Tag Archives: Bernardo Silva

Capitulation at the Etihad

Captain Mariappa

When I sent out the e-mail to our group asking who wanted tickets for this game, I couldn’t help noticing that there were more apologies for absence than usual.  I can’t say that I blamed them as the memory of the cup final is still rather raw and, given our start to the season, this was not a game that I was looking forward to.

I left London at a reasonable time and was joined on the train by Jacque when we reached Milton Keynes.  One topic of discussion was the no bag policy that we had heard about the previous day.  I don’t know how they expect people travelling for over two hours each way not to bring any possessions with them.  Luckily, I was staying overnight in Manchester, so was able to drop my bag (and Jacque’s) off at the hotel.  Despite it being a warm sunny day, I left the hotel carrying a waterproof coat which had pockets filled with the essentials for the game (notebook, pen, camera, purse, lipstick).  We then headed to meet up with the rest of our party for lunch.  On arrival, I was surprised to see Pete there.  I was sure that he had declined the invitation.  Sure enough, he had made a late decision to travel following the tremendous second half against Arsenal last week.

While enjoying lunch, I realised that I had left my distance glasses in my rucksack at the hotel, so I headed back to retrieve them.  Not the smartest thing that I have ever done.  Once they were in another of my pockets, I joined the others at the pub.  We left plenty of time to get to the ground.  The first tram leaving was packed and there was a father with a young boy on his shoulders standing near me.  I heard the father comment, “Maybe you’ll see six goals.”  I couldn’t help but exclaim, “Oh, I do hope not.”  We then had a chat and, as is usually my experience in Manchester, he was lovely.

Dawson, Capoue and Deulofeu preparing for kick-off

On arrival at the ground, we saw Mick, our Police liaison, and I asked how many bags he was looking after.  It seemed that there had been no issues by that point, which was a relief.  It seemed that the stewards were being pragmatic regarding the policy, so some bags did make it into the away end.

Team news was that Quique had made two changes from the Newcastle game with Foulquier and Mariappa in for Gray and Kabasele.  Clearly the selection of Foulqier, for his debut, in place of Gray was not a direct swap, Femenía was pushed forward and Deulofeu was to play alone up front.  So, the starting line-up was Foster; Foulquier, Mariappa, Dawson, Holebas; Doucouré, Capoue; Femenía, Cleverley, Hughes; Deulofeu.  Again. there were some puzzled reactions to the team selection, but the Arsenal game meant that Quique had a lot of brownie points.

When we took our seats in the away end, I noticed that we were very close to the home fans on our left.  I then turned and realised that they were almost as close on the right.  I don’t know how many Watford fans travelled, but it appeared to be a very small group.

Gathering for a rare Watford corner

A couple of seasons ago, a late departure from the pub and a delay on the tram meant that we missed Sterling scoring in the first minute.  On this occasion, we were comfortably in our seats when De Bruyne crossed for David Silva to finish past Foster to open the scoring.  Watford had a chance for an immediate equaliser as Deulofeu ran into the City box, but Ederson saved at his feet.  Deulofeu threatened again, beating Otamendi before dinking a shot that deflected wide off the City keeper.  We weren’t to know it at the time, but that would be pretty much it for our chances.  The second City goal came after 7 minutes.  Mahrez had the ball in the box, he was running out of space and the ball was rolling out for a goal kick, but Foster had committed himself and took him down, so the referee pointed to the spot.  Agüero stepped up to take the spot kick and powered the ball down the middle while Foster dived.  It got even worse on 12 minutes after Doucouré fouled Mahrez on the edge of the box.  The Algerian took the free kick himself, the Watford wall parted, but the ball took a deflection off one of the defenders and beat Foster for City’s third.  At this point I bemoaned the fact that we are not allowed to take hip flasks into football stadia, as I definitely needed a shot of something strong.  The fourth City goal came from a corner which was flicked on to Bernardo Silva who stooped to head home.

Femenia takes a throw-in

We were 5 down after 18 minutes when Agüero put a low cross in for Otamendi to finish at the back post.  It could have been 6 after 25 minutes as Agüero broke forward, but Foster narrowed the angle and the shot was wide of the far post.  When Watford won a free kick after a foul on Cleverley, the travelling Hornets sang “We’ve got the ball.”  Sadly, we didn’t have it for long as Deulofeu’s delivery was straight into the arms of Ederson.  There was an immediate break from the home side, and I feared the worst, but Agüero’s shot took a ricochet off Foster for a corner.  Flores made his first substitution on 33 minutes cutting Foulquier’s debut short as he was replaced by Pereyra.  Fair play to Don Fraser who was still shouting encouragement to the team at this point.  On 38 minutes the Hornets had a rare foray into the City half, Deulofeu’s shot was blocked, the ball fell to Pereyra who could only win a corner that came to nothing.  The home side impressed again as a perfect cross field pass from Fernandinho reached De Bruyne who crossed for Agüero whose header was saved by Foster, Mahrez picked up the loose ball and crossed for Bernardo Silva who headed just wide.  There were three minutes of added time at the end of the half.  Every second was agony, but at least there was no further score.

Abdoulaye Doucoure

At half time, I noted that City had had 6 shots on target and scored 5 of them.  This looked like it could be a record score, although the scoreboard looked as though it couldn’t display double figures, so we could end up back at 0-0.

City made a change at the break bringing Angeliño on for Mendy.  It appeared that the second half would also see a goal in the first minute, but Walker’s shot was high and wide.  Sadly, the sixth goal wasn’t long in coming as, three minutes into the half, the Watford defence went missing yet again and the ball bounced around the Watford box before Bernardo Silva scored his second.  At the break, Pete had come to stand in the row behind us.  I expected the guys who had been there to return, they didn’t and a good few more departed after this goal.  Guardiola made a second substitution as Cancelo replaced Walker.  City should have scored a seventh when they won a free kick in a dangerous position, but the delivery from De Bruyne flew just over the bar.  Flores made his second substitution bringing Sarr on for Hughes.  The Hornets were then shown two yellow cards in quick succession, first Deulofeu was booked after a foul on Rodrigo, then Femenía was cautioned for a foul on Bernardo Silva.

