disabled area.  The stewards on the pitch stepped in to stop him and it took all of his charm to persuade them that this action was not a security issue.  The joy on the face of the woman who received the shirt as she held it aloft in triumph made the stewards’ action look as mean spirited as it was.  It was also noticeable how few home fans were left in the ground to applaud their team’s efforts this season.  I guess that finishing second in the league getting to the Cup Final isn’t worthy of celebration in this part of Manchester, nor is saying goodbye to a long serving player.  So very sad, but Old Trafford seems primarily to be a tourist destination these days.

As we headed back to pick up our bags, I encountered Don Fraser, so pushed his wheelchair back to Coach 1.  We proceeded in the direction of the bag drop only to find that there was a barrier in the way and a steward directing us back the way we had come.  Our expressions of indignation persuaded him to let us through and, thankfully, we were soon on our way.

Gathering in the box for a corner

So it was back to the pub for the last post-match analysis of the season.  It has to be said that it wasn’t a great game.  The home side appeared to be playing in second gear while they looked forward to the Cup Final next week.  Watford, as so often this season, put in a decent performance but, as a friend commented, were “pathologically opposed to shooting.”  United did defend well, but if an early shot had been taken on a couple of occasions, Romero may have had a more difficult afternoon.  It has been a very odd season.  It started with some superb performances, but started petering out once Silva received the approach from Everton and, despite moments of brilliance, never regained any momentum.  While 14th in the division is something that most of us would have been happy with at the start of the season, it does feel like the team has massively underachieved given the talent in the squad.  Certainly the absence of Cleverley and Chalobah through injury for much of the season has had an effect on performances, but the main problem has been the lack of an effective striker and they are not easy to come by.

But, frustrating as this season has been, I will be counting the days until the fixtures come out so that I can plan next year’s adventures.

Thank you to all of you who have read my reports this season.  I wish you all a wonderful Summer.

 

Watford Thrashed by Relentless City

Tony Coton and Don Fraser

For the second week running there was a Watford related event on Friday night.  This time it was Tony Coton’s book launch at the Vic.  Due to the fire disrupting trains on the Euston-Watford line, I had opted to travel to Watford on the Met line, so was running later than planned.  The room was packed when I arrived, but I had been saved a seat in a prime position, so was very grateful to my more punctual friends.  The main event had Rich Walker asking Tony a number of questions about his younger days and there were some great stories.  I was highly amused to hear that the only game his Mum ever saw was against Southampton as she loved Kevin Keegan.  It was really lovely to see that the front cover of his book featured Tony in a Watford shirt.  He said that he had insisted on that as it was his happiest time in football.  At the break, Tony went around the room signing everybody’s books.  He was then given some respite as Steve Harrison took the mic.  No interview for Steve, this was stand-up comedy and he was hilarious.  Tom Walley was also in attendance, it was so lovely to see him.  Mick Harford also made a guest appearance, and some brave Watford souls even went over to talk to him!  Hearing Steve Harrison tell Don that he was his hero for following the Hornets all over the place made my heart swell with joy.   It was a top evening. and yet another one that made me so happy and proud to be a Hornet.

Zachary and Elijah Furnish-John among the Watford mascots

After the fun of the night before, Saturday morning came far too soon.  My cousin, Doreen, who was visiting from New Zealand, had decided to join us for the game.  As my niece was heading to university, her season ticket was going spare, so Doreen took her ticket, so at least there was a familiar face in Amelia’s seat.  I had arranged to meet Doreen at the West Herts.  I wasn’t expecting her to be quite so keen, so was a little shocked to get a message while I was still in the hotel to say she had arrived before the doors had opened.  Somehow, I managed to get her and Don to meet so that, when I arrived, they were happily sat at our usual table.  It was a pleasure to introduce her to the pre-match experience and the West Herts crew were their usual delightful selves.

Team news was two changes enforced by injury with Janmaat and Mariappa coming in for Kaboul and Femenía.  So the starting line-up was Gomes; Janmaat, Mariappa, Kabasele, Holebas; Chalobah, Doucouré; Carrillo, Cleverley, Richarlison; Gray.

