Tag Archives: Joe Hart

Hooray for London Buses

Kabasele tracking Barnes

In my enthusiasm to buy train tickets for the first away game of the season, I completely forgot about Burnley’s involvement in the Europa League, so was booked on the 8:03 from King’s Cross via Leeds on Saturday morning.  When the game was moved to the Sunday, I looked at changing the ticket but found that the first train leaving London on Sunday would not arrive in time for me to make kick-off.  Just as I was contemplating a lonely Saturday night in Burnley, a dear friend offered to show me the sights of Bradford, so I was treated to a Hockney exhibition followed by curry, beer and putting the world to rights.  All rather lovely.

We made good time on the journey from Bradford to Burnley on Sunday morning and were in the Cricket Club by 11 and soon joined by a couple of VIPs from the club as well as the Happy Valley Horns and Kate and the two Janices who had caught the supporters’ coach at 6am.  The cricket club is a lovely friendly place and we were soon in conversation with a local who is clearly enjoying their European exploits.

On arrival at the turnstiles, the steward looked slightly aghast at my tightly packed overnight bag and the discovery of toiletries inside had her shaking her head, declaring them flammable and therefore not allowed inside the stadium.  Thankfully her supervisor decided that roll-on deodorant and lemon shower gel were not too dangerous in the hands of a middle-aged woman so I was allowed to keep them. I assured her that I wouldn’t put a match to them.

Holebas launches a throw to Pereyra

Team news was that Gracia had kept faith with the team who did so well last week, so the starting line-up was Foster; Holebas, Cathcart, Kabasele, Janmaat; Pereyra, Doucouré, Capoue, Hughes; Gray, Deeney.  Burnley featured former Watford loanee Jack Cork and, of course, had Sean Dyche and Ian Woan in the dugout.

As I was on a flight to the US last Saturday for work, I missed the Brighton game, so I was really looking forward to my season starting properly.  But, as Watford hadn’t scored away from home since January 2nd and we never get anything at Burnley, my expectations were pretty low prior to kick-off.  Thankfully they were confounded as the Hornets started brilliantly with a chance in the second minute as Deeney crossed for Gray, whose shot was blocked by Tarkowski.  The visitors took the lead a minute later as Deeney and Gray exchanged passes before the former Burnley man hit a superb volley that gave Hart no chance.  I am pleased to confirm that, despite the length of time that had elapsed since the last away goal, the travelling Hornets had not forgotten how to celebrate.  The home fans were not so happy and, as if in sympathy, the big screen in the opposite corner went blank.

Cathcart takes a free kick

Unfortunately, Watford’s lead was very short lived as Burnley won a corner and Tarkowski rose highest to head home for the equaliser.  The home side then had a period of dominance and had a great chance to take the lead as Gudmundsson curled a gorgeous free kick towards the Watford goal, but Foster pulled off a decent save to keep the scores level.  Gray should have done better after exchanging passes with Pereyra but his shot was mishit and flew wide.  At the other end a Cork shot was blocked and, in the ensuing goalmouth scramble some tenacious defending ensured that no Burnley player got a clear sight of goal before the ball was finally cleared.  The Hornets had a decent end to the half and could have regained the lead when Deeney tried a shot from distance, but Hart got a hand to it and kept it out.  The first caution of the game went to Hughes for a silly challenge on Ward that appeared to take place off the field when Watford had already won a throw-in.  The home side had one last chance to take the lead before half time as a cross-cum-shot from Hendrick was saved by Foster, it fell to Lennon, but Holebas made a terrific tackle to prevent the shot.  So we reached half time with honours even.  It has to be said that Burnley had slightly the better of the half, but it had been a good contest.

