Tag Archives: Ki Sung-Yueng

Wasteful Finishing Leads to a Loss on the Tyne

The view of the Tyne Bridge and the Sage, Gateshead from the back of the stand at St James Park

As has become our custom when playing in the North-East, we arranged to meet in Durham on Friday evening.  This plan appeared to be threatened when I received an invitation to travel to New York for a work event on Thursday morning.  But, despite a hiccup due to a slight delay on my return flight, my travel planning turned out to be spot on.  I arrived at Heathrow soon after 9:30am on Friday giving me time to get home for a shower and change of clothes before arriving at Kings Cross in plenty of time for my train at 1:30pm.

The Friday evening meal and drinks were lovely, although the wine flowed a little too freely, for which I have nobody to blame but myself.  The walk from the city centre to the railway station in Durham is up a series of flights of steps.  I saw it as training for the climb to the away stand in St James’s Park later in the day.  On arrival in Newcastle, we had a lovely breakfast followed by a walk along the Tyne which was enlivened by a troupe of teenage girl acrobats, wearing even less than your average Geordie, putting on a display that included some precariously standing on their friends’ shoulders and appearing in distinct danger of being blown into the river.  As if that wasn’t enough, there was a bonkers busker who decided to serenade the couples out for a ‘romantic’ walk with a rendition of Minnie Ripperton’s “Lovin’ You” which was unexpected and impressive as he (sort of) hit the high notes.

My view of the minute’s silence

We were outside the door of our chosen pre-match establishment before they opened and managed to secure a secluded area for our party.  As we enjoyed our refreshments, we were visited by a Newcastle fan dropping off flyers detailing the upcoming protests against Mike Ashley.  Today’s was an 11th minute brandishing of the leaflet reading “Get out of our Club” and a protest outside the lounge at the end of the game.  I was also delighted to be joined by my sister and brother-in-law who had come up on the supporters coach which had arrived in Newcastle uncharacteristically early.

We left in plenty of time to take the stroll uphill to the ground, before scaling the 14 flights to the stand.  On arrival, we were less than delighted to discover that our seats were almost at the back requiring us to negotiate another steep flight of steps and ensuring that I had worked off my breakfast prior to kick-off.

Team news was that Gracia had made the one change with Holebas returning in place of Masina.  So the starting line-up was Foster; Holebas, Cathcart, Mariappa, Femenía; Pereyra, Doucouré, Capoue, Hughes; Success, Deulofeu.

The minute’s silence at pitch level

Prior to kick-off there was a minute’s silence for Vichai Srivaddhanaprabha, the Leicester owner, and the others who lost their lives in the helicopter crash last weekend.  The silence spontaneously erupted into applause, which seemed appropriate for a man who had given so much to his community.  The contrast with the feelings of the locals for the Newcastle owner was not lost on me.

The first attack of note was made by the home side with a cross that was met by a wayward header from Mariappa that went out for a corner, the delivery of which by Shelvey was cleared by Hughes.  At the other end Capoue broke and fed Pereyra who was tackled, the ball fell to Deulofeu whose shot was deflected for a corner.  Former Watford loanee, Kenedy, was the next to try his luck with a shot from distance that was well wide of the target.  Then, as Muto broke forward, a shout of “handball” went up from the travelling Hornets, who took full credit when the referee blew up even though we knew that he couldn’t possibly have heard us.

Holebas lining up a corner with Pereyra in attendance

Pereyra and Holebas then combined brilliantly to get the ball to Hughes in the box, but the ball stuck under his feet and a tackle came in before he could shoot.  Watford should have taken the lead after 15 minutes when Mariappa met a Holebas corner with a header that was blocked on the line, the rebound fell to Hughes whose shot was also blocked, Mariappa had a second chance to score but shot just wide of the near post.  Newcastle were still causing the Hornets problems and a terrific shot from Diamé needed a good save from Foster to keep it out.  A lovely Watford move deserved more as Success found Deulofeu who broke into the box but was tackled before he could shoot.  This was followed by another gorgeous passage of play from the Hornets as Pereyra played the ball out to Holebas who put in a low cross for Deulofeu, but the Spaniard snatched at his shot and the ball flew wide of the near post.   At the other end, a misplaced pass allowed Kenedy to break, but he was stopped by a brilliant saving tackle by Mariappa.  Watford had another great chance to open the scoring as Success broke forward and passed to Deulofeu who was in an acre of space and should have done better with only the keeper to beat, but his shot was wide of the far post.