I had heard that Elton John was at the game and, among the mascots, were his boys, Zachary and Elijah.  A fact that Elton announced in an Instagram posting, as proud as any Watford fan on such a momentous occasion.

Gray, Cleverley and Doucoure wishing they could escape the rain

The game started as it would go on with a series of attacks from the visitors.  A couple of off target efforts were followed by a shot from distance by Fernandinho that Gomes dived to save.  At this point the heavens opened and a number of people (mostly young lads) from the first few rows of the Rookery vacated their seats to take cover further up the stand.  This led us grumpy old folk to mutter about the youth of today and how, in our day, we stood for 90 minutes in torrential rain and liked it!  Back on the pitch, De Bruyne played a one-two with Silva before shooting wide.  Watford finally had a sniff of the City goal but Richarlison’s shot was weak and easily saved.  Doucouré found himself in a great position to open the scoring, but his shot was way off target, his embarrassment slightly tempered as the ball bounced off Kabasele so that it ended up flying not too far wide of the goal.  At the other end, Aguero lifted a shot onto the roof of the net.  Then Sterling broke into the box, but Kabasele made a brilliant tackle to prevent the shot.  There was a brief moment of hope for the Hornets as the ball bounced off Otamendi and it appeared that Gray would break clear, but the ball ran away from him to safety.  City threatened again from a corner which reached Aguero who volleyed wide of the near post.  There was a worrying moment as Janmaat flew to head the ball clear and his head made contact with a City player.  He needed treatment for some time, but he’s hard as nails and was soon back on the pitch.

Janmaat challenges Jesus

Watford had an excellent chance to take the lead as a free-kick from Holebas was met by the head of Richarlison, but his effort flew just wide of the target.  Three minutes later the visitors took the lead from a similar situation as Aguero headed De Bruyne’s delivery past Gomes.  Normal service resumed on the discipline front as Holebas was booked for a late foul on De Bruyne.  City were two up on the half hour.  Silva’s cross should have been stopped before it reached Aguero who had a simple tap in for his brace.  The third goal came on 38 minutes, Watford fans were shouting for a foul in the build-up, that wasn’t given, allowing Aguero to find Jesus who appeared to be offside before he finished past Gomes.  A Watford fan in the Lower GT had had enough of the questionable decisions by the linesman on that side and ran down to the perimeter to tell him exactly what he thought.  A steward came over to have a word, but the bloke finished his rant and returned to his seat with applause ringing in his ears.  A rare moment of pleasure in this game came as the big screen showed Elton in the stands, there was warm applause from the Watford fans, which he acknowledged with a wave and a big smile.  Watford had a chance to break back before half time as a ball was played into the City box but the City keeper, Ederson, arrived before Gray, so we reached the break with a three goal deficit.

Steve Harrison and Tom Walley

The respite of half time was welcome.  Steve Harrison was the guest drawing the 50-50 tickets and spoke glowingly of his friend, Graham Taylor.  Then a nice moment as Dion Pereira and Andrew Eleftheriou were awarded match balls for making their Premier League debuts as players who had come through the Academy.  I do hope we see a lot more of these lads in the future.

After the battering of the first half, it was very gratifying that the first chance of the second half fell to the Hornets as Holebas put in a lovely cross, Gray was unable to connect, but the ball came out to Carrillo who shot just wide.  Watford fans were screaming for a penalty as Chalobah was kicked in the box (that is not a euphemism), but the referee decided that there was no infringement, a decision that young Nathaniel challenged but his arguments were given short shrift.  Watford had another chance from a corner, but Richarlison headed it over the bar.  City’s next chance came from a back heel to David Silva whose shot was tipped over impressively by Gomes.  But the relief was short-lived as the corner to the far post was headed home by Otamendi.  At this point, I groaned, “Please make it stop,” but there was still 25 minutes to go.