Proof that we had a corner in the second half

The seventh goal came on the hour mark as De Bruyne crossed to the far post and Bernardo Silva finished from close range to seal his hat trick and claim the match ball.  At this point the City fans very reasonably asked, “Why are you still here?”  Pete’s comment was, “For the same reason that you would be.”  City’s final substitution saw Garcia come on for Otamendi.  Mahrez should have scored the 8th with a header that rebounded off the bar.  As City claimed the rebound an exasperated shout of “Get the second ball” came from behind me.  I think that was the least of our problems at this point.  The City fans were having fun with the group to our right taunting the group to our left with, “Where were you when we were sh*t?”  I have to admit that made me smile.  There was a brief moment of quality possession from the Hornets as Sarr found Cleverley who played in Deulofeu but he could only win a corner off the keeper.   Soon after, Gerry was replaced by Gray and you have to ask what Andre had done to deserve being put into the fray.  Just before the substitution the ball had flown into the Watford crowd.  There were shouts of “keep it” and it was a while before it was returned, eliciting boos from the away end.  A chant from the travelling Hornets of “7 nil and you still don’t sing” was countered with “We only sing at 6 nil.”  Ouch!!  De Bruyne, who had been a menace all afternoon, finally got his goal with five minutes left on the clock as his shot from the edge of the area hit the top corner.  He should have had a second soon after as he ran through the Watford defence before shooting just wide.  There was a half chance for a consolation as a Holebas throw was headed goalwards by Gray, but it was an easy catch for Ederson and a goal would have been more than the Hornets deserved.

Etienne Capoue

The final whistle finally went to put us out of our misery.  There were a surprising number of Watford fans still in the ground as the players came over to thank us and the majority of fans applauded them back.  Not for anything impressive in their performance, but more in empathy as that cannot have been any more fun for them than it was for us.  Pete was asked whether he regretted his late decision to attend the game but reasoned that he was much happier to have been there than he would have been if he had listened to it on the radio.

On the way back to the City centre, Ashley was checking the scores in the other games and a City fan asked if he knew the Stevenage score.  It turned out that this lad had managed Stevenage in Football Manager and taken a shine to them.  In a couple of weeks, when City are playing Wolves, he is giving his season ticket to a friend so that he can see Stevenage play in Colchester.  He also consoled us with, “We only scored two more than we put past United.”

As we sat in the pub after the game, it felt more like a support group than anything else.  Between us we could not find any positives to take from the game.  While City had been very good, Watford had been utterly dreadful.  This is a team that has long struggled with confidence and it was clear that it had completely drained from them as soon as the second goal went in.  I still think that we are a much better side than our results indicate, but we need to start showing that against Swansea in midweek and then at Wolves.  Otherwise, I may finally find myself deciding to stay in the pub instead of heading to the ground.

 

Pride Overcomes Heartbreak at Wembley

Before the Cup Final in 1984

I will start by saying that I can’t bring myself to write a full match report.  Everyone who is reading this will have seen the match and I am sure, like me, you don’t want to relive it.  But what I do want to relive is the build-up to the game and the experiences of the day.

My build-up started straight after the semi-final when I received an email from David Hyams suggesting that we create a good luck banner for the final.  The idea was to collect messages from fans from all over the world and display them on a banner to present to the players before the game.  Banners had been produced on three previous occasions, for the 1999, 2006 and 2013 play-off finals.  My involvement in 1999 was limited to having my photo taken with the banner outside Wembley, but I got involved in 2006 and 2013 helping to publicise the initiative and liaising with the club.  On this occasion, we had a great point of initial contact at the club in Dave Messenger, who immediately supported the venture and put us in touch with Hamish in the media team.  Jon Marks then got involved, providing us with a great background photo to use on the banner and arranging for us to go to the ground to present it to the players.

On the big screen looking as nervous as I felt

My next contribution was a couple of weeks before the game when Jon Marks asked if I wanted to be one of the fans featuring in the FA’s pre-match video.  I was incredibly busy at work, so taking a Monday morning off for filming was really not a good idea.  Needless to say, I agreed to do it.  The filming was taking place at 10:30 on a Monday morning.  I arrived at the same time as the Watford Ladies’ captain, Helen Ward.  I was also told that Nigel Gibbs was currently being interviewed and my heart skipped a bit.  I knew that this was something out of the ordinary when we were sent to the players’ lounge in order to meet the make-up artist.  My request to her was to give me some eyebrows and remove one of my chins.  Bless her, she did her best.  Then Helen and I went down to the changing room (thrilling!!) where she was to be filmed.  They sent me back to the lounge so that my spontaneity wasn’t spoilt!  When they finally came to collect me, I was taken out into Occupation Road for the filming.  It took a while to find an angle which allowed them to use the Watford FC on the outside of the SEJ stand as background.  I have to admit that I was a little reserved as it started.  I’m not very good with all the jingoistic stuff, so told them that Roy Moore (who was the next to be filmed) would be great for that element.  Then they asked me to talk about Graham Taylor, Elton John, Heurelheo Gomes, Troy Deeney and generally my love for Watford and there was no stopping me.  I must admit that I often see those pieces and wonder why the participants have no dignity.  On this occasion, dear reader, dignity was completely dispensed with.

Presenting the banner to the players (credit Alan Cozzi)

The league season had finished with a disappointing set of results, but the thing that upset me most was the red card shown to José Holebas.  I remember when Wilf Rostron was sent off at Luton in 1984.  The photo of Wilf’s face when he realised that he would miss the cup final is etched on my memory.  The idea that another player would suffer the same fate was almost too much to take.  I stayed in Watford on the Sunday night after the game, with the idea that I would spend the evening writing my match report.  I was so upset after the game that I couldn’t bring myself even to make a start.  On Monday morning, I drove over to the training ground at London Colney arriving on schedule and was shown to the media room where some of our party were already gathered.  Jon told us the plans for the presentation and then we were taken to the training pitch to wait for the players.  As they started to gather, Javi was introduced to each of us.  When Troy arrived, he recognised me, so said hello and gave me a kiss.  Then David showed him the memento pack that he had made with a replica of the banner and print-out of the messages and the video from the semi-final with the voice over from GT.  Troy could easily have said thanks and dismissed him, but he spent the time listening to David talking about what we had done, and he appeared interested and engaged.  I love him for doing that.  As the players gathered around the banner, it was lovely to see them reading the messages.  The photo with the banner was taken, the players left to start training and we went home.