Celebrating Deeney’s goal

The second half started brilliantly for the Hornets as a blocked ball into the box rebounded to Doucouré, who played a gorgeous pass to Deeney, with only Hart to beat he made no mistake and the Hornets were ahead again.  It turns out that Watford away goals are like London buses, you don’t see one for over seven months and then three come along at once.  This time it was Hughes who intercepted a terrible ball from Lowton, advanced and found the bottom corner.  At this point, the travelling Hornets were beside themselves.  The first Burnley booking was born of frustration as Ward was cautioned for pulling Hughes down.  Watford had a decent chance to increase their lead as Capoue launched a long cross into the box, but it was just too far in front of Deeney. As the game reached the final quarter hour, both sides made substitutions as Barnes and Vokes came on for Wood and Hendrick for the home side and Sema replaced Gray for the visitors with Watford switching to just one up front.  Vokes almost made an instant impact as he met a Gudmundsson free kick with a header that flew just wide.  Each side made a further substitution as Taylor came on for Ward and Femenía replaced Will Hughes, who went off to a standing ovation.  With time running out, Sema had a great chance to grab a fourth goal for the Hornets, but his low shot was put out for a corner.  Watford’s final substitution came with a minute to go as Deeney made way for Success.  As the fourth official raised the board showing time added on, Vokes crossed for Mee but the shot was poor and missed the target.  There was a better-looking chance as a cross reached Barnes but the shot was met with a good catch from Foster and the flag was up for offside anyway.  There was another caution for the Hornets as Janmaat was booked for a late tackle that was totally unnecessary.  But the final whistle went on a very satisfying win for the Hornets.

The Royal Dyche

As we streamed out of the ground, there were beaming smiles among the Watford fans who couldn’t quite believe what they had seen.  Not just three goals away from home, but against a very decent Burnley side at Turf Moor.  The first half had been even but, once Watford took the lead in the second half, the home side never looked like they would get back in the game.  It was great to see both Gray and Deeney on the scoresheet, they are playing very effectively together and making chances for each other and others.  There was some lovely football played, with three excellent goals, but that sublime pass from Doucouré was the pick of the bunch.  I think most Watford fans consider him to be the signing of the Summer but, after missing all of the pre-season games, he could have been forgiven if he had taken a few games to get back to his best.  On Sunday he was running after everything and playing as if he had never had a break.  He wasn’t the only one, another pleasing contrast to last season is the fitness of the players.  Most games last season started at pace but fizzled out after about 70 minutes as the players tired.  On Sunday, they were working until the end and saw the game out effectively.  A lot of people were nervous at the start of the season, but this is looking like a very strong side and they are playing the sort of football that we knew they were capable of last season, but so rarely saw.

On the way back to the station, I was delighted to pass the Royal Dyche pub.  The sign is a thing of beauty and I wish Sean luck for the rest of the season, but am delighted that it was the Watford fans who were smiling on Sunday.

 

We are still Family

Meeting Watford legend Ann Swanson

Having experienced 3 defeats before the international break, I approached this game with some trepidation.  West Ham have struggled so far this season, but they have a good squad and there was concern that the appointment of David Moyes would provide the “new manager bounce” that so often occurs.  There was also the worry that the speculation regarding Silva’s future could have an adverse impact on the team and there were certain fans on social media speculating about the crowd giving the coach a hard time.  As so often, I despair at the mentality of certain football fans.

But, before the trip to Vicarage Road, there were serious things to deal with at the West Herts.  “The game” was being played.  A glorified game of snap during which the first few to match cards pick from an array of beautifully wrapped gifts placed on the table, once those are gone it is a dog-eat-dog scenario and there are various little factions who plot against each other.  At the end of each round, the “winners” get to open their prizes, which are usually utter rubbish (by design) although the theme of this game was “J” which led to an inordinate number of jaffa cakes being on offer and the shocking revelation that one of our number doesn’t like jaffa cakes.  I am still reeling from that news.  As always, absent friends were toasted as we played.  Dee and Toddy were always enthusiastic players.

When the game was done, Alice introduced me to Jeff, one of the Denver Horns, who told me that he reads this blog.  It is always lovely to meet fellow Hornets and hear about their matchday experiences.  Having travelled so far, we were hoping that he was in for an enjoyable afternoon.