Chalobah, Mariappa and Carrillo gather for a corner

There were substitutions for both teams as Jesus and De Bruyne were replaced by Bernardo Silva and Gündoğan for the visitors, Pereyra and Capoue came on for Cleverley and Chalobah for the Hornets.  Watford had a great chance to pull one back as a corner was flicked on to Capoue who headed agonisingly wide.  Marco Silva made his final substitution with 15 minutes to go bringing Deeney on for Gray.  City’s fifth came after a run by Aguero, there was a brief hope that his shot had been cleared off the line by Mariappa, but the referee signalled the goal, Aguero had his hat trick and City were five goals to the good.  At this point, many in the home crowd started streaming out.  My neighbour in the Rookery said we had better get Amelia back from university.  City were not satisfied with only five goals and Sterling had a chance to increase the score but shot just wide.  Fair play to the home fans at this point as a loud chant of “Since I was young ….” emanated from the Rookery, including those around me, who aren’t always the loudest.  It wasn’t going to get any better for the Hornets, Sterling was tripped in the box and the referee pointed to the spot.  Sterling took the penalty himself and made no mistake.  They could have had a seventh in time added on but a great shot from Aguero was met by an equally great save from Gomes.

Holebas delivers a corner

At the end of the game, Silva had a long talk with both the referee and the linesman from the GT side.  The players looked despondent, but Gomes, despite the disappointment of having conceded six goals, still did his usual lap of the pitch acknowledging the crowd.  Doreen was very impressed at this show of character.

It was a sombre group that gathered to drown our sorrows at the West Herts.  Before the game I had said that this one was a free hit, but it is never pleasant to see your team so soundly beaten.  It really should be a joy watching players as good as City’s, but it isn’t when you care so much about the opposition.  There was no anger or bitterness from our crew though.  Sometimes you are beaten by the better team and City were truly remarkable.  Their passing was precise, but it was their breaking at pace that took your breath away.  They were also completely relentless, characterised by the fact that they were still attacking in time added on, despite being six goals ahead.  Contrasts were made with the 5-0 defeat to the same team at the end of last season.  That had been an abject performance by the Hornets, but this was not.  We were well beaten, but the team did try to give it a go.  Watford have improved considerably since last season, but so have City and, on this showing, there will be a few more teams on the end of hidings from them this season.

So we just have to put this one behind us and concentrate on putting in good performances against Swansea and West Brom.  Those are the games from which we need to get points, and I will travel with optimism.  I hope it is not misplaced.

Quality and Resilience Lead to Three Points on the South Coast

Chalobah on the ball

The Friday night before this game there was a Tales from the Vicarage event featuring John Barnes.  While Watford fans have nothing but admiration for Barnesy as a player, it has been a source of irritation to some that he rarely acknowledges his time at Watford in interviews.  Also, previous events have featured a number of players, so this would be a completely different animal and I wasn’t sure what to expect.  It turned out to be a lovely evening.  John spoke with a great deal of affection about his time at Watford.  Particularly striking was his huge admiration for Graham Taylor who, it appeared, he would have trusted with his life.  I was very surprised to hear about nights out with Tony Coton, Mick Harford and Noel Blake as they seemed unlikely drinking buddies.  There was a Hornet Heaven episode that referred to a banner than I distinctly remember from Cup Final day (and I now know the person behind the banner).  The evening ended with a recreation of some old photos with fans, which was hilarious, and a performance of the rap from World in Motion that brought the house down.

I stayed overnight in Watford after the evening at the Palace.  As I was leaving on Saturday morning, I followed a man into the lift.  When he turned to face me, I realised that it was Adam Leventhal, so we had a chat about what a good evening it had been and I was able to thank him (again) for the events.

Carrillo and Femenia

Having caught an early train from Watford, I met Jacque at Waterloo only to find that a points failure meant that the train we were aiming for was cancelled.  This had the knock-on effect that the following train was heaving.  There were then added delays due to someone trespassing on the track.  It felt as though we would never arrive, so it was a relief when we finally reached the pre-match pub and enjoyed a beer (or two) with our party.  As we left to walk to the ground, the sky darkened and the heavens opened.  We found ourselves sheltering from the worst of the shower under a tree, but were already soaked to the skin.  Thankfully, it eased off and we arrived at St Mary’s, soggy, but in plenty of time for kick-off.