Fuzz in all her magnificent glory

I had spotted José Holebas at the training ground, but he lurked in the background and looked a bit down, although I am not sure that is unusual.  There had been some discussion amongst the fans there about the appeal going in to the FA and there were varying opinions on what the outcome would be.  I was not hopeful.  I worked from home in the afternoon, which was just as well because, when the news came through that the red card had been rescinded, I found myself sobbing with relief and joy for José.  When we went to Wembley in 1984, my sister took a banner reading “Wilf is Innocent”.  I was so thankful that we wouldn’t have to cross out “Wilf” and write in “José”.

In the week before the game, the club put out a series of videos with the tag line “Imagine if”.  The From the Rookery End guys put out a couple of pre-final podcasts including a great interview with Ben Foster.  Then there were the Hornet Heaven specials.  All of these were wonderful, but the Hornet Heaven episode entitled “35 Years of Hurt” was just incredible.  Added to that we had fans uploading their photos from 1984 and the memories of the game, often involving family members who are no longer with us.  I spent a fortune on tissues this week.

Pre-match, I tried to follow the same pattern as for the semi-final.  I packed my bag with essentials including my scarf with the badge featuring Toddy and Steve Brister and the GT memorial game badge.  I made sure that I took the lucky seashell that Pete Fincham gave me at Woking.  I also added my first scarf, bought in 1979, which accompanied me to Wembley in 1984.  That may have been my mistake.  I took the train into Paddington listening to the latest Hornet Heaven episodes and then took the wrong exit out of the station (as I had previously) and again took an ill-advised detour on the way to the pub.

Fuzz and the family at Wembley (as is my usual practice, my yellow shirt and scarf were donned when I got to my seat)

Richard had booked a table for 11am, when the pub opened, under the assumption that leaving it much later would mean that we would arrive to a packed pub and have to evict those on our table.  I arrived just before the advertised opening time to find the doors open and a couple of guys lurking outside.  I entered a pub that was empty apart from the bar staff who looked a little askance, before breaking out in broad smiles and welcoming me, showing me to our table (the same one as we had for the semi-final) and offering me a drink.  I thought about having a coffee, but that seemed rude, so a pint of Doom Bar it was.  The guys that had been lurking outside also came in and turned out to be the door staff for later in the day, when there was more than one customer.  Thankfully Richard wasn’t far behind me and our party was soon in full swing.  As the “Happy Valley” contingent arrived, I was able to hand out the last of the match tickets that I had purchased (they had better nerves than I did, being able to wait until matchday to receive their tickets).  The ticket handover was accompanied by personalised bracelets that Fuzz had made for all of our party which were very gratefully received.  When Mike arrived, much was made of his winning the Supporter of the Season award.  Then we had lunch and more beer and waited for the designated time to leave the pub as I got more and more nervous.

35 years on, Rose’s daughters accompanied her to Wembley

The journey to Wembley was as simple as last time and we were through the turnstiles very quickly. It has to be said that, despite the strict bag policy, the search was the very definition of cursory.  When we reached the upper level, my family, who had travelled in from Hertfordshire so not joined us in the pub in central London, were all there to greet us.  As was my friend, Farzana.  Now, Fuzz had long talked about she and I dressing as Hornets if we ever went to a cup final.  Thankfully, after years of telling her that I would do nothing of the kind, she had decided to do her own thing.  “Think 70s Elton John.”  The last time that she had promised such a costume, she turned up dressed as a chicken.  This time, the costume was a work of art.  She had added bling and feathers to a yellow mac and it was absolutely gorgeous.  We had photos taken, but then she had to meet her people as so many admired her attire.

The band playing Abide with Me

We were in our seats in plenty of time for the pre-match entertainment, although we had missed the marching band playing Z-cars.  Thankfully, Annie Mac had added it to her play-list and it got an amazing cheer.  She followed with Elton’s “Are you ready for love?” and then “Wonderwall”, which was roundly booed by the Watford fans.  Next up was the FA film.  For Watford, Luther, Gibbsy and Roy Moore said their pieces before my face appeared, to cheers from my family.  I think (hope) that I didn’t make too much of a fool of myself.  This was followed by Abide with Me which always brings memories of Elton’s tears in the stands in 1984.  Then the FA Cup was brought onto the pitch by Tony Book and Luther Blissett.  It was lovely seeing Luther as part of the proceedings, I well remember seeing him walk around the pitch in 84, at the end of his sabbatical in Milan and being so sad that he wasn’t able to play.  At this point, a banner was displayed for each club.  City’s included the dates of their previous cup wins and a picture of Tony Book who had been on the winning team in 1969.  Watford’s showed a shirt with “Ossie 10” on it and “Ossie with us at Wembley” in honour of young Watford fan, Ossie Robinson who died of neuroblastoma in 2017.  That was a lovely gesture by the club.

Troy deep in conversation with Will Hughes

The teams came out and Troy was joined by Elton’s sons, Zachary and Elijah, with their Dad working in Copenhagen so unable to make the game.

The Cup Final team was, as expected, Gomes; Holebas, Mariappa, Cathcart, Femenía; Pereyra, Capoue, Doucouré, Hughes; Deulofeu, Deeney.

At last the game kicked off.  City started brightly but, on 10 minutes, the Hornets broke, Deulofeu played in Pereyra who shot straight at the onrushing Ederson.  There was a shout for a penalty as a shot from Doucouré seemed to hit Kompany on the arm, but it wasn’t given and Abdoulaye was booked for his protest.  City took the lead on 26 minutes.  It looked a bit of a soft goal, Doucouré lost possession, Sterling broke forward, the Watford defence were unable to clear the ball and Silva finished from a tight angle.  The second goal came after a series of corners, finally Silva found Jesus who beat Gomes.  It appeared that Sterling had applied the final touch, but the ball had already crossed the line and the goal was awarded to Jesus.  I was feeling pretty miserable at this point, so I was grateful for a moment that made me smile as Holebas lost the ball in the City half but sprinted back to make a magnificent recovering tackle.  So, we were two goals down at half time.  There were some among our group making positive noises after our comeback in the semi-final, but it was hard to see us coming back from this against City.