Celebrating the goal from Hughes (he is in there somewhere)

It is the 25th anniversary of Watford’s Community and Education Trust and the club had chosen this game to celebrate.  As part of the commemorations, they had invited Ann Swanson back as guest of honour.  Ann had run the Junior Hornets back in the 80s and her efforts in ensuring that youngsters had a safe environment in which to watch football helped a whole generation of fans develop a love for the game, many of whom are now bringing the next generation along.  While I am too old to have been part of this group, I did want to shake her hand and thank her for all that she had done.  While waiting, it was lovely to hear her greet a guy with, “You’re one of my Junior Hornets.”  She seemed thrilled, but the warmth of the young man’s greeting showed the great esteem in which she is held by her former charges.

Team news was that Holebas and Carrillo were making way for Mariappa and Zeegelaar, who was making his debut.  So the starting line-up was Gomes, Mariappa, Kabasele, Britos; Femenía, Cleverley, Doucouré, Zeegelaar; Hughes, Richarlison; Gray.

The game had barely kicked off when there was a lengthy delay as Zeegelaar required treatment after making contact with Carroll’s elbow.  He was down for a considerable time, so it was looking like possibly the shortest debut in history but, thankfully, after treatment he was fit to continue (with added nose plugs).  Watford took the lead in the 11th minute, Zeegelaar’s cross led to some pinball in the box, before Hughes buried it.  It was a tremendous strike and I couldn’t have been happier for him.

Britos and Carroll

West Ham created a chance soon after as Carroll met a cross from Zabaleta, but Gomes was equal to the shot.  Just before the half hour, Carroll had survived a couple of tackles when Richarlison appeared and took the ball off him, and was hacked down for his trouble.  It was a petulant reaction and not his first infringement of the afternoon, so there was some annoyance among the Watford fans when he was only shown a yellow card.  That annoyance turned to anger soon after as Britos was booked for a late tackle on Kouyaté.  The fury was somewhat misplaced as Britos deserved the booking, but it did look a tad harsh in the light of Carroll’s infringements.  Watford had a chance to increase their lead as Hughes played the ball out to Gray, but his cross-cum-shot from a narrow angle was easily gathered by Hart.  There was a better chance soon after as a terrific shot from Richarlison was saved, the rebound reached Femenía who shot just wide of the far post.  The petulance from the West Ham players wasn’t confined to Carroll as Arnautovic also reacted to being tackled by Cleverley by hacking him down and was booked.  Back to the beautiful game, there followed a lovely series of passes from the Watford players with Olé ringing out around the ground until the ball reached Britos and it was “Oh dear” as he launched the ball into Row Z.  The next West Ham booking went to Obiang for a trip on Hughes.

Gomes was a hero in goal

West Ham really should have equalized with 3 minutes to go to half time, as Noble played a through ball to Kouyaté, who only had Gomes to beat but, with heads already dropping in the Rookery, the Watford keeper managed to turn the shot around the post.  From the corner Watford broke upfield and Femenía crossed for Hughes whose volley was over the bar.  West Ham had another great chance to draw level in time added on at the end of the half, but Gomes was magnificent, first reacting brilliantly to stop a header from Arnautovic, then instinctively blocking the follow-up and catching the third attempt.  Those of us standing behind the goal who witnessed the saves were just looking at each other in disbelief that he had kept the ball out of the net.  Watford had a final chance to increase their lead just before half time, but Richarlison’s shot was just wide of the far post.

It had been a thoroughly entertaining half of football and, while Watford were good value for their lead, there had been a couple of golden chances for the visitors towards the end and the crowd were singing the name of Gomes in adoration.

Half time saw Ann Swanson being introduced on the pitch.  She spoke warmly about her time at the club and particularly the relationships with both GT and Elton who were great advocates and supporters of the Junior Hornets.  She received a tremendous ovation, which was just lovely.

