Tag Archives: Harry Winks

No Goals, Just Scarves

On Tuesday lunchtime I left work knowing that a waterlogged pitch at Tranmere meant that the game was in doubt.  Unfortunately, I was booked on an early train and was probably just passing through Hemel when I saw the first report of the postponement.  As the first stop for the train was Stafford, I had some time to contemplate whether to turn around but decided to finish the trip, just in case there was a rapid rearrangement.  There wasn’t, so it ended up being a very expensive trip to the cinema (I saw “Knives Out” which was great fun).

Mike and I meeting Aidy Mariappa and Daniel Bachmann

On Wednesday evening (after my return from Liverpool!) I attended an amazing evening at Vicarage Road highlighting the work of the Community Sports and Education Trust.  Instead of talking about their own work, they invited a number of participants to talk about their experiences, interviewed by Emma Saunders, who did a fantastic job.  There was a guy who took part in the Shape Up programme who went from being a 24 stone couch potato to running a half marathon.  A guy with mental health problems who has gained new confidence from the Man Up! events.  A young boy who was being bullied and attended events that allowed him to gain confidence to the extent that he is now a mentor for younger children.  A lad from the NCS who got so much out of it that he is now an advocate encouraging other youngsters to join in.

The star of the show was Geoff, who has attended the Golden Memories project for dementia sufferers, and it has brought a smile back to his face after he and his wife moved to a care home.  His joy at the experience was palpable as he quite rightly said that 2 hours was not enough.

It was lovely to see Rita Taylor there with daughter Karen and granddaughter Rhianna.  Rita attended a Golden Memories session as a guest to share some memories and has returned as a volunteer and can be found making tea for the participants.

Rita and GT

Adrian Mariappa and Adekite Fatuga-Dada talked about their experiences as youngsters at Trust schemes.  It was the first time that Adekite realised that she wasn’t the only girl who played football and allowed her to progress to playing for Watford Ladies.  Daniel Bachmann was there as someone who has attended events as an enthusiastic volunteer, which is great to see.

So much credit has to go to Rob Smith who has worked tirelessly for many years to make the Trust such an amazing success.  The Trust is a charity and self-financing and the work that it does is incredibly valuable for the community.  This evening was a timely reminder of that.

I had a chat with Daniel Bachmann afterwards, who was absolutely lovely, although I was very confused by his Manchester accent (he came to England to play for Stoke when he was 17).  But the little moment that reminded me why I love this club so much was when Aidy Mariappa put the chairs away after the event.  Pampered Premier League footballers?  There are some who are still treasures.

Scarves out for GT in the SEJ Stand

On to the weekend and Saturday lunchtime games are the worst.  I went to the theatre on Friday night (Duchess of Malfi at the Almeida, very good but very bloody), so decided to stay in London to shorten the journey on Saturday morning.  Don had passed on the news that the West Herts was opening early, so I arrived just before 10:30 to find our table already nearly full although there were an unusual number of coffee cups on the table.  I decided that it was late enough for a beer but was glad when Jacque arrived just after me, so I wasn’t the only one with a pint.  We left earlier than usual (persuading Mike that there wasn’t time for another drink) in order to be at the ground in time for the tribute to GT.  Fans had been instructed to bring their scarves and, as I passed the Hornet Shop, I noticed that his statue was suitably attired.

Team news was that the team was unchanged from the Bournemouth game.  So, the starting line-up was Foster; Masina, Cathcart, Dawson, Mariappa; Capoue, Chalobah; Deulofeu, Doucouré, Sarr; Deeney.  By all accounts, Pearson had been happy with his first sight of new signing Ignacio Pussetto, and he was given a place on the bench.

When I took my seat, I asked the guy that sits next to me whether he had a scarf with him (he doesn’t usually wear one).  He didn’t so, as I had last year, I offered him my spare to hold up as the teams came out.  It was a lovely sight with all the stands displaying our brightly coloured scarves.  Rather heart-warming to see a number in the away end hold up theirs and those that had no scarves were applauding enthusiastically.  It was very moving to see.

Chalobah and Deeney

The teams swapped ends before kick-off which tends to elicit a groan from Watford fans as it is perceived as unlucky.  The game kicked off and the Hornets carved out a very early chance as Deulofeu ran the length of the pitch and unleashed a shot that flew just wide.  Soon after, the visitors had the first shot on target, but the effort from Son was easily caught by Foster.  The visitors started to dominate and, from a corner, Lamela’s delivery was punched out by Foster, but the ball found its way back to the Spurs man who shot wide of the far post.  Then a dangerous looking cross from Aurier was headed clear by Cathcart.  Spurs threatened again as a ball across the box reached Son who played it back to Tanganga whose shot from outside the area was straight at Foster.   The first quarter of an hour had been all Spurs, but then the Hornets had a great chance after Doucouré dispossessed a Spurs player on  the wing, advanced and crossed for Sarr who took a touch when he maybe should have just tried a shot as his effort flew high and wide.  The first booking of the game went to Tanganga who took down Sarr after a poor clearance dropped to the Watford man.  The foul meant that the Hornets had a free kick on the edge of the box, but the delivery from Chalobah was poor and flew high and wide of the near post.  Just before the half hour mark, there was a break in the game as the referee walked off the pitch.  I thought that maybe he was injured, but it seems that it was his communication with Stockley Park that was suffering.  It seemed an age before his equipment was repaired, so the fans from all stands amused themselves with a chant of “It’s not football anymore.”