Gathering for a corner

The second half started with the ball in the Watford net from a diving header, but Jesus was in an offside position, so the goal was disallowed.  Watford then created a couple of decent chances, but seemed reluctant to take a shot, which is the story of our season.  Ten minutes into the half Guardiola made his first substitution bringing De Bruyne on for Mahrez.  Now that seemed just mean and the feeling was compounded when De Bruyne scored the third after receiving a square ball from Jesus, dribbling past Gomes and finding the net.  At this point “Blue Moon” was ringing out from the City end.  De Bruyne also had a hand in the fourth, playing a through ball for Jesus who was one-on-one with Gomes and made no mistake.  At this point I pleaded “Please make this stop,” before commenting to my sister on how amazing the 1881 in the stand below us were, still singing their hearts out.  I was joining in as much as I could and certainly joined the “One Graham Taylor” chant that came on 72 minutes.  Despite the scoreline, Watford hadn’t given up, and Success and Capoue both created chances but couldn’t get the ball in the net.  City’s fifth came as a low cross from Silva was converted by Sterling.  At this point something remarkable happened, the flags started waving in the Watford end.  First a few and then the stand was a sea of red and yellow, all around us getting to their feet to wave the flags and sing our hearts out for the lads.    The sixth City goal came when a shot from Sterling was turned onto the post by Gomes, but Raheem was there to finish from the rebound.  At this point the guy next to me muttered that was a joint record defeat in the final, not something that I wanted to hear.  Thankfully there were only a couple of minutes of added time.  Stones had a great chance to score a seventh, but Gomes saved with his feet.  The final whistle went to cheers from all corners of the ground.  I was so proud of the Watford fans who were still on their feet waving their flags and applauding their team.  The players must have been devastated but when they came to acknowledge the fans, there was a lovely moment as they stood to applaud a crowd that applauded back in recognition of all that they have done this season.

It must have been a long walk as the team took the steps up to the Royal Box, so it was lovely to see Gino Pozzo greeting Javi and the lads so warmly.  A good number of us waited to applaud the winners as Vincent Kompany lifted the cup.  I must admit that he is a player that I have always liked.  I was interested to see that Guardiola did not go up with the players, he was chatting with the Watford players with Deulofeu (who would have played for him at Barcelona) getting a particularly warm hug.

It took a while to leave the ground.  On the way out, I was delighted to bump into a woman who used to have a season ticket behind us in the Rookery.  She gave it up when she had her first child, which didn’t seem too long ago until she introduced us to her youngest who is now 9 years old.

On the way back to the station, we bumped into Steve Terry who was very chatty and felt that the result was unfair on the lads.

The banner says it all

I headed back to the pub in desperate need of a glass of wine.  I was feeling pretty low and it must have been obvious as Jacque gave me a warm hug saying that she had never seen me look so down after a game.  I must admit that I didn’t expect us to win, but the thrashing was very hard to take.  Mostly for the players who have been magnificent for most of this season and really didn’t deserve to be beaten that badly.  A City fan that we encountered in the pub reflected that they were a good team, but not often that good.  They clearly wanted to finish their season on a high and did so and there was nothing that we could do about it.

As the wine flowed and we reflected on our season, it was time to put the game in some perspective.  The defeat was awful and will hurt for a long time, but it is always the good times that you remember most.  For most of us, the abiding memory of 2013 is that amazing semi-final win against Leicester.  Going back to 1987, the quarter-final win at Arsenal remains one of my most fondly remembered games in the FA Cup.  In years to come, the semi-final against Wolves will be much talked about in a way that the final won’t be.

As I received messages of commiseration today, my response was that it really hurt, but this season has been the best that I have experienced since the glory days of Graham Taylor.  I am so thankful to Gino Pozzo and Scott Duxbury for what they have done for Watford.  In my time following the Hornets, I have seen many highs but also many lows.  I lived through times when I thought that I would no longer have a club to support. These are great times for the club, but we can never take them for granted. That is why I was so proud of the Watford fans yesterday.   To give the team such incredible support when they are being badly beaten is the mark of a true fan in my eyes.  “We’ll support you ever more”, doesn’t mean only when they are winning.  The Watford fans as a whole were amazing and the lovely people that I meet at games, either in the pub beforehand or in the stadium, are a massive part of what makes going to watch Watford special for me.

It has been a tough end to the season, but the fixtures are out on 13th June.  Who knows what joys next season will bring.

Come on you Hornets!!

Controversy at City

Ben Foster takes a free kick

Despite the late kick-off, I left London at the same time as I would have for a 3pm game.  I went straight to the hotel to see if there was a possibility of an early check-in.  As I neared, I spotted a familiar face, so we both checked in and dropped our bags/toothbrush before heading to the pub.  When the details had come through of the proposed pre-match pub, I was slightly put off to find out that it was called the Castle Hotel.  On arrival it was clear that this was far from the hotel bar that I had been expecting, instead it was a proper old-fashioned pub with real ale and a back room that often hosts live music.  Over the next hour or so, our group gathered and occupied a couple of tables in the back room.  All managed to resist the temptation to bang out a tune on the piano that was available.  Just before we left, a couple of guys came in and occupied a table in the corner next to us having first shared the information that John Peel had once interviewed Ian Curtis at that very table.  A little snippet of information that gave the rather shabby looking back room an unlikely glamour.

Having had a couple of drinks there, we moved on to a Thai restaurant in China Town for a very tasty lunch before getting the tram to the stadium. On our last visit the journey to the ground took rather longer than expected due to a long wait for a tram, so on this occasion we gave ourselves plenty of time.  We didn’t want to miss an early goal again!

Miguel Britos back in the side

On the tram, I found myself sitting next to a City fan who, when I expressed my lack of confidence about the game, mentioned that they had a number of injuries.  That didn’t make me feel any better even though Gracia had announced that he now had a fully fit squad to choose from.  When the team news came through, we found that Javi had decided to make the most of that embarrassment of riches by making seven changes, including replacing 3 of the back 4 and leaving Deeney on the bench.  So our starting line-up was Foster; Janmaat, Britos, Kabasele, Masina; Femenía, Cleverley, Capoue, Doucouré, Success; Gray.  I understood the logic of making the changes, especially as we have a tricky FA Cup quarter-final next week, but at that point I suggested that we go back to the pub.