A blurred Richarlison still celebrating after scoring

Watford had a great chance to increase their lead early in the second half as Femenía crossed for Gray, but Reid got a foot in to stop the shot.  At the other end a cross from Arnautovic was turned over the bar by Kouyaté.  Watford threatened again as Hughes played the ball back to Doucouré who hit a cracking shot that was just wide of the target.  Hughes then tried a shot himself, but it took a slight deflection off a West Ham head and was easy for Hart.  Gray was the next to try his luck, but his shot was deflected for a corner.  Watford should have increased their lead as Mariappa met the delivery from Hughes with a header that Hart did well to keep out, it dropped to Richarlison who was almost on the goal line, I still have no idea how he didn’t turn it in but, somehow, the ball was cleared.  The young Brazilian made up for that mistake soon after as he went on a run before shooting across Hart and into the far corner.  His celebration showed how much it meant to him and was almost as passionate as that of my sister, who is married to a West Ham fan.  The goal certainly calmed some nerves in the home crowd and from that moment on, West Ham never looked like getting anything from the game.  The first change for the visitors came on 65 minutes with Sakho replacing Carroll who went off to boos from both ends of the ground and chants of “You’re not fit to wear the shirt” from his own fans.

Cleverley, Richarlison and Kabasele

A lovely passing move from the Hornets finished with a shot from Doucouré that was saved by Hart.  The Watford fans were in a good mood at this point and thoughts turned to the man in the dugout whose name was chanted followed by a chorus of “Marco Silva, we want you to stay.”  There was another long break in the game following a nasty injury to Arnautovic, who was clearly in a lot of pain clutching his arm.  Thankfully, the stretcher wasn’t required and the post-match news was that he had broken a thumb, but he had to be replaced by Masuaku.  West Ham had a great chance to pull one back with a low shot from Lanzini, but Kabasele was there to clear it off the line.  At this point the away end vented their frustration starting with chants against Brady and Sullivan (I assume that they had started with Gold, but I missed that one) followed by “You destroyed our  *** club.”  I couldn’t help but sympathise, the move to Stratford seems to have ripped the soul from the club.  Back on the pitch, Zeegelaar, who had had a great game, took the ball down brilliantly on the wing and put in a lovely low cross, but there was no Watford player in the box to connect.  West Ham’s captain was the next to see yellow as Noble was booked for a trip on Richarlison.  Silva waited until the last five minutes of normal time to make his first substitution, bringing Pereyra on for Hughes.  The guy who sits next to me commented, “One magician for another,” which perfectly summed up the terrific performance from Hughes.  As this change was being made, there was a signal to the bench that Femenía was unable to continue, so he was replaced by Holebas.  Due to the injuries in the second half, there was 8 minutes of added time, but the only scoring chance worthy of note fell to the Hornets as Richarlison curled a shot just wide of the far post.  There was just time for Carrillo, fresh from racking up a boat load of air miles travelling to Peru’s World Cup qualification games against New Zealand, to come on in place of Gray.  Attention at this point turned to the TV studio adjacent to the Rookery.  The sight of Ighalo having his make-up done before appearing for the post-match analysis prompted changes of “Oghalo-oh!”  As he looked out smiling, the whole of the Rookery waved at him.  He waved back.  All rather lovely.

Zeegelaar directing Doucoure

The final whistle went to jubilation in the stands.  Watford back to winning ways and in some style.  The coach and players were applauded off with special adulation directed at Gomes as he made his usual lap of the pitch.  We had to reign our happiness in a little as we were meeting my brother-in-law, my sister already having received a message from her Watford-fanatic daughter telling her to “be nice to Dad.”  Mark’s gracious comment was “At least my second team won.”

Back to the West Herts and it was all smiles.  It had been a thoroughly enjoyable team performance with some stand out individuals.  Zeegelaar had impressed greatly on his debut.  Cleverley had recovered from his last minute penalty miss at Goodsion Park with an assured performance in the centre of the park.  Gomes was absolutely brilliant in goal.  But the most impressive showing came from Hughes.  I had been thrilled when we bought him and rather sad that he seemed to have dropped into obscurity, but he was biding his time.  He put in a decent showing against Everton but was absolutely brilliant in this game and the goal was a just reward.  With players coming back from injury, apart from the goal keeping position, we now seem players who can slot in to any position without a loss of quality, which bodes very well for the rest of the season.