Foster takes a free kick

The game restarted with a chance for Son who tried a shot from the edge of the box to the near post, but Foster made the save.  There then came a flurry of chances for the Hornets.  First Sarr crossed for Deeney whose flick towards goal was blocked.  Then Deulofeu got into the box and hit a shot at the near post but it was deflected into the side netting.  From the corner, Chalobah’s delivery looked to be sneaking in until it was tipped over by Gazzaniga.  The first card for the Hornets was a typical Capoue booking as he was cautioned for a sliding tackle on Lo Celso.  The visitors looked certain to take the lead when Alli played a through ball to Lucas, who had the goal in his sights when Foster came out to make the block.  They had another great opportunity when a long ball found Son in the box, but his volley flew well over the crossbar.  Watford then created a decent chance when Chalobah crossed for Deeney, whose header was on target, but lacked power and was easily caught by Gazzaniga.  There was one last chance in the half as a cross from Sarr was headed clear by a defender, it fell to Capoue on the edge of the box, but he couldn’t get a shot in.  Bizarrely, given how long the referee had spent off the pitch to fix his VAR communication, only two minutes of time were added at the end of the half, which finished goalless.

Gathering in the Spurs box

The guest at half time was Allan Nielsen who had played for both teams.  He talked very fondly of his time working with Graham Taylor.  He also spoke of being overwhelmed by the ovation that the fans gave him at his last game for the club.  It was rather lovely that he had a similar experience on this occasion.

The second half started with a great chance for the Hornets as Sarr crossed for Doucouré at the near post, but he could only find the side netting.  Then there was a terrific chance as Deeney headed the ball down for Sarr, but he shot wide of the near post when he really should have hit the target.  Spurs then threatened with a counterattack, Son crossed for Alli whose header cleared the bar.  At the other end Deeney tried a shot from the edge of the area that was deflected just wide of the goal.  Adam Masina was having another good game in defence and he came to the Hornets’ rescue cutting out a great ball before it reached Son in the box.  Then, suddenly, it all kicked off.  There was some Grade A handbags between Doucouré and Winks before Vertonghen joined in and VAR got very excited about possible violent conduct but, while this message was still on the big screen, the ref had shown the two original combatants a yellow card and indicated that the game should continue.

Doucoure and Masina

Spurs had another chance to take the lead after a great run from Son, but he shot just over the bar.  Then a shot from Lamela was blocked by Dawson and went out for a corner.  It was right in front of us and there was complete bafflement when there was an announcement that VAR was checking for a penalty for an infringement (handball) that nobody had even suspected, the decision (no penalty) came up almost immediately.  From the opposite end of the pitch, Deulofeu’s shot looked like it was going in but had appeared to rebound to safety.  There was much excitement among the home fans when the referee pointed to the spot as the shot had been blocked by the arm of Vertonghen.  The excitement was short-lived as Deeney stepped up to take the spot kick but Gazzaniga went the right way and made the save.  The first substitution was made by the visitors on 72 minutes as Eriksen came on in place of Alli.  At the same time Vicarage Road rose to pay tribute to Graham Taylor.  Scarves were again held aloft, and my neighbour took the other end of mine.  Again, the Spurs fans joined in with applause.  I hope that Rita and Karen sitting in the stands were comforted by the outpouring of love from the crowd.  During the tribute Spurs were attacking at the Rookery end but, thankfully, it came to nothing.  The Hornets had another chance as Deulofeu played the ball across the field to Sarr whose shot was high and wide.

Cathcart, Masina and Deulofeu prepare to meet a corner

Pearson then made his first substitution replacing Chalobah, who left the field to a huge ovation, with Pereyra.  At the same time Fernandes came on for Lo Celos for the visitors.  Lamela had a chance to break the deadlock, but his shot was from a tight angle and he turned it over the bar. At the other end, a powerful shot from Capoue was blocked.  Rather worryingly Sarr went down clutching his hamstring and had to be replaced by new signing Pussetto who came on to make his debut with two minutes left on the clock.  Lamela had another chance to grab the three points with a shot from distance that he curled well wide of the target.  Into injury time and the ball was prodded into the Watford box, there was a scramble to clear it but Lamela looked to have got the crucial touch until new boy Pussetto appeared to clear the ball off the line.  From behind the goal it didn’t look to have crossed the line and the referee waved his ‘watch’ at the protesting Spurs players to indicate that they had not scored.  That was the last action of the game.  It had been a decent goalless draw.  The visitors had started the game strongly with the Hornets sitting very deep, but Watford came back into it and had a couple of decent chances.  Both defences played pretty well, and the forwards from both sides were very wasteful.

Pereyra racing free

It was a happy group that gathered back in the West Herts to follow the 3pm kick-offs and cheer on the teams playing those around us in the table.  I must admit that I was surprised to see the graphic showing the position of the ball relative to the goal line for that chance just at the end.  The ball overlapped the line by 10mm, so Pussetto’s timing was impeccable.

It is hard to fathom that a month ago we despaired of seeing the Hornets win again this season.  It is a measure of the difference that Nigel Pearson has made that I travelled to this game thinking that we could get something out of it and finished the day a little disappointed that we hadn’t taken all three points.  We have some very winnable games coming up, so we need to keep up this momentum.

While all is right with the world on the pitch, this week was special for the off-pitch moments.  Seeing the great work of the Trust and the outpouring of love during the tributes to Graham Taylor reminded me (if a reminder were needed) of what a special man he was.  He has left a legacy at Watford that stretches into the community and for that we will always remember him with love.

VAR Is Not Our Friend

Seeing the new stadium for the first time

Unfortunately, on Friday evening, I turned my ankle walking home from the station.  It was very painful, and I struggled to get home.  On Saturday morning my ankle was swollen and I was finding it difficult to walk, so I had to decide on my plan for the day.  The pub that we were meeting at was a 15 minute walk from the stadium, so I decided that it would be better to go straight to the ground.  I briefly considered missing the match completely, as my hopes were not high.  But the last time I missed a match due to ill health, we beat Chelsea in a terrific game, and this was our first visit to a new stadium, so I decided that I had to go.

I drove to the station for the first time in years and got the train, tube and bus that I needed to get to the stadium.  My journey plan indicated that I would have only a minute’s walk from the bus stop but there were matchday diversions which meant a slow hobble up Tottenham High Road.  The stadium could be seen from a distance and looked very impressive.  Needless to say, I had to walk around the stadium to the away end and climb a flight of steps to the entrance, so was feeling very sorry for myself by the time that I reached the turnstiles.  I had listened to the advice regarding the bag policy and only brought a small drawstring bag.  Thankfully, this passed their inspection and I went through the airport screeners to get in.  I was stopped as my camera was in my pocket and had triggered the alarm, but I was soon allowed to the turnstiles and finally inside the ground.