Breaking at a corner

A decent break from the home side was stopped by some clever defending from Holebas who managed to get in front of the Newcastle man and draw a foul.  Holebas was the centre of attention again soon after as he changed his shorts on the sideline.  Unfortunately my camera was in my pocket at the time.  Watford then won a free kick in a dangerous position, but the delivery from Capoue flew just over the bar.  The Frenchman was then booked for a tackle from behind on Muto.  Shelvey took the free kick, which was in an equally dangerous position, but his effort was well over the bar.  Deulofeu threatened again as he broke down the left, but his shot hit the side netting.  Watford had yet another decent chance as Pereyra played Success in, but the shot was blocked.  There was a final chance for the Hornets to take the lead before the break when Deulofeu slid the ball through to Success, but Dubravka was equal to the shot.  Despite Watford’s numerous chances during the half, that was the first save that the Newcastle keeper had had to make.  In the minute added on at the end of the half, Benitez made a substitution bringing Pérez on for Muto, who had taken a knock.  A decision that provoked a furious rant from Pete about the sheer pointlessness of the move when he could have had 20 minutes to recover.  Needless to say, the half time whistle went with the substitute not having had a touch and the game goalless.  It had been a frustrating half for the travelling Hornets.  Watford had much the better of the play and had created plenty of chances, Deulofeu could have had a hat trick on his own, but the finishing had been wasteful.

Pereyra, Holebas and Capoue gather for a free kick

The home side made another injury-enforced change at the break with Lascelles making way for Schär.  Watford had a superb chance to take the lead early in the second half when Success fought his way past Yedlin before passing to Pereyra whose shot looked all the way in until the crossbar got in the way.  Benitez was forced to make his final substitution only five minutes into the half when Shelvey was replaced by Ki, again due to an injury. Watford had another chance to take the lead from a corner, but Cathcart’s header was just over the bar.  Newcastle threatened as Rondón ran on to a through ball, Foster made a brave save, although he needn’t have bothered as the flag had gone up for offside anyway.  Foster came to the rescue again, punching a Ritchie corner clear, the ball came back in from Ki, but Foster gathered.  Hughes was then booked for a foul on Ki, conceding a free kick in a dangerous position.  Ki delivered the free-kick himself and it was headed home by Pérez to give the home side an unexpected lead.  Gracia made an immediate change bringing Gray on for Deulofeu.

Holebas delivers a corner

From the restart Newcastle broke forward, but Foster came out to make the tackle and avert the danger.  The home side had a great chance for a second goal soon after as a Kenedy cross was met by a header from Rondón that flew just wide of the target.  At the other end, a ball was launched for Success to run on to, but he let it run out of play much to the frustration of the travelling Hornets.  Kenedy did well to beat Mariappa and cross for Rondón, but Cathcart was on hand to make a saving header.  Success then did really well to break forward and cross for Gray who was stopped by a tackle from Kenedy.  Watford’s second substitution saw Hughes make way for Okaka.  Watford’s attempts to draw level continued as Pereyra crossed for Gray, but Dubravka was able to gather the ball.  A lovely passing move by the Hornets finished with a poor cross and the chance was lost.  Gracia made his final substitution replacing Success with Chalobah. I was shocked to hear cheers greeting this change.  I tried to be charitable and reason that the cheers must have been for the return of Chalobah, but it was so clear that they weren’t.  Now I am not Isaac’s biggest fan, he frustrates me greatly with some of his decision making.  A bit more thought allied with his skill and he would be a world beater.  He was also getting knocked off the ball a little too easily.  But he had worked hard and created some brilliant chances and certainly did not deserve that treatment from his own fans.  Watford had a late chance as Doucouré fired across the goal, but there was nobody on hand to turn the ball in.

Gathering for a Watford corner

There had been some theatrical feigning of injury by the Newcastle players (interspersed with bouts of cramp) which culminated in Yedlin going down dramatically after a collision with Pereyra.  The Newcastle man was claiming that his opponent had stamped on him.  As the Argentine protested, Holebas got involved and it all kicked off on the sideline with Holebas and Schär both being shown a yellow card after the handbags had been put down.  The Hornets had one last chance to snatch a point and it was a decent one as Doucouré played the ball back to Okaka who should have scored, but fired over the bar instead and Newcastle gained their first win of the season.

There were a lot of angry Watford fans after the game.  There was some justification for this as Newcastle had been very poor and were there for the taking.  But the first half performance had been impressive and the Hornets should have been 3 or 4 up at half time.  If the Pereyra shot that hit the crossbar early in the second half had gone in, we would have won the game.  But Newcastle worked hard, managed to get a goal from a set piece and it seemed to be game over from that point.  Still it is very dispiriting to hear so much anger directed at the players who have entertained us wonderfully so far this season.  We are half way to safety with less than 30% of the games played, so are already on the way to having a great season.  There will be the odd blip, but that shouldn’t derail the support as we are all in this together.  It would be great if some of our more volatile supporters could remember that.

