Tag Archives: James McCarthy

Deprived of Sleep and Entertainment

A kind welcome in the concourse

I had to be on the East coast of the US for work on Friday.  Travelling overnight to attend a football match felt like old times as I did that frequently when I lived there.  I was thankful that the flight was on time and I managed to get a few hours sleep so didn’t feel too bad on arrival.  Before I went to sleep on the flight, I took one last chance to watch the Match of the Day highlights of the Liverpool game.  I needed that positivity before a trip to Selhurst Park.  I was home just after 9am, so had plenty of time to shower, change and pack my bag for the football before heading for South London.

Having taken the wrong exit out of East Croydon station, I was somewhat disorientated, but finally found the pub and was pleased to find Jacque and Richard already there, we were later joined by Mike.  As we were readying to leave for the game, Mike had a sudden realisation that he had not brought his match ticket with him.  He contemplated returning home and, hopefully, making it back for the second half, but after a few panicked texts, he secured a replacement and so was able to see the whole game.  Whether that was a positive thing is open to question.  On the platform waiting for the train to Selhurst, we met a very friendly and pleasant Palace fan who engaged us in conversation.  He was full of praise about our performance against Liverpool last week and far from confident about his team’s prospects for the game.  We were appreciative of the praise but also shared his lack of confidence regarding our chances.

Femenia takes a throw-in

Team news was that Pearson had made just the one enforced change with Pereyra replacing the injured Deulofeu.  So, the starting line-up was Foster; Masina, Cathcart, Kabasele, Femenía; Hughes, Capoue; Pereyra, Doucouré, Sarr; Deeney.  While there were no ex-Watford players in the Palace team, they do have the lovely Ray Lew in their dugout, which means that I find it hard to wish them ill.

The first attack of note came from the Hornets as Hughes broke down the right and succeeded in reaching the penalty area where he was frustrated by a great tackle from Kouyaté.  Watford had a decent chance to take the lead after quarter of an hour when Doucouré beat a couple of defenders before shooting from a tight angle, but Guaita in the Palace goal was equal to his effort, Sarr latched onto the follow-up but his shot was blocked and deflected wide.  There was a rather strange incident as Hughes was fouled, but the ball broke for Sarr so the referee allowed advantage to be played.  However, Sarr was then flagged offside and, instead of bringing play back, the free kick went to the home side.  A baffling decision that was rightly protested by Watford’s players and fans, but the referee wasn’t moved.

Doucoure on the attack as Deeney and Capoue look on

The Hornets threatened again as Doucouré and Sarr broke forward while exchanging passes, but the resulting shots were blocked allowing the home side to break down the other end where Foster came out to head a lofted ball clear.  Watford had another chance to break the deadlock as Hughes cut inside and shot just wide of the far post.  The first chance for the home side came as Zaha found van Aanholt in the box but his cross was blocked by Foster and bounced off the Palace man for a goal kick.  It had been all Watford, so it was incredibly frustrating when the home side scored on 28 minutes after a counterattack, McArthur found Ayew on the edge of the box and he shot between two defenders and past Foster’s outstretched hand.  The defenders in question, Cathcart and Masina, really should have done better.  Kabasele had been down injured after a challenge during the attack that led to the goal, so VAR was invoked but the goal stood and, thankfully, Christian was able to continue after treatment.  The first booking of the game went to Femenía for pulling Zaha over.  Watford had a decent chance to hit back when Masina played a lovely ball over the top to Pereyra but he couldn’t position himself to take advantage and Guaita gathered the ball.  Zaha was then booked for a pull on Capoue.  The Palace man then went down very easily under a challenge from Hughes, which infuriated the Watford players.  The decision went against Zaha who was fortunate to avoid a second yellow.

Hughes readies to take a corner

So, we went into the half time break a goal behind to Palace’s only real shot of the half.  The Hornets were also unfortunate in the half time penalty shoot-out.  Although young Lucy from Watford was a star, scoring and impressing the commentator by celebrating with a cartwheel.

The first incident of note in the second half was a prolonged period of handbags after Capoue fouled Zaha.  There was a VAR check for a possible red card but, in the end, there were just cautions for Capoue and Kouyaté.  The game restarted with a free kick for Palace in a dangerous position which came to nothing as van Aanholt’s delivery was headed over by Ayew.  The next caution of the game went to Doucouré after pulling Zaha back.  Zaha was the next to create a scoring chance but Foster stood tall and the shot bounced off him.  The Hornets had a chance of their own as a free kick from Pereyra dropped for Deeney whose shot was blocked.  Then a lovely passing move from the Hornets finished with Pereyra shooting straight at Guaita.  There was another booking as Benteke was cautioned for a foul on Sarr having caught the youngster’s heel as he tried to escape.