The rather lovely view of the roof from our seats

Inside, I met up with a lot of familiar faces.  The story of my injury had got around and was met with exactly the level of sympathy that I was expecting (none).  I soon headed for my seat to catch up with the family.  The new stadium is very impressive inside and we had terrific seats.  They have the rail seats that are suitable for safe standing, which was quite a relief as it meant that I had a barrier to lean on during the game.  I did think that the seats were very narrow for a new stadium, but I guess they have to pack the punters in.

Team news was that Quique had made 2 changes from the draw against Sheffield United with Dawson and Chalobah replacing Prödl and Gray.  So, the starting line-up was Foster; Kabasele, Dawson, Cathcart; Holebas, Chalobah, Cleverley, Doucouré, Janmaat; Welbeck, Pereyra.  I had checked the kit that we would be wearing before leaving the house and was a little surprised to find that we were in the navy, which meant that we would be wearing the same colour shorts as Spurs.  It seems that the rules regarding colour clash only apply to shirts and socks, so matching shorts are not considered to be a problem.

Talking of odd colour choices, Alice turned up wearing an orange jumper.  I swear she only does it to upset me!

I failed to get a picture of the goal celebrations due to the arms aloft in front of me, so here are Doucoure and Chalobah

The game started with a setback for the Hornets as Danny Welbeck went down with a hamstring injury.  He was treated for a short time but was unable to continue.  He left the field, to boos from the home fans due to his Arsenal history, and was replaced by Deulofeu.  Rather unbelievably, Watford took the lead after 6 minutes.  Cathcart played a gorgeous cross-field ball to Janmaat, who put in a great cross that Doucouré turned home (although the stadium announcer gave it to Cleverley).  My celebration had to be a little muted as I was incapable of jumping up and down.  I made up for it with extra fist pumping and hugging!  The home side had a chance to hit back almost immediately as Sissoko hit a powerful shot from just outside the area, but it cleared the bar.  The first caution of the game went to Sanchez for a nasty tackle on Pereyra.  There was a shout for a penalty from the home side as Danny Rose tumbled in the box under a challenge from Pereyra.  It was right in front of us and was unconvincing.  The referee and VAR both agreed with my assessment and we played on.  The best chance of the first half for the home side came with a low shot from distance from Dele, but Foster made the save.  At the other end, Doucouré broke into the box and put in a lovely cross, but there was no Watford player there to get on the end of it.  My nerves were tested when a ball came into the Watford box and Dawson dived towards it.  I was fearful of another own goal but, thankfully, Foster made the catch.  I had barely caught my breath when Foster was caught with the ball at his feet, Dele came in to make a challenge, but Ben made a slick turn away from the forward and made the clearance.  Watford had a penalty call as Deulofeu went down in the area under a challenge from Vertonghen.  The referee waved play on and, while Deulofeu protested, the VAR check was performed and confirmed the referee’s decision.  Having seen this on television after the game, Vertonghen slid in and had a couple of chops at Geri before he took him down.  I am baffled that this was considered to be a fair challenge by multiple officials.  At the other end, Spurs had a chance to grab an equaliser before half time as Alderweireld crossed for Moura, but the header flew over the bar.

Holebas cherishing the ball before a throw-in

The half time whistle went to boos from the Spurs fans.  The mood among the travelling Hornets was much better than it has been in recent weeks as it had been a spirited performance with some lovely football being played.

After the half-time break, the Spurs players took to the pitch considerably earlier than the Watford men and had made a substitution bringing Son on for Sanchez.  Given how much trouble we have had from the South Korean in recent seasons, this looked to be bad news for the Hornets.  This feeling was intensified when Son blasted a shot that, thankfully, rebounded off the crossbar and out for a throw-in.  The Hornets had a great chance to increase their lead as Deulofeu was in on goal, but the one time I wanted him to be selfish he decided instead to square for Pereyra, who was being shadowed by Aurier who managed to block the shot conceding a corner that came to nothing.  A terrible attempt at a clearance by Gazzaniga let to the ball looping into the air, but Pereyra was unable to capitalise.  Watford threatened again as Doucouré played in Janmaat who went for goal when maybe he should have passed, his attempt was blocked.  Son had another attempt to equalise, this time a shot from a narrow angle, but Foster was able to make the save.

Cathcart waiting to take a free kick

Another great chance for the Hornets as Pereyra went on a brilliant run before crossing for Deulofeu whose shot was wide of the far post when he really should have hit the target.  Just after the hour mark, Spurs made their second change bringing Lamela on for Moura.  The Hornets had another opportunity to increase their lead when Doucouré picked up a loose ball and shot from the edge of the area, but his effort was just wide of the target.  From the opposite end of the ground, a Spurs equaliser looked imminent as Kane got behind the Watford defence, but Dawson was on hand to make the crucial tackle.  Janmaat had another chance to extend Watford’s lead after he received a pass from Pereyra, but he tried to switch feet before taking the shot and the chance was gone.  That was his last contribution to the game as he was also forced to leave the field with a hamstring injury and was replaced by Femenía.  Spurs also made a change as Winks made way for Ndombele.  Spurs threatened with a cross into the Watford box, but Kabasele was imperious, rising to head it away.  Then a lovely cross from Lamela was met with a shot from Dele, but it was an easy save for Foster.  Watford’s next chance came from a poor clearance by Gazzaniga which was picked up by Doucouré who found Deulofeu, but his run into the box was stopped by a foul from Sissoko, who was booked for the challenge.  Our SLO was less than impressed with the intervention by the Spurs man and let all around him know it.  Geri look the free kick himself.  His delivery was on target but an easy catch for Gazzaniga.