Forty Points Achieved against the Swans

The legends flag greets the players

Due to the lack of an Easter programme in the Premier League, we only had one game this weekend, so I felt oddly cheated but determined to make the most of the one that we had.  The sun was shining when I reached the West Herts and joined the usual suspects at ‘our’ table.  Mike and Toddy were slumming with us before taking their place in the posh seats as a result of winning the Supporters Trust draw.  The rest of us enjoyed our more modest surroundings as much as we always do.

Discussion pre-match was about whether the next two games were must wins.  I must admit that, looking at the table with only 7 games to go, Watford’s 37 points and 10th place was starting to convince me that safety had already been achieved and so maybe we wouldn’t need any further points.  But it would be very reassuring to reach the holy grail of 40 points and this game had to be our best chance to do so.

Challenging for a ball into the box

The visit of Swansea also meant a return to Vicarage Road for legend and all round good egg Nigel Gibbs, who is on their coaching staff.  So it was a nice touch when Tim Coombs prefaced his reading of the away team with a welcome back for Gibbsy and the crowd gave him a very warm welcome indeed.

Team news was that Deeney was restored to the starting line-up alongside Prödl and Capoue replacing Okaka, Cathcart and Success.  So the starting line-up was Gomes; Janmaat, Prödl, Mariappa, Holebas; Cleverley, Doucouré, Capoue; Amrabat, Deeney and Niang.

The first goalmouth action of the game was a cross from Amrabat that was headed clear by Mawson.  The first actual goal attempt fell to the visitors as Sigurdsson broke into the box, his first shot was blocked, his second required a decent save from Gomes at the near post.  Swansea fashioned another dangerous chance as Sigurdsson launched a free kick into the box, the punch from Gomes flew into the air and fell for Fernández whose header, thankfully, landed on the roof of the net.  Watford’s first attempt on target came as Niang went on a run and tried a low shot from distance, but it was easy for Fabianski in the Swansea goal.

Celebrating Capoue’s goal

A lovely passing move from the Hornets finished with Amrabat shooting wide of the far post.  The Hornets had a great chance to open the scoring as Capoue played a lovely through ball towards Deeney in the box, but Fabianski was first to the ball.  There was good work from Doucouré to nick the ball before releasing Niang who was fouled on the edge of the area.  The Frenchman took the set piece himself, shooting through the wall but Fabianski dropped to make the save.  Then Janmaat won the ball and went on a tremendous run before crossing for Deeney whose shot was tipped over by Fabianski.  Despite the dominance of the Hornets, the visitors should have taken the lead on the half hour as Narsingh found Ki Sung-Yueng who only had Gomes to beat from close range, but he hesitated and then, as a defender appeared, shot straight at Gomes.  Sigurdsson was the next to try his luck, but his shot from distance was easy for Gomes.  Just when it looked as though the game would reach half time goalless, Capoue nicked the ball from Mawson and broke into the box, his first shot was blocked, but he buried the rebound to send the Rookery and particularly my niece, his biggest fan, into raptures.

Capoue and Cleverley line up a free kick

So the Hornets were leading at the break.  They had dominated possession without threatening Fabianski’s goal on too many occasions.  Swansea had a few decent chances, but they were clearly bereft of confidence and looked very unlikely to get back into the game.

The half time draw was made by Kenny Jackett.  As always it was lovely to see him back at Vicarage Road and he said all the right things when asked what he wanted from the meeting of two of his former clubs.

As the players came out for the start of the second half, instead of taking his place in goal in front of the Rookery, Fabianski remained on the half-way line.  I thought we were in for a very unusual kick-off but it turned out that he was just waiting for the referee to reappear with the matchball, so that he could have a cuddle of the ball before continuing.

Doucoure and Amrabat chase the ball

There was an early second half chance for the visitors as Sigurdsson tried a shot from just outside the area that flew wide.  At the other end Doucouré had a sight of goal so hit a shot from distance that flew over the bar.  Then Janmaat went on a great run into the box and unleashed a powerful shot that Fabianski did very well to divert from its intended path to the top corner.  Watford’s first substitution came just after the hour mark when Amrabat, who was waiting to take a throw-in on the opposite side from the dugouts, was replaced by Kabasele.  Nordin looked furious as he walked the width of the pitch and the message from Mazzarri was that his aim was to preserve the lead, a tactic that hasn’t always worked for us.

The 72nd minute was greeted with the customary chant of “One Graham Taylor” and the picture on the big screen showed Rita with her granddaughter in the Directors’ box.  So lovely to see her at Vicarage Road and I hope that the continued expressions of love for Graham bring her some comfort.