Ignacio Pussetto

There was a half-chance for the Hornets as, from a Sarr cross, a mix up in the Palace defence almost allowed Hughes in but, eventually, Guaita gathered the ball.  Midway through the second period, Watford had the best chance of the half so far when Deeney tried a shot from distance that required a smart save from Guaita to tip it over.  There was another decent chance soon after when Sarr chipped the ball into the box for Doucouré whose looping header looked to be going in until Guaita pushed it around the post.  From the resulting corner, the ball reached Hughes whose shot from the edge of the area was blocked.  With 20 minutes to go, Hodgson made his first change, bringing Milivojevic on for McArthur.  The home side had a decent chance to increase their lead as Benteke tried a bicycle kick that hit the side netting.  With 15 minutes remaining, Pearson made a double substitution replacing Pereyra and Deeney with Pussetto and Welbeck.  The Hornets created a half chance as a long ball found Pussetto, who delivered a low cross for Sarr, but Guaita was the first to the ball.  Pearson made his final substitution bringing Gray on for Hughes, who left the field in front of the travelling Hornets and was warmly applauded.  There were five minutes of added time, but the only action of note was a chance for the home side to increase their lead as Benteke found Ayew, but Foster dived at his feet to avert the danger.

Masina takes a free kick

So, after the euphoria of last week, this was an unwelcome return to what has been the reality of most of this season.  It was a very disappointing game.  The Hornets had been the better team for most of the first half but, as so often this season, did not make the most of their chances and the home side scored after a counterattack.  Once they were ahead, Palace defended well and, apart from a brief spell in the second half, Watford never really looked like winning the point that their performance deserved.  Thankfully results elsewhere meant that we stayed out of the relegation zone on goal difference, but it felt like a wasted opportunity and, again, I worry that we won’t get the points that we need from the upcoming “winnable” games.

Another disappointment was the away crowd.  Last season, one of our party had made complaints when the gangway next to us had filled with fans who celebrated aggressively and caused injury to someone in our group.  The complaint had been referred to Croydon council, so we hoped to see an improvement in the stewarding on this occasion.  It was not apparent early in the game as a number of Watford fans started to take up positions in the gangway.  The stewards made some attempts to move these lads on, but most of their efforts led to complaints which meant that, for periods of the game, my view of one of the few sections of the pitch that I could otherwise see was blocked by stewards arguing with fans.  I have often said that I enjoy visiting Selhurst Park, but I realise now that this came from a time before our promotion when there were always a loads of spare seats in the away end and you could choose where to sit.  In those days I took up a place in the wooden seats at the back that were usually populated by those who wanted to stand and sing.  Nowadays everybody stands which means that, if you need to sit, you have no chance of seeing the game.  Added to that, even if you stand, if you are 5’6”, as I am, you won’t see a lot of the action

Our post-match analysis was to take place at Richard’s.  He lives in South London and he and his lovely wife had kindly invited us back for dinner and drinks.  When the football is as poor as it was on Saturday, a lovely evening with friends is all the therapy that you need.

 

Rainbows on a Happier Day at the Vic

Hayden Mullins

My journey to Watford took slightly longer than usual as I hadn’t factored in the strike timetable on the final leg of the journey.  As we arrived at the Junction, a Palace fan tried to engage a fella in front of me regarding our prospects for the game.  I responded that I wasn’t expecting anything, he countered that we always beat them.  We concluded that we would both be happy with a point and went our separate ways wishing each other well.

After that surprisingly pleasant encounter I headed for the West Herts and arrived just before Don left for the ground.  It being the 10th anniversary of that amazing goal, glasses were raised with the toast “Happy Doyley Day.”  Needless to say, there was also a lot of discussion about our new head coach.  I have to say that I am happy with the appointment and the consensus of our group was that Pearson is just what we need at the moment.  He did great things at Leicester and was credited with building the team that won the Premier League.  He will also take no nonsense and we certainly need that attitude.  As we watched Duncan Ferguson’s Everton beat Chelsea and recoiled in terror every time the camera gave a close up of big Dunc, I could only hope that Nigel would have the same effect at Watford.