Team news was that there were three (enforced) changes from the draw with Brighton as Kaboul, Holebas and Carrillo came in for Prödl (injured), Britos (suspended) and Amrabat (departed).  So the starting line-up was Gomes; Femenía, Kaboul, Kabasele, Holebas; Chalobah, Doucouré; Carrillo, Cleverley, Richarlison; Gray

Doucoure beaming after scoring against Southampton

There was a really lively start to the game.  The Hornets were dominating and playing some really good football, but without creating any real chances.  The first goal attempt came from a free kick from Holebas that flew just wide of the near post.  Prior to the game, we had been told that a young Saints fan called Jamie Isherwood had passed away in the previous week after a heart attack and the home fans were planning to have a minute’s applause in the 22nd minute.  As the applause started among the home fans, it was good to see that the message had reached the travelling Hornets who joined in in numbers, although we may have become a little distracted from the tribute when Richarlison beat a couple of defenders before having a shot blocked by Stephens.  As the half progressed, there was some concern that our lovely forward play was not translating into shots so, when the ball fell to Doucouré outside the box, Mike’s instruction was, “Just whack it.”  He did and it flew past Forster into the net to send the Watford fans into delirium and the Saints fans to the bars for their half time refreshments.  Having been shot shy for most of the half, the Hornets had a couple of decent chances to increase their lead before half time.  First a terrific shot from the edge of the area by Richarlison was deflected into the side netting.  Then a lovely passing move finished with Doucouré on the edge of the area, any hopes of a repeat of his goal were dashed when he blasted the ball over the bar.  In the final action of the half, some dogged persistence from Gray won a corner, the delivery found its way to Cleverley whose shot was blocked.

Gray and Chalobah congratulate Janmaat on his superb strike

We reached half time very satisfied with the afternoon’s entertainment so far.  It had been a terrific first half and the Hornets thoroughly deserved their lead.

Watford had an early chance to increase the lead in the second half as Richarlison played the ball back to Chalobah, but his shot was straight at Forster in the Southampton goal.  The home side then threatened with a shot from Bertrand that was blocked at close range by Kaboul.  A promising ball over the top reached Gray, but he was unable to escape the attentions of the defence and was tackled before he could shoot.  Carrillo did really well to win a corner, the delivery from Holebas was deep and reached Chalobah whose shot was blocked.  Southampton’s best chance of the game so far came as Boufal got himself into a great position, but his shot was well over the bar.  Then Stephens received a ball in the box and looked sure to score when Kabasele appeared out of nowhere to make a wonderful saving tackle.  On the hour Silva was forced to make two substitutions as both Kaboul and Femenía had to leave the game due to injuries, they were replaced by Mariappa and Janmaat.  The Dutchman made his mark on the game almost immediately.  I am ashamed to say that, when the ball fell to him outside the area, my reaction was “What’s he shooting from there for?”  I felt like a complete fool when his terrific strike hit the net.  The second goal certainly settled nerves in the away end as the home side were having their best spell of the game.  There were still 24 minutes of the match remaining at this point, but the home fans started heading for the exits.

Carrillo and Doucoure

Watford’s final substitution came with 6 minutes remaining as Deeney replaced Gray, who had looked more comfortable than in previous games but had not troubled the Southampton keeper.  Watford continued to push for another goal.  First Richarlison ran into the box, but waited too long to shoot and was stopped by a tackle.  Then Carrillo tried a shot from distance that flew over the bar.  At the other end a shot from Davis was stopped by a flying header from Mariappa.  Southampton had their first shot on target in time added on at the end of the game, the shot from Cedric appeared to be heading for the top corner when Gomes came flying across to pluck the ball out of the air.  The Hornets should have had a third, and it would have been a contender for goal of the season, as Carrillo turned to beat a player on the wing, as he advanced towards the goal he beat two more players before shooting just wide of the target.  It was one of those chances that should be awarded a goal just for the magnificent build-up.  The final whistle went on a convincing win and I was grinning like a Cheshire Cat.