But the last comment should go to the Community Trust.  They have been a massive part of the club for a long time now.  From Ann Swanson’s work with the Junior Hornets in the 80s, this has grown into a huge asset for the local community.  Current Director, Rob Smith, has been tireless in growing the Trust for many years and it was rather fitting that Britt Assombalonga, who was discovered at one of the Trust’s schemes, scored for Middlesbrough on Sunday.  In these days when football seems to be all about money, it is great to see that the Trust is still valued at the club and the commemorative t-shirt, designed by 11 year-old Codie Snaith, which declares “We are Family” summed it up perfectly.

Pride Despite a Defeat

The 1881 banner in the family stand

The 1881 banner in the family stand

Early evening kick offs on a Saturday always play merry hell with my nerves.  I must have checked the kick-off time a dozen times in the morning, but I still made sure that I was in Watford in plenty of time should the kick off actually be at 3pm.  This meant that I was in the West Herts rather earlier than was strictly necessary, all the better for tracking the progress of our rivals for the European spots <cough>.

It had been a foul afternoon with persistent rain soaking me on the way to the West Herts but, thankfully, it eased off as we made our way to the ground.  It appears that the Christmas break has been so relaxing that my brain has ceased to work as, for the second game in a row, I tried to use my Oyster card to get through the turnstile.

Team news was that Holebas came in for the suspended Aké and Nyom replaced Anya.  So the starting line-up was Gomes, Holebas, Britos, Cathcart, Nyom, Watson, Capoue, Jurado, Deeney, Abdi and Ighalo.

Cathcart after launching a free kick

Cathcart after launching a free kick

Before the game, I wondered how our approach to this fixture would differ from the game at Eastlands where we looked to contain the opposition and I don’t remember us passing the half way line in the first half.  So I was delighted to see us attacking in the first minute as a lovely move from Jurado found Abdi by way of Deeney but sadly Almen shot over the bar.  Kolarov then had a couple of chances for the visitors, first a shot from distance that was well wide of the target, then a cross that Gomes gathered at the second attempt.  Ighalo’s first chance of the game came as a misclearance reached Abdi who played the Nigerian in but his shot was cleared for a corner.  Abdi then found Deeney in the box, where he was hacked down.  There were screams for a penalty from the home fans, but nothing was given.  Watford threatened again as Abdi found Ighalo who shook off his marker but the shot was saved by Hart.  Ighalo then won a free kick on the edge of the area.  A number around me were asking for an Abdi special, but it was Watson who stepped up and fired just over the bar.

Holebas making his way into the box for a corner

Holebas making his way into the box for a corner

Chants of “Where were you when you were sh*t,” were aimed at the Man City supporters, which was rather unfair given that City have always attracted good crowds.  The chant came straight back at us with, I have to say, somewhat more justification.  There was danger in the Watford box as Gomes parried a shot from De Bruyne but, thankfully, Aguero was unable to connect with the rebound.  Ighalo’s persistence won a corner for the Hornets, Cathcart connected with Watson’s delivery but the header was downwards and Hart was able to gather.  At the other end, Silva broke into the box but good defensive work by Britos and Watson meant that the ball rolled harmlessly through to Gomes.  Fernandinho then broke forward, his shot was saved by the feet of Gomes and Sterling’s follow-up was high and wide.  Aguero got the ball in space in the Watford box, but Cathcart closed him down brilliantly and the ball ended up in the side netting.  The only booking of the game came when Nyom took a dive and was shown a yellow card.  Lads as big as Nyom always look rather foolish when they take a tumble like that, so I really don’t know why they do it.  Watford had a chance to take the lead just before half time as a Watson free-kick was punched clear and Jurado’s follow-up was just wide of the target.  So we reached half-time goalless, just as we had at Eastlands in August, but this game couldn’t have been more different as we had been lively in attack, had matched the visitors and had the better goal chances.