Kiko Femenia leaving Zaha for a moment to take a throw-in

As it was Watford’s “Rainbow Laces” match, there was a rainbow carpet welcoming all to the Hornet shop and there were Premier League representatives handing out laces to passing fans.  I took some and just need to find a pair of boots with which to wear them.

Due to the late appointment of Pearson, Hayden Mullins was in charge again, facing his former club.  Team news was that he had made two changes from the Leicester game with Kabasele and Pereyra coming in for Mariappa and Hughes.  So, the starting line-up was Foster; Masina, Cathcart, Kabasele, Femenía; Capoue, Doucouré; Pereyra, Deulofeu, Sarr; Deeney.  In the opposition dug out was our old friend and hero Ray Lewington.  I love to see him back at Vicarage Road.

I was not in the ground in time to see Pearson introduced to the crowd, but I was there when Emma asked us to thank Hayden Mullins for his stewardship while we were between managers.  He was rewarded with very warm applause from the crowd and responded in kind.

Capoue on the ball

There was a great early chance for the Hornets as Sarr turned and broke forward before playing in Femenía who crossed for Deeney who was unable to make a decent contact.  At the other end, the visitors threatened but Ayew’s cross was hit straight to Foster.  The Hornets gifted the visitors with a great chance to take the lead when a mishit clearance reached McArthur who should have done better but, thankfully, shot wide of the far post.  The home side then had a great chance of their own as Femenía put a lovely cross in for Sarr, who tried to turn the ball in at the near post, but it was blocked for a corner.  Sarr again executed a lovely turn and run but, on this occasion, his cross was headed to safety.  The Hornets won a free kick in a dangerous position on the edge of the Palace box, but Pereyra’s delivery was straight at the wall.  The first booking of the game went to Doucouré, who stuck a leg out to bring Ayew down.  Off the field, there were complaints of bullying in the Rookery as Trevor, who sits in front of us and is a QPR fan (his wife is Watford), objected to the number of people wishing him “Happy Doyley Day”!  Kabasele and Zaha tangled, there was some afters and the Palace man was penalised and booked, much to the amusement of the Watford faithful.  There was then the ridiculous sight of Cathcart being shown a yellow card for a pass because Milivojevic had challenged him as he kicked the ball and had fallen over Cathcart’s feet.  The first half ended with a lovely move from the Hornets that finished with Deulofeu playing a square ball to Sarr who shot well over the target.

So, we reached the break with the game goalless and without a shot on target, but it had been a very positive half of football from the Hornets.

Deulofeu takes a corner

At half time, representatives from the Proud Hornets and Proud and Palace were interviewed about their groups’ efforts to ensure that LGBT+ supporters feel welcome at football matches.  The Hornets representative was particularly enthusiastic about the rainbow display in the Rookery at this time last year that they worked on with the 1881.  It was very impressive and a really positive gesture towards inclusivity.

The visitors made a change at the break bringing Riedewald on for Schlupp.  The Hornets had two goal chances in the first couple of minutes of the second half.  First a free kick from Deulofeu was met by the head of Doucouré, but the header was an easy save for Guaita in the Palace goal.  Then Pereyra played in Deulofeu but, again, the shot was straight at the Palace keeper.  The next chance fell to Capoue, but his shot from outside the area was high and wide.  Deulofeu looked as though he would open the scoring as he escaped from the Palace defence, but his shot was just wide of the near post.  My heart was in my mouth when Masina and Zaha tangled in the box, but it was the Palace man that was adjudged to have been the aggressor.  At this point the Palace fans were expressing their ire regarding the referee, the Watford faithful responded with “This referee’s all right!”.

Pereyra, Deulofeu and Masina line up a free kick

Watford threatened again as Deulofeu played a short corner to Pereyra who played a return pass, but the curling effort from Geri was easy for Guaita.  At the other end, Zaha found McArthur whose shot was well over the target.  A promising run by Deulofeu was stopped by a foul from Tomkins that earned a yellow card.  Palace then made their second substitution bringing Benteke on for Townsend.  A lovely ball into the Palace box from Deulofeu appeared to be heading for the near post but Guaita was lurking and Sarr just failed to turn it in at close range.  Into the final 15 minutes of the game and Mullins made two substitutions in quick succession with Gray and Chalobah replacing Pereyra and Doucouré.  Between the substitutions, McArthur made a foray into the Watford box but was stopped by a great tackle from Kabasele.  The visitors then had their best chance of the game with a powerful shot from Ayew that just cleared the bar.  Watford were still fighting to make the breakthrough and Sarr played a cross to Deulofeu which was a little too deep so narrowed the angle for Geri who crossed back for Ismaïla, who could only head wide under a challenge from Cahill.  The final substitution for Palace saw Kouyaté replaced by McCarthy.