The first event of note in the game was a booking for Walker for a foul on Success.  This was to be a rare occasion in the game when a Watford player had possession.  City had their first attempt on goal soon after as David Silva headed a cross from Mahrez wide of the target.  The first attack for the visitors came as Janmaat played a through ball to Gray, but the ball was easily gathered by Ederson.  City threatened again with a shot from a narrow angle by David Silva that Foster was able to block.

Masina takes a throw-in

The Watford keeper was in action again soon after coming to punch a free kick from Gündogan clear.  The next chance for the home side came from a cross from Zinchenko, a slight deflection prevented it reaching Agüero and it went out for a corner.  The home side should have taken the lead after half an hour when a cross from Bernardo Silva reached Agüero who, with the goal at his mercy, headed just wide of the near post.  They also looked certain to score when Sterling broke into the box with only the keeper to beat, but Janmaat, who had been in pursuit, managed to catch up and frustrate him with a fantastic tackle.  There was a half chance for City as a cross reached David Silva whose header was an easy catch for Foster.  Into time added on at the end of the half, Foster came to claim a speculative shot from Agüero but was only able to put it out for a corner.  The delivery was met by the head of Success, whose clearance dropped to Mahrez, but the shot was just wide of the target.  So, we reached half time with the game goalless.  It had been all City, with the Hornets not mustering a shot on target.  But the defensive efforts of the visitors had been impressive and restricted the chances for the home side.

Deulofeu lines up a free kick

The second half started disastrously for the Hornets.  From the other end of the ground, it appeared that Watford had let in a really soft goal from Sterling, so it was a relief when the lineman’s flag was raised.  But, following protests from the City players, the referee had a very long conversation with the lino before indicating that the goal would stand.  It was a bizarre decision by all accounts and the Watford players were furious, but their protests fell on deaf ears.  I can’t help feeling that their anger at the injustice was a factor in their conceding a second goal a few minutes later, another simple finish for Sterling from a square ball from Mahrez.  A few Watford fans had seen enough at this point and left the stand.  Sterling got his hat trick on the hour mark as he latched on to a through ball from David Silva and chipped the ball over Foster.  This led to more departures including the family who were sitting in front of us.  In my opinion this was poor parenting.  Watching your team get thrashed is character building.  Guardiola clearly thought that Sterling’s work was done as he was replaced by Sané.  I had to laugh at that point, because if I didn’t I feared that I would cry.  Gracia also made a change bringing Deeney and Deulofeu on for Success and Femenía.  This turned out to be an inspired substitution as, with their first touches of the game, Deeney knocked Kompany out of the way to get on the end of a free-kick from Foster that he headed on to Deulofeu who sped upfield and finished past Ederson.  That cheered me up no end.

Masina takes a free kick under the watchful gaze of Cleverley and Janmaat

City tried to restore their three goal advantage, but the shot from Aguero was into Foster’s midriff.   The next to threaten was Bernardo Silva who latched on to a through ball from Mahrez, but Foster was equal to the shot.  Guardiola made his second substitution bringing Jesus on for Agüero.  Gracia’s final change saw Cathcart coming on in place of Britos.  City looked sure to get a fourth goal when Jesus rounded Foster, but Kabasele made a superb tackle to stop him.  The final substitution for the home side came at the start of the additional time as City wonder boy Foden replaced Mahrez.  But there was no further action of note, so the game ended with a two goal defeat for the Hornets, which was more than respectable.

Due to the late kick-off, the post match analysis was brief and occurred as we walked to a music venue near Oxford Road station in order to see a Lebanese band playing songs of protest against human rights issues in relation to women and LGBT folk.  The comments between the songs were so interesting that I was disappointed not to be able to understand the Arabic lyrics.  It was a fabulous end to a day on which the football wasn’t expected to give us much pleasure.

Like the majority of Watford fans, I don’t travel to places like City expecting anything out of the game, so the fact that the home side had the vast majority of the possession and Watford had only the single shot on target came as no surprise.  Unlike the trip to Liverpool, Watford were more effective in defence and, had the referee not interfered, the result may have been more favourable.  But the scoreline was a fair reflection of the game and, given the other results on Saturday, has not adversely affected our position in the table.  So time to forget that one and prepare for the early kick-off next Saturday and the opportunity to reach the FA Cup semi-final.  Palace will be difficult opponents, but they are very beatable so we all need to bring our best game.  If we do, it could be an occasion to savour.  I’m nervous already!

 

Rainbows Under the Lights

The rainbow display in the Rookery (with thanks to Alice Arnold)

A rare midweek game, so I left work earlier than usual and made my way out to Watford and to the West Herts to meet the usual suspects.  Trond had kindly brought sweets and I was just commenting that this would be some compensation as Glenn (our usual sweetie man) wasn’t around when the man himself appeared through the door and filled the table with goodies, so we all left for the game with a bag of treats.  I had a feeling that this would be a day when we would need some sugar to sweeten the blow of the result.  City’s last two visits to Vicarage Road had seen them scoring 6 and 5 goals with no reply.  The pre-match consensus was that anything less than a four goal defeat would be an achievement.

As this was Watford’s “rainbow laces” game in support of LGBT+ inclusion in sport, the 1881 and the Proud Hornets had worked together to put on a rainbow banner display in the Rookery, which was absolutely magnificent.

Team news was that Gracia had made three changes with Capoue (whose ridiculous red card at Leicester was not rescinded), Mariappa and Deulofeu replaced by Chalobah, Kabasele and Deeney.  So the starting line-up was Foster; Holebas, Kabasele, Cathcart, Femenía; Pereyra, Chalobah, Doucouré, Hughes; Success, Deeney.