Foster prepares to take a free kick

Rose had another shout for a penalty when he went down under a challenge from Kabasele but, again, the challenge was soft, and the penalty was not given.  Into the last 10 minutes and Pereyra had been struggling for a while and clearly needed to be replaced.  As Quique was not getting the message, he went down with cramp and lay in the box for a while with his leg in the air, as the referee insisted that he left the field.  Eventually, he was replaced by Hughes and left the pitch, but not before he had been booked for time-wasting.  The Spurs equaliser was just heartbreaking.  With four minutes left on the clock, Foster came for a cross, failed to deal with it, it dropped to Dele, who controlled it and turned it into the empty net.  There was a VAR check to see whether there had been an offence committed in the build-up.  The referee signalled that the goal stood, and the players went to prepare for the restart.  Then the big screen indicated that the decision was ‘No Goal’.  There were lots of celebrations around me, but the players were still lined up to kick-off again and, sure enough, a new ‘decision’ appeared on the screen indicating that the goal had been given.  It was an utterly ludicrous situation.  It all got a bit heated after that.  First Rose was booked for a foul on Hughes.  Then Dele was taken down and handbags ensued, which finished with Holebas and Dele both receiving yellow cards.  The resulting free kick was hit straight into the wall.  A number around me were voicing my fear that Spurs would go on to win it, but the closest that they came to a winner was a dangerous cross from Aurier that was cleared by Dawson.  My nerves were in shreds at this point and, when a number of the players collapsed on to the pitch, it took me a while to realise that the final whistle had gone.

The Watford players must have been gutted, but they left the field to warm applause from the travelling fans.

Tom Cleverley just brilliant again

Having heard horror stories about the wait to get into Seven Sisters station after the game, and seen the barriers already in place up the street when I arrived, I decided to join the others for a post-match drink, even if, having driven to the station, I was not able to sample the beer.  It was definitely the right decision as the company was great and we caught up with some other friends that we hadn’t seen in the stadium.  The general consensus was that this had been our best performance of the season.  While Spurs had the lion’s share of the possession, the Watford defence were very well organised and Foster barely had a save to make.  All of the dangerous chances had fallen to the Hornets but, as too often this season, we had been wasteful.  A team with more confidence may have taken a couple of those shots earlier and the result would have been different.  But, in contrast to the games earlier this season, this was a gutsy performance with the players working with and for each other and it was a joy to watch.  While all the players played their part, I have to pick out Cleverley, who was absolutely magnificent yet again.  But the highlight for me was the performance of Doucouré.  He has been a shadow of his former self in most of the games this season, but on Saturday he was working hard, snapping into tackles and then starting moves, the misplaced passes that have been all too frequent this season were not in evidence.  While Spurs are on a terrible run, it is still very pleasing to come away from their ground feeling aggrieved that we only took a point.

Dawson looking unimpressed with the referee after the final whistle

I was home in time for Match of the Day and, for possibly the first time this season, I decided to watch it live.  Now I will start by saying that I was very much against the introduction of VAR.  I didn’t see the need for it and using it in a game that flows made no sense to me. Those who argued for the implementation told me that it would rule out errors.  My argument has always been that many of the decisions in football are subjective and will still be subjective when viewed at Stockley Park.  From the footage on Match of the Day it seemed clear that the challenge on Deulofeu should have resulted in a penalty.  But even worse was the equalising goal.  There appeared to be a push on Kabasele in the build-up and it was clear that Dele controlled the ball using his upper arm.  Spurs fans have argued that the ball hit his shoulder, but the footage also shows the player’s face after he scored the goal and he looked haunted.  He knew that he had controlled it with his arm and was waiting for it to be ruled out.  Those reviewing at Stockley Park would have seen all of this and the conclusion should have been that the goal would not stand.  The decision that was broadcast in the ground was that it was not a goal.  What is still not clear to me is whether they sent through an erroneous decision or whether the referee overruled the VAR official and they kow-towed.  Whichever is the case, the involvement of VAR provoked a lot more anger than would have come following a mistake by a referee.  VAR is supposed to level the playing field, but the current feeling is that it is just enforcing the ‘big club bias.’  The decisions today along with the Newcastle goal that should not have stood, but was not reviewed, are leading Watford fans to conclude that VAR is not our friend.

But I don’t want to finish on that note as, for the first time this season, I am feeling really positive.  If we continue to play as well as we did on Saturday, we won’t be in the relegation zone for long.  This was the first time that we have seen a convincing performance from the whole team.  I hope that we bring that into the Bournemouth game and have Vicarage Road bouncing again.  I will certainly ensure that I rest this week so that my ankle is up to bouncing.

Bemoaning the Return of Son

Take your seats!

This game against Spurs was originally scheduled as a Watford home game, but it was decided to change the September fixture to be played at Vicarage Road in order to give the hosts time to get their ground ready.  So it was with some irritation that this fixture was confirmed as being played at Wembley, which is a terrible venue for a league game.

Our recent pre-match pub of choice was deemed to have gone too up-market, so we met at an alternative venue which was actually equally expensive and didn’t have reindeer on the menu, although it did have a venison vindaloo pie, which went down very well with some in our party.  After a very pleasant meal, we headed for Marylebone to get the train to Wembley and were rather surprised to find that it was far from packed and we were able to secure seats for the short journey with no problems.

During the afternoon before the match, the message had gone out that it was no longer permissible to take rucksacks or laptop bags into the ground and we had been warned to arrive an hour before kick-off in order to give us time to get through security.  Arriving just before 7:30, we had the freedom of Wembley Way and there was no queue to get into the ground, although the warning regarding bags had to be taken seriously as there was a measuring device that was in use to catch out those trying to flout the bag size rules.

Deeney wants the ball

Team news was that Javi had made three changes from the Burnley game with Janmaat, Cathcart and Hughes in for Femenía, Kabasele and Sema.  So the starting line-up was Foster; Janmaat, Cathcart, Mariappa, Holebas; Hughes, Cleverley, Capoue, Pereyra; Deulofeu and Deeney.  With the team announcement comes the shirt colour and I was disappointed to see that the team would be playing in yellow as I only had my green shirt with me.