Silva looks concerned as Janmaat takes a throw-in

After the game each encounter with a fellow Horn started with “How good was that?”  Watford had completely dominated the game against a team that I would consider to be one of our main competitors.  The midfield had been magnificent, yet again, but the defence had done a sterling job and deserve special praise for the fact that they continued to hold Southampton at bay after two enforced changes with 30 minutes to go.  Carrillo’s first start was very impressive, from battling for the ball to win a corner to a sublime move that really should have been awarded a goal.  If he continues in this manner, he will become a firm favourite.  But the most impressive aspect of the game was that we saw wonderful skill accompanied by immense work rate throughout the team.  Not one of the players was going to allow the opposition time on the ball, and that time was limited as the passing between the Watford players was so accurate.  This was a truly impressive showing, worthy of the 82-83 team that starred John Barnes and there can be no higher praise from me than that.

 

Watford Earn a Point as Britos Sees Red

Femenia takes a throw in

Pre-match in the West Herts was unusually quiet, the bank holiday weekend clearly meaning that many regulars had made alternative plans.  Before arriving, I had received a text from Don to tell me that there was hot food available and that the menu included jerk chicken.  In fact, they were offering jerk chicken in a roll at a bargain price and it was absolutely gorgeous.  My new favourite pre-match lunch.  As we enjoyed our pints, the televisions were showing Bournemouth vs. Manchester City.  The animosity that has developed between the Hornets and the Cherries was clearly shown when City scored a 96th minute winner and the West Herts erupted into a massive celebration.

As we walked down Vicarage Road, I was a little surprised to encounter touts.  I have come to expect that when the top six clubs are in town, but touts for Watford vs Brighton is a new one on me.  As I came through the turnstiles, “September” was playing over the tannoy, clearly getting us ready for Doucoure’s chant.

Chalobah on the run

Team news was that Silva had made just the one change from the Bournemouth game with Kabasele in for the suspended Holebas, so the starting line-up was Gomes; Femenía, Prödl, Kabasele, Britos; Chalobah, Doucouré; Amrabat, Cleverley, Richarlison; Gray.  Our old friend, Anthony Knockaert, started for the visitors, his name was announced to a loud chorus of boos.  Also of note was the fact that Silva was back in a suit, having donned a tracksuit for the Bristol City game in midweek.

There was an early chance for the Hornets as Amrabat played a through ball to Gray, but his shot was well wide of the target.  Our first chance to boo the pantomime villain came as Cleverley lined up to take a free kick and Knockaert took his place in a one man wall in front of the Rookery.  The wall was ineffective and the delivery was met by Chalobah whose header was blocked.  Amrabat beat a defender on the right before delivering a cross into the box, Richarlison and Gray both went for the ball but neither was able to make contact.  The first decent goal attempt came from the visitors after quarter of an hour with a curling shot from Knockaert which rebounded off the inside of the far post.  The first booking went to Brighton’s Bruno who was cautioned after clattering Richarlison.

Gerry Armstrong

The Brighton fans were yelling for a penalty after the ball appeared to hit Prödl, but it was clearly ball to arm and a corner was given.  The game changed on a moment of madness.  Knockaert was advancing down the wing and Britos just flew into a tackle with both feet off the ground.  It was a straight red card, with no complaints from any of us.  Thankfully Knockaert wasn’t injured.  The sending off prompted Silva to make a tactical substitution sacrificing Amrabat for Cathcart, which was a bit of a shame as Nordin was having his best game for a while.  The visitors had another chance to open the scoring as a corner from Groβ was headed wide by Dunk.  The post came to the Hornets’ rescue again as Hemed’s effort rebounded to safety.  At the other end, Chalobah tried a shot from distance that was just wide of the near post.  In time added on, Gomes was alert to punch a cross from Knockaert out for a corner, which came to nothing.

The half time player chat was with Gerry Armstrong.  As with all of the interviewee’s this season, he was asked about GT’s influence.  He credited the gaffer with getting him fit and allowing him to shine for Northern Ireland at the 1982 World Cup.   None of us who were around at the time will forget his goal scoring exploits at that tournament.  A Watford player at a World Cup was a new experience in 1982.