Deeney sporting the rainbow captain’s armband

City had the first chance of the game with a shot from distance from David Silva that comfortably cleared the bar.  Watford had a much better chance soon after as Deeney found Pereyra, who beat a defender before curling a shot wide of the far post.  City should have taken the lead when a terrible ball from Pereyra was intercepted by Sané, who was into the box and looked sure to score, but Foster reached up and pushed the shot away for a corner which was turned wide by Kompany.  Foster was the hero again soon after as he made a double/triple save before the ball was finally cleared by Femenía.  Ederson was then called into action as Chalobah hit a volley from 25 yards, but it was an easy save for the City keeper.  So we’d reached the half hour mark with no score, a distinct improvement on previous seasons.  That looked likely to change as Jesus dinked into the box but, yet again, Foster came to the rescue blocking the shot.  Watford had a chance to grab an unlikely lead as Doucouré found Deeney with an overhead kick, the Watford captain got his shot away and it looked as though it was going in when Ederson got a foot to it to keep it out.  Just when we thought we may make it to half time with the game goalless, Mahrez crossed for Sané, who chested the ball past Foster to give the visitors the lead.  They threatened again before half time as Mahrez advanced on goal from what appeared to be an offside position, but he shot into the side netting.

Man of the match, Ben Foster

So we’d managed to reach half time with only a single goal separating the teams.  City had been very impressive indeed, but Watford’s defensive efforts had been decent and Foster was putting in a magnificent performance in goal.  Even better, the guy who had taken the seat behind me during the first half, who I had been sure was there to support City, turned out to be a Roma fan just taking in a game, so I didn’t have someone celebrating an opposition goal over my left shoulder.

The visitors were two goals up five minutes into the second half as Jesus played a low cross to Mahrez who turned it past Foster.  I feared that this may start a landslide.  I was wrong.  Watford had to make a substitution before the restart as Hughes, who had been limping, made way for Quina to make his Premier League debut.  Watford looked to break back as Success found Doucouré about 20 yards out, but his shot was blocked.  City had a chance for a third as a shot from Mahrez deflected up and over Foster, but the ball drifted wide.  Watford made a second substitution as Chalobah made way for Deulofeu.  Success had a chance to reduce the deficit with a shot from just outside the area, but it was well over the bar.  There was danger for the Hornets when Deulofeu slipped, allowing City to mount an attack, thankfully the effort from Jesus was wide of the near post.

Quina hoping to take a free kick before Holebas intervened

Watford had a decent chance as Success met a free kick from Holebas with a header, but Ederson was down to save.  City made their first change with quarter of an hour to go, bringing Gundogan on for David Silva.  An interception from Deeney started a lovely move in which he exchanged passes with Pereyra before finding Doucouré whose shot was saved by Ederson.  Watford then made their final substitution, bringing Gray on for Success.  Mahrez should have had a second goal but Foster got a hand to the shot to keep it out.  City made another change replacing Kompany with Otamendi.  Then the unexpected happened.  Deulofeu did really well to dispossess Delph before crossing for Gray who touched the ball on to Doucouré who fluffed his first attempt, but put the rebound past Ederson.  It wasn’t the most elegant of finishes, but it sent the Rookery into raptures and, suddenly, it was game on.  As the Watford fans cheered their team on, they nearly got an unlikely equaliser as a Holebas corner was headed goalwards by Deeney, but Ederson made the save.  The visitors made a final change to waste some time as Laporte came on for Jesus, who went off at a snail’s place to boos from the home fans.  Ederson joined in the time wasting, including leaving the ball on the roof of the net for an age before a Watford man returned it to him.  I am glad to say that he was booked for his trouble.  In time added on, Watford won a succession of corners, Foster came up to join the fray, but the equalizer didn’t come.  There was still some considerable satisfaction at witnessing the relief from the City players and fans when the final whistle went.

Pushing for the win

So, despite the defeat, we left Vicarage Road with smiles on our faces.  There was certainly no disgrace in losing so narrowly to City and the fighting spirit shown by the team was something to be savoured.  There was an irony that, having managed only one shot on target in our past two games, the lads managed seven against a City side who are far and away the best team in the country.  Special mention must go to Ben Foster, who was absolutely superb in goal, and Quina who made a tidy appearance as a substitute.  We can look forward to good things from him in the future.

So on to Everton on Monday, a game that will be dominated by the presence of Marco Silva in the home dugout.  But I do hope that the travelling fans can concentrate on encouraging the players, as Goodison Park is not a happy hunting ground for us and it would be lovely to come away with a result.

No Shame in Defeat at the Etihad

Capoue and Carrillo at the Etihad

When the television schedule was announced for the Christmas period, it was a source of some irritation that, despite the fact that none of our games would be televised, Man City’s game being moved to New Year’s Eve meant that our bank holiday game was now to be played on the evening of the 2nd.  This meant a very brief return to work on Tuesday morning, with just time to wish everyone a happy new year before catching a train to Manchester.  There had been an early indication that the away following would be reduced when I received a set of replacement tickets with a letter explaining that, to maximise attendance, the Watford fans would all be located in the lower tier.  There was a further indication on the day, when the club announced that all of the fans travelling to the game would be given a voucher for £10 towards food and drink on entry to the stadium.

When I arrived at the designated pre-match pub, the Happy Valley Horns were already there in force.  The table next to us was populated with Man City fans and we were a little taken aback to hear a loud cheer from one of them before he exclaimed in triumph that De Bruyne was starting.  Did he really think they needed him?  At this point in the evening, I had started to feel rather ropey and, given the excellent quality of the pie and pint that I had sampled, could only put this down to nerves at what I was about to witness on the football field.  City had put 6 goals past us when we were playing well, so this could prove to be an absolute annihilation.

Doucoure and Wague looking drenched

Apparently I wasn’t the only person of a Watford persuasion who wasn’t feeling at their best on Tuesday evening as Okaka and Cleverley were both missing from the starting XI due to illness, Gray and Capoue were the replacements.  So the starting line-up was Gomes; Janmaat, Wagué, Kabasele, Zeegelaar; Doucouré, Watson; Carrillo, Capoue, Richarlison; Gray.

A late realisation that the clock in the pub was very slow and the group of City fans next to us were not going to the game meant that we left for the ground later than intended.  The persistent rain persuaded us to forego the half hour walk and take a tram but, having just missed one, we arrived at the Etihad very close to kick-off and the detour that we were forced to take to reach the away turnstiles meant that we heard the game kick off while still being searched.  I had just reached the turnstiles when I heard a roar that signalled the opening goal.  As I emerged into the concourse, I was greeted by Dave Messenger, handing out the promised vouchers, who confirmed that the goal that I had missed hadn’t been scored by a Watford player.  When I reached my seat those of our party already in position confirmed that the goal had been scored straight from kick-off and that no Watford player had touched the ball before it hit the net.  Having been treated to a replay at a later point I now know that Sané crossed for Sterling to tap in at the far post.