Femenia, Doucoure and Sarr

Sarr had yet another chance to open the scoring, but his shot was turned wide by Cahill.  A corner was then played back in by Cathcart to Sarr but the shot was high and wide.  The game was getting rather tetchy and Femenía was the next to go into the referee’s book after hauling Zaha down.  From the free kick, Watford cleared and launched a counter-attack as Sarr powered downfield before crossing for Gray who was coming into the box at speed and could only shoot straight at Guaita.  There were shouts for a penalty when Deeney was pulled over by Cahill as he tried to reach a cross into the box by Masina.  The referee waved play on but, soon after, Deeney was awarded a free kick for a much more innocuous foul on the wing and was clearly asking the referee why that was an infringement when the one in the box wasn’t.  He appeared dissatisfied with the explanation.  There had been an ongoing niggle between Capoue and Zaha and the Watford man was finally cautioned for a push on his opponent to stop him escaping.  It was a very “Capoue” foul.  Watford had a final chance to grab the winner as a shot from Deeney was caught by Guaita while Sarr challenged.  The youngster went down in the incident and was lying on the goalline.  Gray and Deeney told him in no uncertain terms to get on with the game and Troy dragged him to his feet with a force that could have dislocated his shoulder!!  That was the last chance of the game which remained goalless despite the efforts of the Hornets.

Graham Stack congratulating Ben Foster at the end of the game

The game finished with some unresolved handbags.  Zaha was still arguing about how hard done by he had been as Chalobah put an arm around him and accompanied him off.

Back to the West Herts and the smiles were back on our faces.  That had been a much better performance from the Hornets who looked like a cohesive team and worked very hard.  The defence had been well-organised and the much maligned Femenía had put in an excellent performance keeping Zaha very quiet and contributing to his frustration.  Sarr had again put in a great performance and is finally showing us what he can do.  It was also pleasing to see Deulofeu put in a considerably better showing than he had in midweek.  It is great to see Deeney back, his leadership makes such a difference to the team even if he isn’t scoring.  All in all, it had been an enjoyable afternoon at the Vic and we haven’t had many of those this season.

So, while we are still at the foot of the table, I find myself feeling much more positive about our prospects for the rest of the season, even if the next two games are unlikely to be a lot of fun.

Much Improved Performance Against the Toffees

Waiting for the ball to drop

Waiting for the ball to drop

It seems like a very long time since our trip to Goodison Park for the first game of the season.  At that time, the memory of our last visit (and the Chris Powell ‘handball’) loomed large, but the spirited draw was the first sign that this would be a much more enjoyable season.  Even though we have been on a poor run of late, it is worth remembering that we are guaranteed to finish higher than in our last two seasons at this level and, while we are not mathematically safe from relegation, it looks highly unlikely that we will get dragged into a fight against the drop.  There was some great news prior to the game as we heard that the U18s had won their league.

While we had been bemoaning our own recent poor form, it was easy to forget that Everton have also been on a bad run.  So it was a bit shocking to see a ‘Martinez Out’ banner unfurled in the away stand before kick-off.

For those of a nervous disposition, the team news did nothing to quell their jitters as Flores had made five changes bringing Paredes, Britos, Holebas, Behrami and Jurado in for Nyom, Prödl, Aké, Suárez and Abdi.  While we had been awful last week, the almost complete overhaul of the defence caused some concern.  So the starting line-up was Gomes, Holebas, Cathcart, Britos, Paredes, Behrami, Watson, Capoue, Deeney, Jurado and Ighalo.