Gomes with a goal kick

Mazzarri’s second substitution saw Okaka replacing Niang.  The Italian looked to have sealed the game for the Hornets soon after when he received a lovely cross from Janmaat, controlled the ball on his chest and volleyed past Fabianski.  Sadly the goal was ruled out for offside.  Okaka turned provider soon after, crossing for Capoue whose shot cleared the bar.  There was danger for the home side as Sigurdsson swung a free kick towards goal, but Gomes was able to punch clear.  Then Ayew broke forward and crossed for Carroll whose shot found the side netting.  Mazzarri’s final change was to bring Behrami on in place of Cleverley.  Watford had one last chance to ensure the win as Doucouré tried a shot from outside the area, but Fabianski was equal to it.  The visitors had two chances to retrieve a point in time added on.  First a mistake from Prödl allowed them to advance, Borja crossed for Sigurdsson whose header was poor and flew wide of the near post.  The Icelander had one last chance, going on a dangerous run that was stopped by a crucial tackle from Doucouré.  So the final whistle went on the third home win in a row with the Hornets sitting pretty in 10th place having amassed 40 points.

The second half had been a poor spectacle and, with only the one goal lead, they seemed to make heavy weather of the game, but the three points has all but guaranteed that Watford will be a Premier League club for the third season in a row so the crowds leaving Vicarage Road did so with a spring in their step and those of us who had secured our season tickets for next season were feeling very happy indeed.

Home from Wales with a Decent Point

Troy returns up the pitch

Troy returns up the pitch

Swansea away is one of very few games for which I don’t need to travel through London, but it was still an early start to get to Reading to pick up the train.  As I boarded, I spotted a couple of our regular away travelers, so was treated to some unexpected but very welcome company for the trip to Wales.  As we left Reading, the sun was in my eyes but the fog soon descended and, added to the fact that it had been bitterly cold on Reading station, it looked like we were to be in for a very unpleasant day weather-wise.  Due to engineering work on the railways there were no trains running to Swansea, so we were turfed off the train at Port Talbot.  While the term ‘rail replacement’ is usually met with dread, the arrangements on this occasion went rather well with a bus waiting for us that ran straight to Swansea meaning that we arrived 20 minutes ahead of schedule.  Even better, the weather had improved considerably and we arrived to bright sunshine.

I parted company with my travelling companions on Wind Street to make my way to my party’s chosen pre match venue.  On arrival I was delighted to discover that it was an old-fashioned pub populated with locals which served decent beer and properly home cooked food and, bizarrely, had the cricket on teletext on the TV in the bar.  After a very pleasant lunch, we set off along the Tawe for a lovely walk to the stadium.

Gomes and Prodl

Gomes and Prodl

Team news was that Mazzarri had made two changes with Zúñiga and Ighalo in for Amrabat and the injured Success.  So the starting line-up was Gomes; Kaboul, Prödl, Britos; Zúñiga, Pereyra, Behrami, Capoue, Holebas; Deeney and Ighalo.  It was Bob Bradley’s first home game in charge at Swansea, so there were concerns that we may fall victim to the boost that a new manager often gives a team.  He was certainly making his mark with five changes from the Arsenal game.

Before kick-off, there was a minute’s silence to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Aberfan disaster.  I was very young indeed when it happened, but it still made a strong impression on me and, as an adult, the thought of a town losing a whole generation of children is beyond heartbreaking.  The silence was observed impeccably and it was good to see both teams wearing black armbands.

Britos lines up a free kick

Britos lines up a free kick

The first half was pretty dull.  The home side had the first chance with a shot from Barrow that, from our viewpoint, appeared to have flown wide, but the referee believed that Gomes had made a save, so awarded a corner.  The next chance of note came on 22 minutes as a terrible ball from Behrami allowed the home side to gain possession and Sigurdsson unleashed a shot that was stopped by a flying save from Gomes.  Watford’s first shot came just before the half hour when Capoue won a free kick, which he took himself just clearing the bar.  Capoue also had the next shot with an off-balance volley that was nearer to the target than it had any right to be.  Late in the half, a terrible clearance by Fabianski hit Deeney, but Troy was taken by surprise and wasn’t able to take advantage.  Just before half time, Capoue played a short free-kick to Kaboul who hit a shot that rebounded off the wall.  The first card of the game went to Capoue for a foul on Routledge which consisted of him lifting the player off the ground.  The offence was almost as hilarious as Capoue’s outrage at being penalized.  So we reached half time goalless.  Swansea had started the half the better team, but the Hornets certainly had the upper hand later in the half, although they didn’t test Fabianski in the Swansea goal.

Capoue beats the Swansea wall

Capoue beats the Swansea wall

At half time, I noticed that the banner display around the pitch was showing positive facts about Swansea in head to head matches against Watford.  The one that particularly caught my eye was that the last time they had failed to score in a home game against Watford was in March 1923.