Janmaat after taking a throw-in

My first view of the game was of all the players still camped in the Watford half and it wasn’t long before City had another decent chance from a Sané cross but, on this occasion, Stones blazed the shot over the bar.  Happily, Watford launched an early attack as Gray latched onto a ball over the top but Ederson smothered the shot.  City threatened again as Sané sent a low cross in front of the goal, but nobody was there to apply the finishing touch.  The second City goal came on 13 minutes as De Bruyne crossed towards Agüero, Kabasele intercepted, but could only turn the ball past Gomes.  At this point the crowd just to my left erupted and I realised quite how few Watford fans were actually in the stadium (588 according to the Watford Police twitter).  The travelling Hornets greeted this new set back with a chant of “We want more vouchers.”  A young lad behind me then tried to set a positive tone with “We’re gonna win 3-2.”  Soon after, City won a free-kick on the edge of the box, and he reconsidered, “We’re gonna win 4-3.”  Thankfully, De Bruyne’s free kick came back off the crossbar and the follow-up header from Stones was caught by Gomes.  The unusual sight of the Watford players in possession was celebrated with “We’ve got the ball.”  Sadly, it wasn’t long before it had to be modified to “We’ve lost the ball.”

Cleverley and Aguero

Watford’s second goal attempt came just before the half hour mark as Janmaat hit a shot from distance well wide of the far post.  This proved to be a good spell for the Hornets as Gray broke forward and called Ederson into action to push his shot around the post.  The rolling banner around the ground was displaying facts relating to the two teams and I really could have done without being informed that City had won the last 7 meetings with an aggregate score of 24-3.  Watford had something to cheer in defence as Wagué pulled off a great saving tackle on Agüero in the Watford box just as he was about to shoot.  Silva was the next to try his luck, but his shot was over the bar.  A dangerous cross from De Bruyne reached Agüero in the box, Gomes fell at his feet to pull off a brave save, but was hurt in the process.  Hearts sank at the thought that he may have to be replaced by Karnezis, but he just needed a breather and was soon back on his feet.  It wasn’t all one-way traffic, though, and the next chance fell to Capoue, who found space for a shot, but it was easily gathered by Ederson.  The home side had another chance to increase their lead soon after with a curling free kick from De Bruyne which flew just wide.  The home side launched one final attack in time added on at the end of the first half as De Bruyne crossed for Agüero but the shot was easily gathered by Gomes.  So we reached half time with City only leading by two goals.  After the way that the game had started, that was a bit of a relief.

By half time I was feeling rather better than I had been at kick-off.  Then the players came out for the second half and I felt distinctly unwell again.  It was clearly the thought of the football that was making me ill.

Gray’s goal celebration was to run back to the centre circle

The first chance of the second half came from the usual source as a cross from De Bruyne was met by the head of Agüero, but his effort was well wide of the target.  City fans were shouting for a penalty when Agüero broke into the box and appeared to be taken down by Wagué, it looked nailed on from our vantage point at the other end, but the referee waved play on.  From a short corner, De Bruyne crossed for Otamendi who should have increased City’s lead but directed his header wide of the target.  Marco Silva made a double substitution just after the hour mark with Watson and Capoue making way for Pereyra and Cleverley, who was roundly booed by the home fans, presumably for his history at United.  City’s third goal came soon after as a cross from De Bruyne was spilled by Gomes and Agüero poked the loose ball home.  I was really fed up at this point and found myself bizarrely muttering abuse at the image of Agüero on the big screen that they used to celebrate the goal.  City also made a couple of changes as, first, Danilo came on for Stones, then Touré replaced Fernandinho.  De Bruyne threatened again, playing a one-two with Sané before taking a shot that was deflected into the side netting.  Thankfully for our goal difference, that was his last action of the game as he was replaced by Bernardo Silva.  I did have to join in the applause as he left the pitch as he was truly excellent.  There was an unexpected treat as Watford pulled a goal back, a cross from Richarlison was punched clear but only as far as Carrillo who crossed back for Gray to finish.  The goal was celebrated with considerably more gusto in the stands than on the pitch.  The final substitution for the Hornets saw Richarlison make way for Sinclair.  Gray had a chance to further reduce the deficit as he received a through ball from Zeegelaar, but he was stretching and poked the ball just wide of the target.  There was one final chance for the home side with a shot from Sterling, but Gomes was equal to it.  In time added on, Pereyra tumbled in the box under a challenge from Otamendi.  There were howls for a penalty from the travelling Hornets, but I must admit that I wouldn’t have given it, so was not surprised when the referee waved play on.

Goalscorer Gray

Given my pessimism prior to kick-off, which had been compounded by the early goal, I was oddly relieved at a 3-1 defeat.  I would have taken that before the game.  There was a feeling that City had taken their foot off the pedal, they certainly were not as relentless as they had been at Vicarage Road.  But the Hornets had given a good account of themselves in the second half and the game had not damaged the goal difference unduly.

At the end of the game, Gomes came over to the away end and gave his shirt to a young fan.  Richarlison also came over, but was very particular about the recipient of his shirt, it turned out to have been presented to his Dad.  At this point I must mention the fans who travelled to the game.  There were not many of us, but those in attendance were singing until the final whistle, so did their team proud.

We retired to the hotel bar for a post-match drink, trying to avoid the highlights of the game that seemed to be showing on a loop on the televisions around the bar.  Our last visit to this hotel had been for a game against United and the bar had been packed with foreign tourists sporting brand spanking new red shirts.  On this occasion, the only City fans were old fellas whose scarves had accompanied them for many a year.  As we relaxed, we reflected on why we travel around the country on days like this when the likelihood of a positive result is so low.  The fear of missing something and the delightful company were both mentioned, but in the end there was no rational explanation, we just do.