Jurado on the ball

Jurado on the ball

The first action of the game was indicative of what was to follow as Deeney tackled Barkley who collapsed like a spoilt child and won a free kick.  On the positive side, any concerns about the return of Holebas were quelled when he stopped an Everton break with a great saving tackle.  Kevin Friend had set his stall out early by penalising every Watford challenge, so it was no surprise when the first booking went to Capoue for a foul on Barkley, although it was the Watford man who required the longest period of treatment following the challenge.  Watford’s first goal attempt came after quarter of an hour when Paredes intercepted the ball and went on a run before passing to Behrami, he found Jurado who unleashed a fantastic shot that required a decent save from Robles.  When Watson was fouled on the edge of the box, Mr Friend was forced to wave play on as it was he who had taken the Watford man down.  The resultant Everton break was made to a chorus of boos particularly when Gomes had to make a sharp save to deny Deulofeu.  Watford attacked again after Holebas intercepted the ball before feeding Jurado who made a lovely turn, but his pass towards Deeney was too heavy.  Then Paredes found Ighalo whose shot was cleared.  Lukaku tried a shot from distance but, under challenge, he hit it well over the bar.

Celebrating the goal

Celebrating the goal

A move that was started by Ighalo finished with Jurado playing the ball back to Watson who shot straight at the keeper.  In the Watford box, Barry went down looking for a penalty which, fortunately, wasn’t given, the ball broke to Barkley whose shot was caught by Gomes.  Jurado exchanged passes with Holebas on the wing but his cross was straight at the keeper.  Then a cross from Holebas was met by a misdirected header from Ighalo which flew wide.  Just before half time, Watford had a good chance to take the lead as a Jurado free kick rebounded off the wall and Capoue’s follow-up was deflected just wide of the far post.  From Watson’s corner, Holebas headed just wide.  But it was the visitors who took the lead in time added on at the end of the half, as Britos lost out to McCarthy on the edge of the box and he finished past Gomes.  I felt so sorry for Britos, who was clearly devastated at his mistake.  But, at a time when the team needed the crowd to get behind them, one of my neighbours in the Rookery decided that the appropriate response was to boo very loudly.  Not for the first time, I told him exactly what I thought of him.  It made me feel a bit better, but what happened on the pitch next lightened my mood considerably.  Ighalo’s harrying forced Robles to concede a corner.  Ben Watson’s delivery to the far post was met by Holebas, whose header took a deflection before hitting the net and sending the home crowd into raptures.

So we were level at half-time, which was probably fair in an even game of few goal attempts.

The half time shoot out had reached the semi-final phase and was a cracking contest between Sacred Heart and St Paul’s with the latter prevailing during sudden death.  Both teams were applauded off the pitch with an enthusiasm that these contests rarely inspire.

Guedioura lines up a corner

Guedioura lines up a corner

Guedioura had spent the break on the pitch warming up, so it was no surprise when he replaced Behrami at the start of the second half.  Early in the half, irritation with the ref went up a notch as Ighalo was pushed over by Jagielka and nothing was given when Barkley appeared to get the benefit of the doubt every time he went to ground.  The first goal attempt of the half came 10 minutes in and took some remarkable work from Gomes to keep the scores level as he parried a shot from Lennon and then, somehow, prevented Lukaku reaching the loose ball.  At the other end, Watford had a free kick in a dangerous position, Watson played it short to Holebas whose shot went through the wall, but the pace was taken off and it was easy for Robles to gather.  Guedioura went on a great run, played the ball out to Deeney who crossed for Ighalo who couldn’t quite turn it in.  Watford’s second substitution saw Amrabat on for Jurado who had played very well.  Gomes was the hero again as Deulofeu broke into the box, he managed to shoot, despite a challenge from Paredes, and the Brazilian was down to make the save.  Martinez made his first substitution on 65 minutes replacing Barkley (who was booed off by the Watford faithful due to his tedious theatrics) with Tom Cleverley who was applauded on to the field for his Player of the Season turn as a loanee.  Everton threatened again as Coleman ran the length of the field, but his cross was safely caught by Gomes.

Ighalo, Deeney and Capoue challenge in the box

Ighalo, Deeney and Capoue challenge in the box

The visitors had a great chance to take the lead as Lukaku played a neat back heel to Lennon whose shot was kept out by yet another superb save from Gomes.  As we reached the last 10 minutes, each side made a substitution with Mirallas coming on for Deulofeu and Suárez replacing Capoue.  Everton could have won the game in the last couple of minutes of normal time as Mirallas won a free kick on the edge of the box.  His delivery was parried by Gomes and hearts were in mouths as Lukaku’s follow-up rebounded off the crossbar.  Lukaku had another chance to snatch a winner as he met a cross from Coleman with a header but he directed it downwards and it was easy for Gomes.  In time added on, it was Watford who had a chance to get the winner as Amrabat played the ball back to Watson whose long range shot took a deflection and appeared to be heading for the top corner when Robles pulled off a great save to keep it out.  Guedioura was the next with a sight of goal, but he shot well over the bar.  Each side had one final half chance to snatch a winner.  First the visitors as Barry met a free kick with a header that was saved comfortably by Gomes.  Then Suárez found Ighalo whose shot was disappointingly soft and easy for Robles.