Early in the second half Sigurdsson was shown a card for pulling Pereyra back.  Ten minutes into the half Capoue played for a free kick, as he appealed in vain, Swansea went on a break which finished with an acrobatic kick from Borja that flew wide of the target.  Deeney and Ighalo combined to find Capoue in space, but the Frenchman hesitated as he looked to the lino for an offside flag and the chance was lost.  Just before the hour, Ighalo went on a run into the box and executed a trademark Iggy Scoop but, instead of shooting, tried a second scoop and his shot was blocked, the ball dropped to Pereyra in the middle of the box but he got it caught under his feet and couldn’t get a shot off.  Mazzarri made the first substitution of the game bringing Amrabat on for Zúñiga.  This was a brave move in an away game as he was sacrificing defence for a more attacking player.

Kaboul readies to take a throw

Kaboul readies to take a throw

On 64 minutes there were cheers from the home fans as they thought that van der Hoorn had turned a Sigurdsson free kick home, but a terrific save from Gomes kept the score goalless.  Bradley’s first change saw Llorente come on for Routledge.  Holebas gave away a needless corner which led to a scramble in the Watford box, but the clearance allowed Amrabat to break before he was stopped by a pull from Britton who was booked for the foul.  Amrabat went on another break before playing the ball to Ighalo, there were appeals for a penalty as Naughton appeared to handle the ball, but nothing was given.  At the other end, Swansea threatened and Gomes had to drop to save a snap shot from Sigurdsson.  Watford had a second appeal for a penalty soon after as Behrami appeared to be tripped in the area but, again, the referee wasn’t interested.  Mazzarri’s second substitution was to replace Capoue with Guedioura.  Kingsley should have done better for the Swans when the ball found him in space in the box, but he swung his foot at the ball and missed.  Not for the first time that afternoon the claims for this division being the “Best League in the World” looked ridiculous.

Chasing a ball in the air

Chasing a ball in the air

The hosts should have taken the lead as a promising break finished with a shot from Sigurdsson that rebounded off the post with Gomes beaten.  There was frustration for the Hornets as a cross from Amrabat was chested down by Ighalo in the box and the whistle went for hand ball from a referee who had a considerably worse view than we did.  Watford had a terrific chance for a late winner as Ighalo played in Amrabat whose shot was just over the bar.  On the stroke of 90 minutes Naughton tried a weak shot that was straight at Gomes.  In time added on, Guedioura hit a cracking shot but it was straight at Fabianski who made an easy save.  So the game finished goalless and Swansea failed to score against Watford at home for the first time since 1923 (talk about tempting fate!).

All in all, it had been a lively match which was sadly devoid of goal chances.  Swansea’s Barrow was the pick of the players, a constant menace on the wing but there was no outlet for him.  For the Hornets, I thought that Holebas was the pick of the outfield players, and Gomes has to be credited with preserving the point.  Whatever Swansea’s current position in the table, a point there is a decent result and is an improvement on our performance and result last season (I distinctly remember leaving the ground and meeting someone who told me we’d definitely be relegated now).

I am happy to report that the return journey went without a hitch and, again, I was fortunate to bump into some lovely Watford people who considerably enhanced my trip home.

A Very Blue Monday for the Hornets

The Liberty Stadium

The Liberty Stadium

After a run of three league defeats, the trip to Swansea seemed to be a decent opportunity to get our season back on track.  The journey west was rather pleasant and, having bumped into a fellow regular away traveler as I boarded the train to Swansea, I was treated to delightful company as we crossed the border.

Team news was that there were three changes from the Southampton game with Britos and Aké coming back in place of Prödl and Holebas, while Behrami was a surprising inclusion in place of Abdi.  Flores had opted for a 4-4-2 formation with Behrami in the centre of the midfield and Capoue on the right.  So the starting line-up was Gomes, Aké, Cathcart, Britos, Nyom, Jurado, Behrami, Watson, Capoue, Deeney and Ighalo.  Former loanee, Jack Cork, started for Swansea.  The game was given an interesting twist as the Swans confirmed the appointment of Francesco Guidolin, formerly Head Coach of Udinese, a role which he left to take up a position that was supposed to involve oversight all three Pozzo teams, although it was never clear how this impacted the Hornets.

Abseiling marines

Abseiling marines

On taking our seats in the Liberty Stadium, I have to say that I was very impressed with the Swansea support.  The ground was packed and they were noisy from the start.  I was not quite so impressed with the mortifying spectacle of ‘kiss-cam’ on the big screen before the game as they focused on random pairs of men and women and trained a camera on them until they kissed or the cameraman got bored.  In some cases there were empty seats between the ’couple’ so a kiss could have led to an ejection as the actual partner witnessed an infidelity.  There was no warning about ‘kiss-cam’ but there was a warning to the disabled seating area that the ropes hanging down from the top of the stand would soon be occupied by some marines abseiling down, one of whom would bring the match ball to the referee.  It wasn’t the most coordinated of manoeuvres, but that could be said of a lot that we have seen on the pitch of late.  The lack of coordination extended to my pre-match equipment check as I left my camera at the hotel, so the quality of my photos is even worse than usual.