About 10 minutes before kick-off, there were exhortations over the tannoy and on the screens for fans to “Take your Seat.”  When we entered the arena, we could see why, as the home areas were very sparsely populated indeed.

Prior to kick-off there was a minute’s reflection for the missing Cardiff striker Emiliano Sala and the pilot of the missing aircraft, David Ibbotson.  So very sad.

Holebas and Pereyra line up a free kick

Like most Watford fans, I had been gutted when South Korea were knocked out of the Asian Cup meaning that Son would be available for this fixture.  He certainly showed no sign of jet lag as he made an early run into the Watford box but, with Cathcart in close attendance, the ball ended up in Foster’s hands.  Watford also launched an early attack as Janmaat put in a decent cross and Deeney was just short of providing the finishing touch.  Son again caused concern for the Watford defence with a turn and shot that flew just wide of the far post.  The first on-target effort came as a shot from Eriksen took a nasty double deflection which sent it goalwards, but Foster was alert to the danger and made the save.  Then Eriksen found Son in the box but, as he tried to round the keeper, Foster was able to save at his feet. Watford had a half chance as a shot from Deeney was blocked and fell to Janmaat whose shot was high and wide.  Vertonghen then tried his luck but Foster was quickly out to clear.  At the other end, Deulofeu did really well to make space for himself on the edge of the box but his shot was just wide of the target.  Son threatened again with a curling shot, but Foster was right behind it.  Holebas was the next to try his luck with a shot from distance that was deflected over the bar.

Celebrating Cathcart’s goal

Watford took an unexpected lead as, from a corner, Cathcart rose to head past Lloris.  It all looked a bit scrappy from the other end of the ground, but a goal is a goal and the celebrations were joyous.  Almost immediately, the home side had a chance to break back as Son crossed the ball in front of the Watford goal, but there was no Spurs player on hand to turn it in.  So we reached half time a goal to the good in what had been a pretty poor half of football.

Spurs made a change at the break bringing on Moura for Aurier.  Llorente should have equalised early in the second half as he met a cross from Sissoko with a close range shot, Foster made the block but it rebounded to the Spaniard who should have buried it, but somehow managed to divert the ball over the bar when it would have been easier to hit the target.  At the other end, Deulofeu had a great chance to increase the lead but his shot flew just wide of the far post.  The first substitution came on the hour mark as Success came on for Deulofeu who looked very unhappy at being replaced.  The home side threatened again as a free kick from Eriksen was deflected goalwards and had to be blocked on the line by Foster, Alderweireld played the ball back into the box but Llorente headed wide of the near post.

Success, Mariappa and Cathcart jockeying for position

Gracia made his second substitution replacing Cleverley with Wilmot who was in action almost immediately clearing a shot from Rose off the line.  The second Spurs substitution saw Trippier coming on for Sissoko.  Watford’s first chance of the half came on 70 minutes, with a shot from Deeney that found the side netting.  A dangerous looking break by Moura was stopped by Capoue who was booked for the foul.  Watford had another chance to increase their lead as Deeney headed the ball down to Success but the shot was just wide.  Pochettino made his final change bringing Lamela on for Vertonghen.   With 10 minutes to go, Spurs finally scored an equaliser as Son, who had been a menace all evening, broke into the box and finished past Foster.  Our hopes of holding on for a point were dashed with three minutes to go as Llorente, who had been wasteful all evening headed a cross from Rose back across goal and past Foster into the net.  It was a poor goal to concede, Rose was given far too much space and Foster possibly could have done better, but it would be churlish to criticise him as he had been magnificent all evening.  There were four minutes of added time, but neither side looked likely to score again.

So the whistle went on a defeat that was probably deserved and only really galling as we had held the lead for so long.  It was a poor game, one that won’t live long in the memory.  It has to be said that Spurs are a shadow of the team that they were a couple of seasons ago, they looked very ordinary, with the exception of Son who put in an excellent showing as he always does.  Their stay at Wembley has done them no favours at all and the fact that the crowd was below 30K shows what the fans think of the venue.  I am just happy that I won’t have to go there for another league game.  Watford were not great going forward, thankfully we had goal machine, Cathcart, to save our blushes.  But, there was another decent defensive performance and Ben Foster continues to be magnificent in goal.  At the end of the day, I can only hope that a narrow defeat to Spurs will be considered a disappointing result for some time to come as that will mean that we are a team looking up the table rather than down.

 

Beating Spurs after 30 Years

Capoue hits a shot

After our terrific start to the season, the game against Spurs had to be considered as a free hit and I have to confess that I travelled without either hope or expectation of anything from the game.  The travelling part had challenges with a strike on South West Railways, the closure of Euston and a partial closure of the Metropolitan line.  But, despite my concerns, it turned out to be an easy enough journey and, in contrast to last week, the walk to the West Herts was in blazing sunshine.  When I arrived, the food service had not yet begun, but I put in my order for the jerk chicken.  It took about an hour and a half to arrive, but was well worth the wait.  Last week had been more of a barbecue version, this week it came fresh from the grill with proper jerk seasonings and a good helping of rice and peas.  Just gorgeous.  We noticed that the clock in the club was an hour slow, which helped us with the 4pm kick-off as we just kept to our usual matchday schedule.

Team news was that Gracia had stuck with the same team for the fourth league game in a row, so the starting line-up was Foster; Holebas, Kabasele, Cathcart, Janmaat; Pereyra, Capoue, Doucouré, Hughes; Deeney, Gray.