So, the final whistle went on what had been a very entertaining game of football and a pleasing point for both teams after their recent run of defeats.  Watford had been much brighter than of late and the return of Capoue to a central position did both him and us a favour.

Post-game, I had a quick chat with Mick Smithers, Watford’s Football Liaison Officer, who mentioned that the Everton fans had been delightful.  This was backed up by Karoline the Roadie who said they had been the nicest group of fans to visit Vicarage Road this season.

It is hard to believe that there are only two more home games left in this season but, before the next we have a trip to West Bromwich, a final hurrah at the Boleyn and a semi-final at Wembley.  A lot to look forward to and let’s hope that the team go into them with the positive approach that they took today.

A Pleasing Start

Pre-match formalities with a silly arch

Pre-match formalities with a silly arch

There was a certain element of groundhog day as the fixture computer gave us Everton away for the first game of the season, just as they did on our last visit to the Premier League. On that occasion, I left Watford at the crack of dawn on match day in order to visit Anthony Gormley’s Another Place on Crosby Beach, a place that I have come to love. The decision to add a distraction from the football was justified when we were robbed of a point due to a referee penalizing Chris Powell for a handball which actually struck his head. On arrival back at Watford Junction that evening, I bumped into Graham Simpson whose reaction to my concerns about that sort of luck plaguing our season was typically stroppy. I was saddened to be proved correct come the following May.

In the light of my previous experience, it was, perhaps, tempting fate to add a cultural element to Saturday’s visit to Liverpool. But, as my train arrived very early, I arranged to meet a friend at the Walker Gallery and thoroughly enjoyed my visit. Normal matchday protocol was soon resumed as the usual suspects gathered in a lovely old pub for beer and delicious pies. There was a lot of discussion pre-match about the propensity for pundits to predict our immediate relegation without having a clue about our manager or players. A bit of pragmatism was introduced as we acknowledged that most of us were equally ignorant of how our new recruits would perform and whether the team would gel in time.

Jurado ready to take a corner

Jurado ready to take a corner

The taxi driver who took us to the ground was clearly a red as he wished us luck while commenting that the Everton fans were expecting to thrash us. I can’t say that I doubted their confidence. Despite the feeling that we had made some quality signings during the Summer, I was feeling rather flat at the prospect of the new season.

Flores’s first competitive line-up included six new signings. The team was Gomes, Holebas, Prodl, Cathcart, Nyom, Behrami, Capoue, Layun, Jurado, Anya and Deeney. Former Watford loanee and Player of the Season, Tom Cleverley started for Everton.

As the formalities started before the game, there was a silly arch on the pitch that seemed to have no purpose beyond decoration. Also, I must admit that I didn’t hear Z-cars, which saddened me a bit. But, finally, the build-up was over and the game kicked off.

Celebrating Layun's strike

Celebrating Layun’s strike

The first goal action came in the 12th minute from the visitors as a Capoue cross was touched back by Layun to Deeney who tried a bicycle kick that flew wide. A minute later, Watford took the lead as a Deeney shot was blocked, it fell to Layun who hit it beautifully into the corner. The away end erupted with joy and, apologies for the blurred photo, but it was all I could do to point the camera, I couldn’t stop my hands shaking. Everton nearly equalized five minutes later as a corner from Mirallis was headed goalwards by Barry but Gomes was on hand to tip the ball over the bar. Capoue and Jurado exchanged passes, but the return was taken off the Frenchman’s feet. A through ball to Anya came to nothing as Howard was first to it. On 25 minutes, I saw a couple of fans that I know taking their seats. I had heard that the coaches were delayed and could only sympathise that they had missed our (opening) goal. It wasn’t until I got home that I discovered that the traffic queues on the M6 were caused by a friend of mine breaking down in the outside lane. She missed the game completely and insult was added to injury when she found out that her seat would have been very close to that occupied by her beloved professor Almen Abdi.