Carrillo makes his debut

Cathcart’s return from injury turned out to be short-lived, as he ran for a ball early in the second half and had to pull up.  He looked as though he wanted to continue but was convinced to seek treatment, after which he left the pitch to be replaced by new signing, Carrillo. At this point, Cleverley dropped into the right back position.  Brighton threatened with a dangerous cross towards Groβ in the Watford boss, but he was stopped by an excellent tackle from Femenía.  From a corner, the ball was headed back to Hemed who volleyed just wide of the target.  There was much discussion in the stands regarding the laws of the game when Knockaert went down in the box and, after a long consultation with the lino, the referee awarded an indirect free kick that was blasted off the wall.  Brighton threatened again as a cross was headed back across goal by Knockaert, on this occasion Prödl put it out for a corner.  A very promising break by Richarlison finished with a shot that was high and wide.  At the other end, a dangerous looking cross was saved by Gomes with Knockaert closing in.  Knockaert had yet another chance with 15 minutes to go, but his shot was saved by Gomes.  Brighton’s next attempt came from a corner, but Duffy headed just wide.  Richarlison lifted Watford hearts again after another break downfield, this time he fed Gray, but the outcome was the same with a shot that was well over the bar.

Prodl rises to meet the ball

With 10 minutes to go, Knockaert was replaced by Izquierdo, which was a relief as he had run us ragged.  Silva also made a late change, replacing Gray, who had worked very hard but never looked like scoring, with Deeney, a substitution that was very popular with the Watford crowd.  Both teams had a late chance to snatch the victory. The Brighton substitute, Izquierdo, tried a shot from distance that flew high and wide at the near post.  Then Watford’s new signing, Carrillo, had an opportunity to crown his debut when he met a cross from Femenía, but his header flew over the bar.  With the last kick of the game, Femenía sent a shot high and wide and the game finished goalless.

The post match consensus was that the ten men had put in a sterling performance to win a very well deserved point.  There was no sympathy for Britos whose tackle had been as reckless as it was unnecessary.  But there was much admiration for many of the others.  I don’t think he has been mentioned in the report at all, but Kabasele was absolutely immense.  He battled hard and consistently snuffed out attacks.  Femenía, who had replaced Britos on the left, had also done really well in the makeshift position.

Richarlison

The midfield players were excellent again.  Doucouré and Chalobah continue to impress.  Cleverley worked his socks off again and our first glimpse of Carrillo was a positive one.  Even Amrabat had his best game for a while, finding some end product to match the surging runs.  Then there was Richarlison, who has quickly become a favourite of mine.  What chances we created mostly came through him and he also gave a rather lovely interview to the programme, presumably through an interpreter.  It is clear that his attempts to settle in have been greatly helped by the presence of Gomes as well as a manager who speaks his language.  By all accounts, he is a lovely lad and his future looks very bright indeed.

The international break comes at a good time.  By the time we meet Southampton, we will know the final shape of our squad and hopefully will have some players back from injury.  We are unbeaten so far this season and there is a lot to like in this new squad.  If our next trip to the South coast is half as much fun as the last one, we have a lot to look forward to.

 

A Brilliant Brazilian beats Bournemouth

On Friday this week I took the day off work and spent the afternoon/evening at Glyndebourne for La Traviata, which was absolutely delightful.  As I was staying overnight in Brighton before the game on Saturday, I had to make sure that I packed my posh frock and high heels alongside my Watford shirt and that I didn’t pack anything that would cause problems at the security check at the turnstiles.

I left Brighton early on Saturday to take the train to Bournemouth via Southampton.  I had a naïve expectation of a picturesque journey along the South coast, but the view out of the window was sadly free of sea views instead dominated by housing estates.  On arrival into Bournemouth, I bumped into Richard and we made our way to the pre-match pub, which is one of our favourites.  As we settled down to enjoy our pints, we were puzzled to see a number of St Albans City fans in the pub until they explained that they were playing Poole Town and there were no decent pubs in that area.