Tony Coton with his trophy

Tony Coton with his trophy

At half time, Tommy Smith was on the pitch drawing the 50-50 tickets and reminiscing about his appearances in both of our previous Premier League seasons.  He was then joined by Tony Coton, who had been a star player during our spell in the top flight in the 80s.  When asked why he signed for Watford, his simple answer was “Graham Taylor.  You sit down and talk to Graham and he sells the club to you and you have no choice but to sign.”  Tommy then presented Tony with a trophy marking the fact that he is the only player to date to win the Player of the Season award on three occasions.  I think it was that man himself who mentioned that Deeney might match him if he continues playing as well as he has been.  Since Coton had also played at Man City, he was given a good reception by both sets of fans and said he had to hope that the score stayed as it was.

The second half at Eastlands had started with a goal for City, so I braced myself, but the first chance of the half was a shot for Watson that was pushed around the post by Hart.  The superb Watson was involved again as he took a free kick that was headed on by Cathcart in the direction of Deeney, but a last gasp clearance prevented the ball reaching Troy.  City had their best chance of the game so far on 52 minutes as a Silva corner was met with a great header from Fernandinho that was just over the bar.

All smiles after the goal

All smiles after the goal

But it was the Hornets who took the lead two minutes later.  Jurado had played a through ball to Ighalo, who won a corner.  Watson’s delivery found its way past Hart via the head of Kolarov.  There were mad celebrations and a period of bouncing in the Rookery although that petered out as all eyes were on a City attack that, thankfully, came to nothing.  Watford continued to attack as Nyom played the ball in to Ighalo, but there were two City defenders in attendance to stop him shooting.  The first substitution came on the hour as Sterling, who had been so influential in the earlier tie, was replaced by Navas for the visitors.  A brilliant run by Holebas finished with a shot that was blocked by Ighalo of all people.  At the other end, De Bruyne cut the ball back to Touré who hit his shot well over the target.  De Bruyne was the next to threaten the Watford goal with a shot that was tipped wide by Gomes.  Touré then tried a shot from distance that was wide of the target.  It occurred to me at this point that it was a while since I had sat down, which is unusual in the Rookery as the crowd tends to stand only during periods of high tension, then the penny dropped.  Watford had another decent chance as Holebas played the ball in to Abdi, but the shot was wide of the target.  City made their second substitution as Bony came on for Mangala.  Watford had a great chance to increase their lead as Capoue broke into the box and beat the defender, but the ball took an awkward bounce and his shot was not as clean as it could have been and flew wide of the target.  Watford’s first substitution came after 80 minutes with Guedioura coming on for Jurado who went off to an ovation and his name being sung.  It was a nice contrast to the grief that he often gets from the crowd, but this was by some way his best performance to date in a Watford shirt.

Man of the Match Watson lines up a free kick

Man of the Match Watson lines up a free kick

I blame myself entirely for what happened next.  I dropped my pen and could not locate it, so felt in my bag and retrieved the pen that I had used for the Tottenham game.  I thought about rooting about for an alternative but decided against it, I was soon to regret that decision when City hit their equalizer.  I couldn’t see it properly as it was at the other end of the ground but television pictures show that Touré met Kolarov’s corner with a stunning volley.  Hearts broke in the home stands as City got their second a couple of minutes later as Sagna broke forward and hit a gorgeous cross for Aguero to head past Gomes.  Given the performance of the Hornets, it felt beyond cruel that we were behind and, for the first time in the game, the City fans were in full voice.  Almost immediately, Pellegrini made another substitution which appeared designed to waste time as Demichelis came on for Aguero after a false start when Silva’s number was shown.  Neither of the possible substitutes was in a hurry to leave the field.  Watford pushed for an equalizer as Guedioura played Ighalo in, but Hart was able to block the shot.  Deep into injury time, Deeney tried to find Ighalo but the ball was headed clear and the visitors left Vicarage Road with all three points.  Despite the disappointment, many in the crowd stayed to cheer the Watford players for what had been a tremendous performance.  Ben Watson was, quite rightly, given Man of the Match, but special mention should go to Jurado for a sparkling display and Holebas who, earlier in the season, had been rumoured to be on his way out due to his poor attitude put in a tremendous shift and meant that we didn’t miss Aké as we might have done.