Cathcart, Deeney and Hughes

Tottenham launched an early attack as Kane found Lucas in the box, but Kabasele continued his great performance from last week with a lovely saving tackle.  With little in the way of action on the field early in the game, the 1881 amused themselves with a chant of “Milton Keynes, you’re having a laugh” in reference to the fact that Spurs have applied to stage our League Cup game at the stadium that must not be mentioned (booooo).  The next chance for the visitors came as Alli got on to the end of a long pass from Alderweireld which he headed over both Foster and the bar.  Then Janmaat crossed for Deeney but, again, the header was over the bar.  Tottenham threatened again as a through ball released Lucas but Kabasele was on hand to disrupt and Foster was able to gather the ball.  There was another chance for the visitors as Foster failed to control a cross from Eriksen, Kabasele’s attempted clearance fell to Lucas but the shot was well wide of the target.  Then a free kick was played back to Eriksen whose through ball was turned just wide by Alli, who was offside anyway.  A corner from Eriksen was headed clear to Davies whose shot flew wide.  Tottenham’s final chance of the half came from a Vertonghen cross that was headed over by Sánchez.  In time added on, Watford finally launched another attack, but Deeney’s shot from distance was weak and easily gathered by Vorm.  So we reached half time with the game goalless due to a decent defensive performance by the Hornets who had restricted the opposition’s chances without posing much of a threat themselves.

Celebrating Deeney’s goal with the camera in the way

The half time interview was with Ben Wilmot, still basking in the glory of his magnificent performance against Reading in midweek.  I look forward to seeing him develop as, at 18, he already appears to have Cathcart levels of assurance, which is a great thing.

The first chance of the second half fell to Eriksen, whose shot just missed the target.  The Dane had another chance soon after, but his shot from distance was easy for Foster.  The first booking of the game went to Capoue for pulling back Vertonghen.  The visitors took the lead in the 53rd minute. It was a scrappy goal that took a deflection off Doucouré and flew past Foster.  There was a certain inevitability to the goal and we settled back to witness the defeat that was sure to come.  But the players were of a completely different mindset and the goal seemed to galvanise them into action.  First Gray hit a powerful shot that was just over the bar.  Then Deeney hit a shot across goal that took a deflection off Vertonghen before coming back off the inside of the post.  So close!  Spurs were rattled and Dembélé went into the referee’s book for pulling down Hughes.  Holebas took the resulting free kick which was met by Deeney who powered the header home to level the game and send the Rookery wild.

Celebrating Cathcart’s goal (with no sign of Cathcart)

Gracia made an immediate substitution bringing Success on for Gray, I have to say that I wasn’t convinced that this was the correct move.  What do I know?  Watford continued to threaten as Janmaat crossed for Pereyra who headed the ball just wide.  Watford’s second goal came from another assist by Holebas, this time from corner and it was Cathcart who rose to head home.  I love Cathcart.  He calmly gets on with his job in defence, never drawing attention to himself until he pops up in the opposition box to put the Hornets into the lead against one of the best teams in the country.  Spurs made their first substitution replacing Alderweireld with Llorente.  They had a decent chance to strike back through Eriksen who tried a shot from distance, but Foster was equal to it.  Into the last five minutes of the game and there was a substitute for each side as Hughes made way for Chalobah, a change that was greeted with loud cheers for both players, and Winks replaced Dembélé for the visitors.  From the Rookery, I was convinced that Spurs had scored from their next attempt, but Kane’s header had flown over the bar and hit the outside of the net.  Each side made a final change with Rose coming on for Davies and Mariappa replacing Pereyra.  In the last minute of time added on, Spurs won a free kick in a dangerous position.  My heart was pounding as it was taken and there were loud cheers as it deflected for a corner.  The cheers were even louder when the corner dropped to Rose and he belted the shot well over the bar.

The return of Chalobah to Vicarage Road

The final whistle was greeted with a roar from all the stands.  Elton and his boys were celebrating in the Upper GT and we were all joining Capoue in a celebratory dance.  Deeney won a well-deserved man of the match award.  It is only a couple of months since a number of Watford fans were saying that he was past his sell-by date.  How wrong they were, we wouldn’t be without him now.  It was a terrific team effort and, based on the second half performance, we thoroughly deserved the win.

As one who was lucky enough to live through the first GT era, I can be a bit blasé about these results, after all I have seen us beat Spurs 5-1 at White Hart Lane.  But reading the reactions of my Watford friends to this result shows how much this means.  Watford are currently joint top of the table with 100% record and looking like a team who will be a tough prospect for anyone this season.

Taylor, Rostron and Cox – the three Captains

It was all smiles as we met up after the game.  But there was only time for a quick drink and then it was to the Palace Theatre for the first Tales from the Vicarage Captains evening.  It was much more low-key than some previous events, but an absolute joy to hear Wilf Rostron speak.  I had heard that he had fallen out of love with football, so it was lovely to hear him speak so warmly of his time at Watford and the way that he, and particularly his wife, Jill, had been welcomed to the club.  Obviously, the sending off that meant he missed the Cup Final came up, but he is philosophical about that now (I am not, angry tears were still pricking my eyes as he spoke).  He looks incredibly fit and said that (at 61) he plays in an over-40s league.  Similarly, Les Taylor says that he achieved all of his footballing dreams at Watford, including leading the team out at Wembley in place of Rostron.  His talk of hitting the Watford Observer clock made me smile as I remembered his shooting exploits.  Neil Cox had a more challenging time, not seeing eye to eye with either GT or Vialli, but he will always be remembered as being the captain that convinced his players to agree to a wage deferral when the club were in trouble.  Graham Simpson did not come out of that one well as he tried to avoid paying the players back the money they were owed.  A reminder of less pleasant times at the club.  As always, it was a wonderful evening that evoked many happy memories.

Jose Holebas, my new hero

Since the Pozzo take-over and the influx of players from all over the World we have often been told by those outside the club that these “foreigners” don’t care about the club or the fans and this is not the Watford that we all grew up with.  On social media on Sunday night, there were two examples that showed that this is far from the truth.  First was a video of Roberto Pereyra meeting a young fan with Down syndrome.  To see Roberto interacting with this youngster brought tears to my eyes.  He may not speak a lot of English, but his actions spoke volumes and the boy was beaming.  Then I saw that young Lexe Allaway had received Jose Holebas’s shirt after the game.  When her Mum was asked how this had come about, it seems that they had met a day before the Palace game and Jose had said he would meet her after that game to give her his shirt. True to his word he met her, but as he had scored from that ‘cross’ he asked Lexe if she minded if he kept the shirt.  Of course, she was more than happy for him to have it after his wonderful goal, and he promised that she could have his shirt the following week.  Her Mum warned her that he may well have forgotten a week later. Instead, true to his word, he waited for her after the match, handed her the shirt and made time to chat to her about her football.  Jose has a (well-deserved) reputation for being a miserable so-and-so, but to show such kindness to a young fan is a measure of the man and he has gone way up in my estimation.