Prodl lines up a free kick

Prodl lines up a free kick

Back to the game and Everton had a lot of possession, but the Watford lads were doing a great job of frustrating them, constantly snapping at their feet and giving them no space at all such that it took nearly half an hour for the home side’s first goal attempt from open play which was a Barkley shot from distance that flew well over the bar. Barkley’s next attempt came soon after and was considerably more dangerous, a shot from the left of the area that required a touch from Gomes to keep it out. Cleverley was the next to threaten the Watford goal, but his cross-cum-shot was weak and easily gathered by the Watford keeper. A Barkley cross was headed clear by Holebas. Then Nyom appeared to be beaten on the wing, but caught his player, dispossessed him and went haring away with the ball, it was a real shame that this piece of joyous skill came to nothing as, when the ball eventually reached Capoue, he shot straight at Howard. Anya crossed for Deeney in the Everton box, but Stones fell on the ball which then broke to Galloway and Troy’s attempt to retrieve the ball left the Everton player on the floor and earned the Watford man a yellow card. Gomes came out to deal with a long ball and, as he was close to the edge of his area, pushed it clear of the attacking player. The home fans behind the goal appealed that he’d handled outside the box, but we were in line with it and it looked a legitimate move. There were smiles on Hornet faces again as Jurado nutmegged his man, the ball eventually reached Layun who shot just wide of the far post.

Gomes takes a free kick

Gomes takes a free kick

So we reached half time a goal to the good. But the smiles in the away end were as much to do with the performance, which had been disciplined to the extent of restricting the home team mostly to desperate shots from distance. Our defence, which came in for some criticism last season, looked solid. As a fan of Angella, it hurts me to admit this, but Prodl and Cathcart look like a formidable partnership. The quality of our other new recruits was clear to see and the concerns about the team gelling had been quelled. These were clearly lads who had met before.

It was unsurprising that Everton changed their shape in the second half and became more of a challenge. The first chance fell to Lukaku whose shot from a narrow angle was straight at Gomes. A long clearance from the Watford keeper reached Deeney whose downward header was gathered by Howard. Mirallas made a run down the wing and crossed, but Gomes punched for a corner that he comfortably gathered. A cross from Barkley gave Lukaku a great chance to equalize, but he headed wide. Lukaku then turned Cathcart but the Watford defender was soon back to snuff out the threat. An attempt to break by Capoue was stopped by Coleman who was booked for the foul. Watford’s first substitution saw Paredes replacing the goalscorer, Layun. Anya went on a great run down the wing, but his cross was blocked by Stones. Holebas was booked for taking too long over the resulting throw. When he finally released the ball, it was returned to him and he dribbled into the box but his shot was blocked. The Greek then tried a shot from distance that was punched by Howard as far as Jurado who shot over the bar.

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The bundle after Ighalo’s goal

A cross from Cleverley was met by the head of Kone who directed it just wide. Another Everton cross flew over the heads of the Watford defenders and reached Mirallas who clearly wasn’t expecting the ball, so it bounced off him. Watford’s second substitution saw the tiring Jurado replaced by Ighalo. Watford had had the lead for an hour, but the home side equalized with a lovely strike from Barkley which came after Behrami had tried to play the ball out instead of wellying it. I worried at this point that the home side would take control but the next chance was a Deeney header from a Holebas cross that Howard gathered, although I believe the lino on the opposite side had his flag raised. The final change for the Hornets saw Watson replace Behrami. The Hornets regained the lead on 83 minutes as Ighalo received the ball on the edge of the box and dummied England internationals Stones and Jagielka before coolly finishing past Howard. At this point, Deeney was standing in the box with his fists raised in celebration and the home fans were streaming for the exit. More fool them, as Everton equalized soon after as their substitute, Kone, shot across Gomes into the far corner. Both teams tried to push for the win. First Anya cut inside, but his shot was a bit weak and flew wide. Then Lukaku broke into the Watford box, Nyom got a touch to put him off and his subsequent shot was caught by Gomes. The five minutes of injury time passed without incident and the Hornets left Goodison Park with their first ever point at that venue.

Thanking the fans

Thanking the fans

There was some disappointment among some Watford fans that we had twice surrendered the lead. Others, me included, felt that we would have bitten hands off if offered a draw at the start of the game. We met a number of Toffees fans on our journey back to the city centre who were very complimentary about our performance and scathing of theirs. Most Watford fans were impressed with our strong showing and the quality of our new signings. Quique has promised us a surprise in each game. I am not sure that will be good for my blood pressure or my sanity, but I am intrigued to see how he will set up at home. So far, so good and I am really looking forward to the rest of the season.