Gathering for a corner

Gathering for a corner

As we made our way out of the ground there was a feeling of dejection and many comments along the lines that we hadn’t deserved that defeat.  To go in to the last 10 minutes in the lead and then conceded two goals in quick succession was very hard to take.  But, once the dust settled, I felt a lot happier.  Before the game I had been thinking back to the match at their place earlier in the season when we didn’t have a shot on target.  While I understood the approach, it had been very difficult to watch.  In this game, we had matched City and were beaten by two excellent pieces of skill as our defence tired.  Prior to the tough run of Christmas games, there was an expectation that we would see what this team was made of.  As we finish that period with 4 points and disappointment as we deserved more from the two defeats, I find myself bursting with pride and the feeling that we can take on any team in this division.  As we left the ground, we went through the GT stand and enjoyed the wonderful banners that commemorate the great man’s time at the club.  I have always regarded those banners with a tinge of sadness that we would never witness times like that again.  On Saturday, I found that sadness no longer existed.  This is a truly wonderful time to be a Watford fan.

 

No Goal Attempts but Impressive Defence

A gorgeous pre-match pub

A gorgeous pre-match pub

Another departure at the crack of dawn.  A rail strike and bank holiday engineering work threatened to disrupt the journey but, fortunately, everything ran to schedule.  On our last visit to Manchester, we had been turned away from our designated pre-match pub and ended up in a Wetherspoons.  So this time we had chosen a meeting place that was slightly out of town.  As I approached the pub and saw that the doors were closed, I was a little concerned that we would end up finding that the walk out of the city had been in vain.  However, just before John and I reached the doors, they opened to welcome us and we were soon sitting in a comfy corner of a beautiful pub with a couple of lovely pints in front of us and all was right with the world.

On arrival at the Etihad, I instantly regretted buying one of the seats in the top tier as it was a hell of a trek up there, although good practice for our trip to Newcastle.  When the teams were announced on the big screen, there was a duplication of Christian names so we had Heurelho Nyom and Sebastian Jurado.  I was a little disappointed not to see Valon Deeney in the team.  The starting line-up showed one change as Abdi replaced Anya so was Gomes, Holebas, Cathcart, Prödl, Nyom, Capoue, Behrami, Abdi, Ighalo, Jurado and Deeney.  When the team lined up, the apparent 4-2-3-1 formation became 4-2-4-0 as Deeney was playing out wide on the right.  The tannoy guy repeatedly welcomed us to the ‘newly expanded’ stadium.  It has to be said that the new upper tier was pretty deserted and so far from the pitch that I needed to find the distance glasses that I rarely use.

The pre-match huddle

The pre-match huddle

Prior to the match we also found out that Daniel Pudil had moved (on loan) to Sheffield Wednesday.  I will miss muttering “Who killed Danny?” as he collapsed under an innocuous challenge.  But, I will particularly miss seeing the photos of his family in and around Watford.  To see a player who has moved from overseas proudly posting photos of his wife and son in Cassiobury Park made me ridiculously happy.  Sadly Dan never looked likely to be part of the Premier League plans, but he will be remembered fondly for his contributions on the pitch and his proudly embracing Watford as his home.

As may have been expected, Agüero was an immediate threat on the Watford goal.  His first foray forward was closed down by the Watford defence, the next resulted in a shot that was blocked by Cathcart.  Watford’s first attack saw Layun play the ball out to Holebas whose cross was headed clear by Kompany.  The resulting corner led to a bit of a goalmouth scramble with a couple of shots blocked before the ball was cleared.  At the other end, a cross in the direction of Agüero was cut out by Prödl.  The corner by Silva was also headed clear by the Austrian.