I grew up supporting a wonderful club that gave us many happy memories on the pitch, but was a club where the fans were treated well and appreciated by the players.  I am so delighted that, even though football has changed massively over the past 30 years, the current generation of youngsters are having the same experiences that we did.  Watford truly is a special club.

 

A Decent Point Against Ten Man Spurs

Zeegelaar and Richarlison on the wing

Due to damage to overhead cables on Friday, the West Coast line was disrupted on Saturday.  When I arrived at Euston, the train that I had been aiming to catch had already been cancelled.  At that point I decided to take the Met line to Watford.  As it happened, that meant that I arrived in Watford later than I would have done otherwise, but I did bump into Johnno at Euston Square and gave him the benefit of my travel advice (don’t take the same route as me).

There was a good crowd in the West Herts and the company was made all the more delightful by a good contingent of Norfolk ‘Orns.  A couple of our number had already paid a visit to the Hornet Shop to buy their copies of GT’s autobiography.  I suspect that Kleenex profits will go through the roof as Watford fans read the great man’s words (as interpreted by lovely Lionel Birnie).

On the way down Occupation Road, I bumped into Miles Jacobson, who was taking a break from the Directors’ Box to take his season ticket seat in the SEJ stand.  While we were chatting, I was a little distracted as first Britos and then Chalobah walked past us.  Once inside the ground I had a diversion on the way to my seat as Don had left the West Herts before our resident sweetie man arrived so I was sent to deliver his bag of half-time sweets.  I was hoping, but not expecting, that he would not need something to cheer him up after the first half.

Congratulating Kabasele

Team news was that Silva had made two changes from midweek.  One enforced as Pereyra came in for the injured Hughes, the other was Deeney in for Gray.  So the starting line-up was Gomes; Mariappa, Prödl, Kabasele; Femenía, Cleverley, Doucouré, Zeegelaar; Pereyra, Richarlison; Deeney.

Spurs had the first chance of the game as Trippier delivered a dangerous cross into the Watford box, but a tackle on Kane stopped the shot and caused the Spurs man some pain.  He was off the pitch, but the referee was clearly very worried about his welfare and waited with him until he was fit to continue.  I must admit that I have never seen such concern shown for an injured Watford player.  A cross-field ball from Cleverley looked as though it was going out, but Richarlison did brilliantly to keep it in play.  He advanced towards goal and I was disappointed that he didn’t try a shot, instead playing for the corner.  What do I know?  His decision payed dividends as the delivery from Cleverley was headed home by Kabasele.  Watford had a chance to increase their lead as a ball came in to Richarlison who tried an overhead kick that was blocked.

Femenia launches a long throw

Another chance for the Hornets but, from the other end of the stadium, all I could see was a number of Watford bodies in front of Lloris trying to bundle the ball in, so missed Richarlison being knocked over and the shouts for a penalty from the Family Stand, which were ignored by the referee.  Spurs broke down the other end and Eriksen crossed for Son who had an easy tap in for the equaliser.  The first caution went to Cleverley for a foul on Alli.  There were then chances for both sides, first a free kick from Eriksen that was easily gathered by Gomes, then a much better chance for Watford with a fierce shot from distance from Doucouré that flew just wide of the far post.  The visitors had another chance as a clearance from Deeney fell to Davies on the edge of the box, from where he fired wide of the target.  My heart was in my mouth when Spurs won a free kick in time added on after Prödl fouled Alli.  A voice behind me suggested that it would be directed over the wall.  Thankfully, he was correct as Kane’s delivery flew well over both the wall and the crossbar, so we went into half time with the scores level.

It had been a decent first half.  Spurs had dominated the possession, but a draw was probably about right at this stage.  There was also a decent half-time penalty shoot-out with St Bernadette’s thrashing St Theresa’s with some gorgeous spot kicks.

Zeegelaar prepares for a free kick

The first notable incidents of the second half both involved the referee’s cards.  First Kabasele was booked for a tactical foul on Kane.  Then Davinson Sánchez threw his elbow into Richarlison’s throat just in front of the fourth official.  It was a nasty foul and there was no surprise when a red card was shown, although some of the Spurs players thought that it was worth protesting.  With almost 40 minutes left to play, this was looking very positive for Watford and they should have regained the lead when Zeegelaar put in a lovely cross which was met by the head of Richarlison, but he couldn’t direct the header towards the goal.  A poor corner from Cleverley found its way to Doucouré who unleashed a brilliant shot that hit the inside of the post and rebounded across the goal but, sadly, away from the target.  Each side made a change on 64 minutes with Capoue coming on for Kabasele for the Hornets (to ensure the Belgian didn’t get a second card) and Sissoko on for Eriksen for the visitors.  The second Watford substitution came soon after as Pereyra made way for Carrillo.  There was some concern with 20 minutes to go as Gomes was injured making a save.  He looked in considerable pain but, thankfully, was fit to continue after treatment.

Gathering in the box for a corner

Yellow cards for each side followed with Vertonghen penalised for a foul on Capoue and Zeegelaar for pulling down Alli.  Watford should have taken the lead as a cross from Carrillo was met by the head of Richarlison, but the ball nicked off a Spurs head and flew out for a corner that came to nothing.  The second substitution for Spurs saw Lamela on for Son.  Capoue then tried a shot from distance, but it was straight at Lloris.  There was a final substitution for each side with Winks replacing Alli for the visitors and Gray on for Cleverley for the home side.  The latter change had caused some confusion as Deeney had spotted Gray ready to come on and had handed the captain’s armband to Cleverley before he started walking to the touchline.  He was sent back and Tom returned the armband as he went off.  Carrillo had a moment that summed up his afternoon as he brilliantly won a tackle to advance and then put in a dreadful cross that was easy for Lloris when there were three Watford men in the box to aim at.  In the last minute of time added on, a cross from Richarlison was clearly handled by Dier, but the claims for a penalty by the players and those in the Rookery, who had a perfect view, were waved away.