Man of the match Richarlison

Due to the time it took us to get through the security line at the stadium last season, we left in good time, just as Mike arrived, having taken 4 hours to drive from South London.  When we arrived at the ground, the line was long and I did wonder how I would get through with the luggage from my overnight stay.  My first offering for inspection was a tote bag that contained my opera handbag.  This caused confusion and required a number of labels to be attached before it was considered safe.  Then I presented my rucksack which I opened up to reveal toiletries.  There was a look of horror. “Do you have any cans?  Any sprays.” “No.”  That was the search over, so she didn’t get to admire my posh frock and kitten heels.

Team news was that Silva had made four changes with Femenía, Prödl and Richarlison replacing the injured trio of Janmaat, Kaboul and Pereyra.  Gray was preferred to Okaka up front, which seemed a bit harsh after his tremendous performance against Liverpool.  So the starting line-up was Gomes; Femenía, Prödl, Britos, Holebas; Doucouré, Chalobah; Amrabat, Cleverley, Richarlison; Gray.

Richarlison, Holebas and Britos waiting for the ball to drop

For a few seasons now, the travelling fans at Bournemouth have been uncharacteristically unpleasant and there was an early attempt to enforce that reputation as a bloke along the row from me started screaming at the female lino to get back in the kitchen.  She was the other end of the pitch from us so wouldn’t have heard anyway, but it wound me up.  I’m afraid that my response to this abuse was neither reasoned nor nuanced, but it was to the point.  On the pitch the first chance fell to the visitors as Cleverley turned and shot but it was blocked.   Bournemouth had an excellent chance to open the scoring as King advanced and found Fraser in the box, his shot was parried by Gomes, the ball fell to Afobe, but Britos was on hand to block the shot and send it over the bar.  It went quiet for a while after that, until Amrabat crossed for Chalobah who directed his header just wide of the near post.  The first booking was earned by Britos for a rather desperate tackle on Arter.  On the half hour, Afobe latched on to a long ball from Cook and advanced to shoot but Gomes pushed the ball to safety.  At the other end Gray cut the ball back to Chalobah who turned to shoot, but the strike was weak and easily gathered by Begović.  Richarlison impressed with a lovely move to beat a defender before cutting back to Doucouré whose shot was deflected over.  Holebas swung the corner in and Richarlison met it but nodded over the bar.  Bournemouth’s reputation for diving wasn’t done any favours as Afobe collapsed in the box with his hands to his face and no Watford player anywhere near.  Play continued.  Watford had a great chance to take the lead at the end of the half as a cross-field ball from Cleverley found its way to Richarlison, he beat a defender on the byline before playing the ball back to Gray who blazed over when he should have done better.

Richarlison at the bottom of a pile of celebrating players

So we reached half time goalless after an end to end half which, judging by the reactions of my friends, I judged rather harshly as it wasn’t as good as the first half against Liverpool.  The Watford fans were very loud throughout the half, although the repertoire was dominated by a chant that was new to me “Oo-oo-oo Abdoulaye Doucouré <repeat> never gives the ball away” to the tune of Earth Wind and Fire’s “September”.  It is very catchy indeed.

The home side started the second half brightly as Cook met a corner from Ibe with a header that was on target, but Gomes was down to save.  At the other end, a Holebas cross was headed on by a Bournemouth player to Amrabat whose shot was terrible, flying across the box and out for a throw.  There was a baffling moment as Amrabat pulled the ball back to Chalobah who, while in a great position to shoot, opted to leave it for the man behind him, Harry Arter.  Television pictures showed that the Bournemouth man had called for the ball.  All the Watford fans who have been complaining on social media about this unsportsmanlike behaviour have clearly forgotten how funny it was when the loathsome Dai Thomas did the same thing at Kenilworth Road.  Chalobah had a golden chance to put his team in the lead soon after as he robbed a player in midfield and found himself one on one with Begović, but he had too long think about the shot and his strike was blocked by the keeper.  He had a second bite as the ball found its way back to him, but this time he curled the shot just wide of the target.