Abdi on the ball

Abdi on the ball

The Watford goal was threatened further as, first, Navas played a cross into the box which flew off target, then a free kick from Kolarov curled wide of the far post.  Watford caused themselves problems as Jurado gave the ball away, Sterling broke into the box but was tackled by Cathcart for a corner.  Then Gomes was called into action, dropping to save a shot from Sagna.  The best chance of a goal so far came as Sterling broke into the box with only Gomes to beat, the keeper stopped the shot, but the ball squirmed out of his hands and, thankfully, rolled out for a corner.  A rare Watford attack ended when a Nyom cross from distance was easily gathered by Hart.  The home side threatened again as the ball was taken off Abdi’s feet and Agüero hit a shot that flew just wide of the target.  The first booking of the game went to the home side as Kompany was punished for a foul on Jurado.  The cards were evened up soon after Nyom was booked for flying through the back of Sterling.  The Frenchman’s reaction was priceless as he expressed his outrage by mimicking Sterling’s dramatic collapse.  I have a certain sympathy with his annoyance at the player’s dramatic reaction, but he probably shouldn’t have knocked him flying in the first place.  The Hornets had their longest spell of possession in the half in time added on, but, typically of their defensive approach to the game, it finished with a pass back to Gomes.

Half-time conversations expressed pleasure at the strong defensive performance of the Hornets, but concern that we had no player up front so never looked likely to score.

Deeney attacks

Deeney on the attack

At the start of the second half Pellegrini made a change, bringing Nasri on for Navas and changing the formation to put two up front.  This immediately paid dividends as Sagna crossed to the far post and Sterling ghosted in to tap the ball past Gomes.  The home side were soon two goals ahead as a Touré free-kick hit the wall, Watford failed to clear so the ball reached Fernandinho who hit a powerful shot across Gomes and into the far corner.  At this point it looked like City may score a hat full, especially when Agüero attacked again but on this occasion he mishit his shot which spun before being caught easily by Gomes.  A rare forward passing move by the Hornets finished when a cross from Layun was cut out by Kompany, the City break was stopped (not for the first time) by a tackle from Cathcart.  On the hour mark Flores made his first substitution replacing Abdi with Anya.  This appeared to be an uncharacteristically attacking substitution.  City’s next break by Agüero was stopped by Prödl who was booked for the infringement.  Silva took the resulting free kick, which flew just wide.  Watford’s best move of the game came as Jurado broke into the box, his low cross was dummied by Deeney and reached Anya whose cross was blocked for a corner.  Watford’s second substitution saw Layun on for Ighalo, much to the disappointment of many in the away end who would have liked to have seen Vydra given a chance.  City brought Delph on for Silva.

Anya down the wing

Anya down the wing

City had a great chance to increase their lead as Nasri released Kolorov, his cross was met by Touré whose shot flew just wide.  The final substitution for the Hornets saw Watson come on for Capoue to loud boos from the home fans who haven’t forgiven him for winning the FA Cup for Wigan.  Some of the Watford fans were equally unhappy at this substitution as Vydra’s name rang out again in the away end.  Another Watford attack came to nothing as Jurado played the ball out to Layun whose low cross was straight at Joe Hart.  As City seemed to settle for a two goal win, there were a couple of late attacks by the Hornets.  First Anya broke forward but his cross was behind Deeney and cut out before it reached Layun.  Nasri tried a shot from outside the box that was saved by Gomes.  The last action of the game was a shot from distance by Layun that was weak and flew well wide of the target.  At the end of the game, a frustrated-looking Deeney tried to cheer up a couple of people in the away end by throwing his boots into the crowd.

It was hard to know how to feel after this game.  The defensive set-up had worked in so far as we only conceded two goals against the best team in the division.  However, for someone who came to football watching Graham Taylor’s attacking teams, it is really difficult to watch a team that not only don’t have a shot on goal but don’t look as though they want one.  We have now gone two games without a shot on target, although in the Southampton game that wasn’t for lack of trying.  Between now and the next game are the end of the transfer window and an international break so predictions of what we will see in the Swansea match are futile at this point.

On the way home I heard that Forestieri had joined Pudil at Wednesday, with Fernando’s being a permanent move.  This was another sad piece of news if only because Forestieri never reached his potential.  Fernando was a player who was loved for his enthusiasm while he irritated for his poor judgement.  But he is probably the only player in history to have tweeted a photo of himself buying a toaster in the pound shop and he also had a crucial part in *that goal*.  For those reasons he will always have a place in Hornet history.