Cleverley taking a corner

At the final whistle there were boos, but they were directed towards the referee rather than the team.  The post-match interactions between the opposition players, though, were very cordial.  Trippier was being hugged by every Watford player and I don’t think I have ever seen so many warm hugs exchanged between opponents, but maybe I have not been paying attention.

While we really should have had a last minute penalty, a draw was a fair result and I would certainly have taken a point before the game.  To be disappointed with a draw against Tottenham shows how far we have come and it was a very entertaining game.  We have played all of the top six now and have only been outplayed by Manchester City.  It will be a tough trip to Burnley next week, but the Premier League is finally a fun place for Watford fans and that is something to relish.

A Miserable Start to 2017

Amrabat launches a throw-in

Amrabat launches a throw-in

My Watford family suffered a very sad loss this week, so the pre-match gathering was rather subdued.  But as we reminisced about happier times spent with someone who was always the life and soul of a party, there was laughter and glasses were raised to toast a life well lived.

With all the injuries that Watford have suffered recently, there were questions as to who would start and it was no surprise to hear that Doucouré would make his first league start of the season in place of Behrami and that three youngsters had been named on the bench.  There were three other changes to the team with Cathcart in for the suspended Britos, Deeney returning in place of Janmaat and Zúñiga preferred to Ighalo.  By the time the warm up had finished, an injury to Zúñiga meant that Ighalo was restored to the team and Folivi had been added to the substitutes.  The starting line-up was Gomes; Kaboul, Prödl, Cathcart; Amrabat, Doucouré, Capoue, Guedioura, Holebas; Deeney and Ighalo.

Guedioura lines up a free kick

Guedioura lines up a free kick

The first chance of the game fell to Son whose shot from outside the box was saved by Gomes.  There were claims for a penalty as a shot from Erikson hit Capoue’s arm in the Watford box, but it had been a close range strike and was definitely ball to hand.  The first twenty minutes were pretty even and we looked to be in for a quiet afternoon, then the visitors began to get the upper hand.  The first chance fell to former Watford loanee, Rose, who shot well over the bar.  Eriksen was the next to threaten with a shot from wide on the right that flew over the bar.  The visitors came closer to scoring as Guedioura gave the ball away to Son who fed Dele whose shot rebounded off the crossbar.  But it was only a brief stay of execution as Spurs took the lead with the next move as Trippier fed Kane who finished from a tight angle.  The visitors were two up soon after with the same two players combining, this time Kane volleyed home from close range.  Spurs had another great chance from a free kick, but Son’s shot was just wide.  The third goal came just before half time as Kaboul gave the ball away to Dele who finished past Gomes.  The half time whistle was greeted with boos from the home fans.  I didn’t join in, but couldn’t help sharing the sentiment.  The first 20 minutes had been fairly even, but once Spurs had scored, Watford had been dreadful.

Brandon Mason's performance was a lot better than this photo

Brandon Mason’s performance was a lot better than this photo

The second half started disastrously as Kane crossed for Dele who finished with no defence in sight.  At this point two of the guys in front of us left, I doubt they were the only ones.  They actually missed a decent Watford move as Doucouré played a lovely square ball to Deeney, but he was tackled before he could shoot.  Kane found Dele again, but this time the shot was wide of the target.  There was another decent chance for the Hornets to pull one back as Deeney played the ball back to Ighalo, but the Nigerian shot wide of the target.  Just after the hour, Dele was replaced by Winks to a sigh of relief from me at least.  Soon after, Ighalo was tripped in the box, but the referee waved play on.  Watford’s first substitution saw Brandon Mason come on to make his debut in place of Holebas.  At the same time Davies replaced Rose for Tottenham.  The Watford youngster got a great reception and his first action in the game was to put in a nice challenge on Son in the box, coming away with the ball (a rarity on this afternoon).  The next Watford substitution came as Amrabat limped off to be replaced by Sinclair.  Gomes was called into action as he stopped a shot from Son.  There were two final substitutions as Kabasele came on for Capoue and Janssen replaced Kane for the visitors.

The goal celebration tells you all you need to know about the game

The goal celebration tells you all you need to know about the game

Late on, Watford had two decent chances to reduce the deficit.  First a Guedioura free kick was headed back by Kaboul but Lloris claimed the ball.  There had been so little to applaud from the Hornets that this effort was cheered as if it had gone in.  A cross from Deeney was dropped by Lloris under a challenge from Sinclair, the ball was cleared before it trickled into the net, but the whistle had gone for a foul anyway.  Finally there was a great break from Deeney which finished with a decent cross but, sadly, Ighalo wasn’t close enough to connect in the box.  In between these decent moves there was a goalmouth scramble in the Spurs box, I couldn’t tell whether the ball crossed the line, but the referee’s device indicated that it had and the goal was credited to Kaboul.  It was a horrible scrappy effort that summed up the performance of the home side.

When the final whistle went the home stands were virtually empty.  I stayed to the end, but can’t blame anyone who left.  It was a cold, wet afternoon and that has to be the most abject performance I have seen in a long time.  None of our party hung around in the West Herts for a post mortem, so I set off on the journey home alone with my thoughts.  I usually try to find something good to say about the game, and I had plenty of time to come up with something, but I am really struggling with this one.  I have no problem with being beaten by a good team, but Spurs didn’t have to play well to beat us on this afternoon.  They were gifted goals by a team that looked totally uninterested.  The one bright spot was the appearance of Mason, who put in a decent shift when he came on.  The rest were utterly dreadful and, due to this game being moved for television, I have the joyful prospect of a day off work for a trip to Stoke to come this week.  I am not relishing that at all.