Andre Gray

The referee was in action then, booking Grey for dissent after he was fouled by Cook.  There was time for Pugh and Defoe to come on in place of Afobe and Ibe before the Bournemouth man was finally booked for the foul.  There was a lovely move for the Hornets as Cleverley and Amrabat exchanged passes on the overlap before crossing for Richarlison on the other flank, he played the ball back to Chalobah who blasted his shot over the bar.  The youngster’s day went from bad to worse as he was then booked for a foul on King.  Watford were severely testing the Bournemouth defence and came close from a Cleverley corner which Richarlison met with a shot that was blocked on the line.  The Brazilian was a constant threat and had two decent chances after receiving a long ball from Holebas, his first shot was blocked, the second saved.  But he wasn’t to be denied and the GT chant had to be delayed as Gray crossed and Richarlison slid in to attempt to make contact. as he was on the ground with a defender and Begović in close proximity, it seemed that the chance had gone, but he stuck out his foot and prodded the ball past the prone keeper to give Watford a well deserved lead.  The celebrations were passionate and a large number of fans decided to pile down to the front to celebrate at pitch side.  The problem with that is that the disabled fans are located in the first row and, in the ensuing melee, were either trampled or found themselves no longer able to see the pitch due to the fans who remained standing in front of them.  As in previous years, it got ugly at this point with fans arguing among themselves and with stewards, and the police got involved.  It was all so unnecessary.

Celebrating Capoue’s goal

Back to the action on the pitch and Richarlison had a chance to increase the lead as he met a cross from Holebas with a header that flew just over the bar.  The visitors created another opportunity as Amrabat played the ball over the top for Gray but, as on so many other occasions this afternoon, Aké was on hand to stop the attack.  Silva made his first substitution with 10 minutes to go, as Capoue replaced the goal scorer, who had been suffering from cramp.  Richarlison was given a well-deserved ovation as he left the field.  The home side had a chance to draw level as Defoe flicked the ball on to King who headed just over the bar, much to the relief of the travelling Hornets.  Silva made a second change, bringing Kabasele on for Amrabat, whose place on the wing was taken by Femenía.  Watford made the points safe with four minutes to go, a shot from Gray was saved, but the clearance was only as far as Capoue, who chested it down before hitting a powerful shot past Begović.  One of those belters that causes an explosion of a celebration in the crowd.  Watford had one final chance to increase their lead as Holebas tried a shot from outside the area, but Begović was equal to it.  Silva made one last change, bringing Watson on for Chalobah for the six minutes of stoppage time, but there was no further goal action and, after the misfortune of recent visits to Boscombe, it was great to see the Hornets leave with a deserved win.

The players came over to celebrate with the travelling fans, who were loud and proud, as they had been for most of the game, and shirts were tossed into the crowd.  There was a lovely moment as the players were heading towards the tunnel.  Chalobah was one of the last to leave the field.  He had a very frustrating afternoon and was trudging away when the away end burst into a rousing chorus of “Chalobah, my lord.”  The youngster turned to face the fans with a beaming smile on his face.  It was good to know that we sent him home happy (and that was before he met Alice!).

It took a while for the away crowd to vacate the stand, the stewards were pleading with us to leave so that they could go home.  We headed back to the pub where we were joined by the victorious St Albans fans celebrating their position at the top of the National League South after a 100% start to their season.  We congratulated them and then returned to the reflections on our deserved win and impressive performance.  It had been another entertaining game.  Richarlison’s first start had built on his impressive debut as substitute the previous week.  He was certainly the man of the match.  The goal was typical of his hard work for the whole game, during which he never gave up.  At times last season the players appeared only to want to score perfect goals so to see a young Brazilian happy to score the scrappiest of strikes was a lovely contrast.  Andre Gray had an assist for the goal and had worked really hard, but was up against Aké who was tremendous and gave him very little space.  But the most pleasing aspect was the teamwork.  This looks like a group of lads who are playing for each other and their manager.  After the misery of the end of last season, that is just wonderful to see and bodes well for a terrific season.  The future certainly looks golden.