The pre-match huddle

The pre-match huddle

The home side had much the better start to the game.  Although there was a very early chance for the visitors as Deeney headed the ball down to Ighalo whose shot was blocked.  From then it was all Swansea for a while.  First Sigurdsson played a back heel to Routledge, but Gomes saved, not knowing that the flag was already up for offside.   A cross from Ayew was headed clear by Cathcart.  Then Cork hit a shot from distance that flew over the bar.  Sigurdsson tried a through ball to Ki, who was also flagged offside.  A cross into the box from Routledge was headed for a corner by Britos.  Over a quarter of an hour had passed before Watford looked like creating another chance, this time Deeney released Ighalo, but Odion couldn’t control the ball and the chance was lost.  Swansea threatened again as Britton played a one-two with Ayew before breaking into the box, but Aké was in close attendance and ensured that Gomes could save at his feet.  At the other end, a free kick from Watson was cleared only as far as Deeney whose shot was blocked.  Deeney then did really well to battle past Taylor and cross for Ighalo but his header was off target.  The first booking of the game was picked up by Jurado for a silly tackle on Routledge.  Swansea threatened again as Ayew exchanged passes with Sigurdsson before unleashing a shot that Gomes was down to save.

Watson preparing for a free kick

Watson preparing for a free kick

On 27 minutes, the home side took the lead as Williams headed a cross from Ki past Gomes.  I was hoping for an immediate reaction from the Hornets, but the nearest we came was a booking for Nyom who was penalised for sticking out a foot to stop Taylor.  The resulting free kick was punched clear by Gomes.  Nyom didn’t redeem himself as a soft clearance went straight to Ki who, thankfully, shot well over the bar.  Hornet hearts beat a little faster as Ighalo picked up a misplaced pass from Ki and looked to be bearing down on goal, but Williams was soon back to make a tackle.  There were a couple of chances for an equalizer just before half time.  First a Watson free kick reached Deeney who hit a hopeful shot over the bar.  Then, Watford’s best chance of the half, as Jurado exchanged passes with Capoue before shooting but the Swans’ keeper, Fabianski, was behind the ball.

So we reached half time a goal behind.  It had been another frustrating half of football.  Our successful start to the season had been built upon being difficult to break down through hard work and constantly pressing the opposition.  That aspect of the game seems to have disappeared from recent performances although more due to a lack of confidence than desire.  We could only hope for an improvement in the second period, although Flores made no changes at the break.

Watson preparing for a free kick

Watson preparing for a free kick

The first chance of the second half fell to Jurado who cut in from the left and then hit a silly shot high and wide when a little more composure was needed.  The Spaniard also had the next chance, after a decent run he passed to Deeney who back-heeled the return but Jurado curled his shot over the bar.  Watford’s best chance of the game so far came as a free-kick from Watson was met by a header from Britos that landed on the roof of the net although, for a split second, many of the travelling Hornets thought that it was in.  Swansea’s first attack of the half came after Capoue lost the ball to Routledge who advanced and crossed, but Nyom was on hand to clear.  The visitors continued to attack as Deeney played the ball out to Jurado, but his cross was blocked.  At the other end, the ball fell to Cork on the edge of the box but he volleyed over the bar.  On the hour, a Watford attack was stopped when Britton put out a hand to block a pass from Behrami and was booked for his trouble.  The resulting free kick was dreadful from Watson flying high and wide of the goal.  Another chance went begging for the visitors as Ighalo played the ball back to Jurado whose shot was just wide of the far post.  Deeney threatened to break with Ighalo alongside him, but his pass was snuffed out by a defender.  Flores made his first substitution with 15 minutes remaining bringing Paredes on for Nyom, who had had a poor game.  Capoue played two decent crosses into the box in quick succession but, on each occasion, the Swansea captain, Williams, headed clear.  Ighalo then won a free kick in a dangerous position but Watson opted to hit the ball low and straight at the wall, much to the frustration of the away fans.

Hoping to convert a corner

Hoping to convert a corner

The Hornets continued to push for an equalizer as a downward header from Deeney was cleared for a corner.  At the same time Ighalo went down in the box under a challenge and there were some half-hearted shouts for a penalty, which would have been very harsh.  The corner was cleared to Jurado but Fabianski was equal to his shot.  Flores made his second substitution with 3 minutes remaining, replacing Behrami with Oularé.  The Belgian almost made an immediate impact as Deeney headed the ball towards him on the edge of the box, but he couldn’t quite connect and it fell to Jurado who shot just wide.  Soon after, a corner from Watson was punched clear.  Despite Watford’s dominance of the second half, it appeared that the home side had increased their lead as substitute Gomis broke into the box and thumped a shot that looked to have beaten Gomes before it rebounded off the inside of the post and was cleared.  The last chance of the game fell to the visitors in time added on as the ball dropped to Deeney on the edge of the box but his shot was wide of the near post and the Hornets fell to their fourth consecutive defeat in the league.

Watson takes a free kick

Watson takes a free kick

There was a lot of frustration among the travelling fans at the end of the game and one young man went to the front of the stand to berate Deeney.  I then bumped into someone who told me that we are going to be relegated.  All rather dramatic and, on reflection, it certainly doesn’t feel as bad as that.  The Hornets had made a much better fist of the second half.  Jurado was coming in for a lot of stick from some near me for disappearing after his booking and, while he seemed reluctant to commit to a tackle, most of the shots on goal came from him and a couple were only fractionally wide.  Without his contribution, it would have been a far more miserable evening.  There has been a lot of talk of teams working out how to play against us, but a lot of what the opposition is doing now, they have been trying to do all season with little success.  The extra defenders on Deeney and Ighalo are stifling their contribution but Odion seems to have lost a bit of his previous confidence as he is not muscling his way out of trouble as he did earlier in the season and there were a couple of occasions when he passed to a teammate when you would have put money on him trying a shot.  What has been the biggest concern for me is that we have stopped harrying the opposition meaning that they have far too much space.  So I was pleased to see much more ‘gegenpressing’ in the second half which, consequently, meant we had more of the ball and more shots on the Swansea goal.

While the recent record is worrying, I am not going to get too despondent yet.  The players and manager have not become poor overnight so we need to continue supporting them.  Whatever happens at the end of this season, this will still have been the best season that we have seen at this level since the 80s.

Our First Home Win of the Season

The Lower GT prior to kick-off

The Lower GT prior to kick-off

In the run up to this game, having had two weeks to stew after the visit to City, we’d had lots of time to agonize about our lack of goals. At the Tales from the Vicarage event, Troy Deeney had been rather dismissive of his “goal drought” and said that they would come. However, having not had a shot on target in the last two games and having seen Deeney’s frustration, you couldn’t help but worry about the visit of Swansea who had had a decent start to the season and came into this game in 4th place and unbeaten.

Team news was just the one change with Anya in for Holebas. The starting XI was Gomes, Anya, Cathcart, Prödl, Nyom, Capoue, Behrami, Abdi, Ighalo, Jurado, Deeney. Former loanee jack Cork started for the visitors.

 

Kick-off

Kick-off

Watford’s first attack came after a spell of patient build-up play that was beginning to frustrate when the ball reached Anya and he went on a run before playing the ball out to Jurado whose cross was blocked. The first goal attempt came when a cross from Anya was headed clear but only as far as Prödl who blasted just over the bar. Then a cross from Nyom was deflected to Deeney on the edge of the box, but his shot was blocked. Abdi looked certain to score until his shot took a wicked deflection that sent it wide of the target. Jurado took the corner, but it was a poor effort that didn’t beat the first man. Troy stole the ball from a Swansea player’s feet before advancing and whipping in a cross that Fabianski gathered before it reached the head of Ighalo. Swansea’s first threat on the Watford goal came on 20 minutes as a shot from Gomis was met by a flying save from Gomes who pushed the ball clear of the goal before gathering it safely. Watford continued to threaten as a free kick from Prödl was headed out to Abdi who unleashed a volley that flew high and wide.

Abdi takes a free kick

Abdi takes a free kick

On 23 minutes, I was convinced that we would open the scoring as Deeney got the ball on the edge of the box and, from our vantage point behind the goal, the path to the bottom corner opened up, so there were heads in hands in the Rookery when the shot curled wide. Capoue played a lovely ball to Jurado in the box, but the Spaniard took one touch too many and was dispossessed. Swansea could have taken the lead as Anya was dispossessed by the corner flag, Ayew cut in and crossed for Gomis, who was tumbling so his shot from close range shot was easily caught by Gomes. At the other end, Ighalo battled into the Swansea box and, much to the frustration of the Rookery faithful and his captain, tried a shot from a narrow angle that was saved by the feet of Fabianski when a cut back to Deeney would have been a better option. Soon after, a cross from Anya was just missed by Deeney as he came flying at the ball. Watford put themselves in trouble just before half time as the ball was lost on the right and a cross reached Gomis whose shot drew a great save from Gomes who wasn’t to know that the offside flag was up.

So, again, we reached half time scoreless, but this had been a really positive performance from the Hornets who had the best of the chances. It was particularly pleasing to see Deeney playing an effective role in the hole behind Ighalo with the two front men linking up in a way that we haven’t seen in the past couple of games. During the interval, Jay DeMerit was interviewed on the pitch talking about his happy memories of his time at Watford. Lovely to see him again.

Cathcart leaping to meet the ball

Cathcart leaping to meet the ball

The second half started with a period of possession for the visitors, but they didn’t create any goal scoring opportunities, the first shot of the half falling to Abdi whose shot rolled towards goal where Fabianski saved easily at the near post. Then Deeney’s shot from a Nyom cross was blocked. Deeney was in action again as he held the ball up before feeding Ighalo whose shot was just wide of the post. Just before the hour mark, Gomes launched a ball upfield that Deeney headed on to Ighalo who shot past Fabianski to send those inside Vicarage Road wild. That goal had been coming, but it was a great relief to finally break the home duck. Spirits were dampened soon after as the Hornets were reduced to 10 men. There was some confusion in the Rookery as it appeared that Behrami had been fouled by Ayew and that the card was being brandished at the Swansea man, but it was the Watford man who left the field and pictures later showed a stamp by Behrami had caused his departure. It was a worrying development as Behrami had been excellent.

Deeney, Behrami and Cathcart awaiting a free kick

Deeney, Behrami and Cathcart awaiting a free kick

This could very well have been a turning point and it is great credit to the lads that it wasn’t. Flores’ immediate response to the sending off was to sacrifice Abdi for Watson. Thankfully Watford continued to attack as a cross from Anya was only cleared as far as Jurado whose shot was blocked, the ball found its way to Capoue whose shot across goal flew wide. Watford’s second substitution saw Berghuis replace Ighalo. The next action was in the Watford box as Éder came flying in to challenge Gomes and left the keeper in a heap on the ground. Thankfully, after a short period of treatment, he was able to continue. Shelvey attempted an exchange of passes with Montero but the return ball was cut out by Watson. Swansea’s next goal attempt was a shot from distance by Fernandez that landed in Row TT of the Rookery almost hitting a child whose Dad was on a final warning from his mother about keeping him out of danger. Capoue continued to impress as he broke into the box but his low shot was saved. There were shouts of ‘handball’ from the Rookery as Ki controlled the ball and passed to Fernandez whose shot was well over the bar.

Anya launches a throw

Anya launches a throw

Capoue was again on the attack as he pirouetted to shrug off the attentions of a defender and went on a run that deserved more than a blocked shot at the end of it. With 7 minutes remaining, Flores replaced Deeney with Diamanti leaving us with no strikers on the pitch and a clear mandate to defend the lead, which is always risky at 1-0. As the minutes ticked down, the nerves increased so it was a relief when a ball from Naughton to Shelvey was intercepted by Anya who took it out of the danger area. Swansea’s best chance of the game came in the last minute of normal time as a powerful shot from Shelvey was blocked by Gomes who spilled the ball before pouncing to gather as Éder closed in. The announcement that the fourth official had indicated seven minutes of injury time prompted an increase in both the heart rates of the Rookery faithful and the volume of the chants, which had already been quite impressive. Jurado broke forward and crossed for Berghuis who had two shots on goal, both of which were blocked by Fabianski. There was a bit of a frantic scramble in the Watford box, with the home defence unable to clear so it was a relief when Fernandez headed over the target to loud cheers from the Rookery. As the Hornets broke down the other end, there was a cry from behind me “We don’t need another goal, just keep it there,” which they duly did.

Gomes and Deeney applaud the crowd

Gomes and Deeney applaud the crowd

As injury time ticked on, Watford fans in all the stands were on their feet loudly encouraging their heroes and as the final whistle went there were rapturous cheers and the feeling that we had all played our part in that victory. My niece declared that it had been the longest 7 minutes of her life and, judging by the exhausted looks of those around us, that was a popular opinion. There was loud applause, singing and flags waving as the players made their way around the ground applauding the fans. Then, as we made a move to leave, “Gold” came blasting over the tannoy meaning one last rendition of “Ighalo-oh” before we went home. On the way out through the concourse there were groups standing around the televisions just waiting to see confirmation of our 12th place in the table which was greeted with cheers.

Outside the ground there was an unpleasant atmosphere as the Swansea fans were as niggly and aggressive as their team had been, but we were soon back to the West Herts and the smiles couldn’t have been wider as we reflected on the game. There had been a far more positive approach and the partnership of Deeney and Ighalo looked back to its best. The only player that drew any criticism was Jurado who is yet to convince, his set pieces were just awful. Still, it is churlish to criticise, as this was one of those games that reminds me why I go to football. A tremendous performance on the pitch and a wonderful supportive atmosphere in the stands. Bring on Newcastle.