Watford Thrashed by Relentless City

Tony Coton and Don Fraser

For the second week running there was a Watford related event on Friday night.  This time it was Tony Coton’s book launch at the Vic.  Due to the fire disrupting trains on the Euston-Watford line, I had opted to travel to Watford on the Met line, so was running later than planned.  The room was packed when I arrived, but I had been saved a seat in a prime position, so was very grateful to my more punctual friends.  The main event had Rich Walker asking Tony a number of questions about his younger days and there were some great stories.  I was highly amused to hear that the only game his Mum ever saw was against Southampton as she loved Kevin Keegan.  It was really lovely to see that the front cover of his book featured Tony in a Watford shirt.  He said that he had insisted on that as it was his happiest time in football.  At the break, Tony went around the room signing everybody’s books.  He was then given some respite as Steve Harrison took the mic.  No interview for Steve, this was stand-up comedy and he was hilarious.  Tom Walley was also in attendance, it was so lovely to see him.  Mick Harford also made a guest appearance, and some brave Watford souls even went over to talk to him!  Hearing Steve Harrison tell Don that he was his hero for following the Hornets all over the place made my heart swell with joy.   It was a top evening. and yet another one that made me so happy and proud to be a Hornet.

Zachary and Elijah Furnish-John among the Watford mascots

After the fun of the night before, Saturday morning came far too soon.  My cousin, Doreen, who was visiting from New Zealand, had decided to join us for the game.  As my niece was heading to university, her season ticket was going spare, so Doreen took her ticket, so at least there was a familiar face in Amelia’s seat.  I had arranged to meet Doreen at the West Herts.  I wasn’t expecting her to be quite so keen, so was a little shocked to get a message while I was still in the hotel to say she had arrived before the doors had opened.  Somehow, I managed to get her and Don to meet so that, when I arrived, they were happily sat at our usual table.  It was a pleasure to introduce her to the pre-match experience and the West Herts crew were their usual delightful selves.

Team news was two changes enforced by injury with Janmaat and Mariappa coming in for Kaboul and Femenía.  So the starting line-up was Gomes; Janmaat, Mariappa, Kabasele, Holebas; Chalobah, Doucouré; Carrillo, Cleverley, Richarlison; Gray.

I had heard that Elton John was at the game and, among the mascots, were his boys, Zachary and Elijah.  A fact that Elton announced in an Instagram posting, as proud as any Watford fan on such a momentous occasion.

Gray, Cleverley and Doucoure wishing they could escape the rain

The game started as it would go on with a series of attacks from the visitors.  A couple of off target efforts were followed by a shot from distance by Fernandinho that Gomes dived to save.  At this point the heavens opened and a number of people (mostly young lads) from the first few rows of the Rookery vacated their seats to take cover further up the stand.  This led us grumpy old folk to mutter about the youth of today and how, in our day, we stood for 90 minutes in torrential rain and liked it!  Back on the pitch, De Bruyne played a one-two with Silva before shooting wide.  Watford finally had a sniff of the City goal but Richarlison’s shot was weak and easily saved.  Doucouré found himself in a great position to open the scoring, but his shot was way off target, his embarrassment slightly tempered as the ball bounced off Kabasele so that it ended up flying not too far wide of the goal.  At the other end, Aguero lifted a shot onto the roof of the net.  Then Sterling broke into the box, but Kabasele made a brilliant tackle to prevent the shot.  There was a brief moment of hope for the Hornets as the ball bounced off Otamendi and it appeared that Gray would break clear, but the ball ran away from him to safety.  City threatened again from a corner which reached Aguero who volleyed wide of the near post.  There was a worrying moment as Janmaat flew to head the ball clear and his head made contact with a City player.  He needed treatment for some time, but he’s hard as nails and was soon back on the pitch.

Janmaat challenges Jesus

Watford had an excellent chance to take the lead as a free-kick from Holebas was met by the head of Richarlison, but his effort flew just wide of the target.  Three minutes later the visitors took the lead from a similar situation as Aguero headed De Bruyne’s delivery past Gomes.  Normal service resumed on the discipline front as Holebas was booked for a late foul on De Bruyne.  City were two up on the half hour.  Silva’s cross should have been stopped before it reached Aguero who had a simple tap in for his brace.  The third goal came on 38 minutes, Watford fans were shouting for a foul in the build-up, that wasn’t given, allowing Aguero to find Jesus who appeared to be offside before he finished past Gomes.  A Watford fan in the Lower GT had had enough of the questionable decisions by the linesman on that side and ran down to the perimeter to tell him exactly what he thought.  A steward came over to have a word, but the bloke finished his rant and returned to his seat with applause ringing in his ears.  A rare moment of pleasure in this game came as the big screen showed Elton in the stands, there was warm applause from the Watford fans, which he acknowledged with a wave and a big smile.  Watford had a chance to break back before half time as a ball was played into the City box but the City keeper, Ederson, arrived before Gray, so we reached the break with a three goal deficit.

Steve Harrison and Tom Walley

The respite of half time was welcome.  Steve Harrison was the guest drawing the 50-50 tickets and spoke glowingly of his friend, Graham Taylor.  Then a nice moment as Dion Pereira and Andrew Eleftheriou were awarded match balls for making their Premier League debuts as players who had come through the Academy.  I do hope we see a lot more of these lads in the future.

After the battering of the first half, it was very gratifying that the first chance of the second half fell to the Hornets as Holebas put in a lovely cross, Gray was unable to connect, but the ball came out to Carrillo who shot just wide.  Watford fans were screaming for a penalty as Chalobah was kicked in the box (that is not a euphemism), but the referee decided that there was no infringement, a decision that young Nathaniel challenged but his arguments were given short shrift.  Watford had another chance from a corner, but Richarlison headed it over the bar.  City’s next chance came from a back heel to David Silva whose shot was tipped over impressively by Gomes.  But the relief was short-lived as the corner to the far post was headed home by Otamendi.  At this point, I groaned, “Please make it stop,” but there was still 25 minutes to go.

Chalobah, Mariappa and Carrillo gather for a corner

There were substitutions for both teams as Jesus and De Bruyne were replaced by Bernardo Silva and Gündoğan for the visitors, Pereyra and Capoue came on for Cleverley and Chalobah for the Hornets.  Watford had a great chance to pull one back as a corner was flicked on to Capoue who headed agonisingly wide.  Marco Silva made his final substitution with 15 minutes to go bringing Deeney on for Gray.  City’s fifth came after a run by Aguero, there was a brief hope that his shot had been cleared off the line by Mariappa, but the referee signalled the goal, Aguero had his hat trick and City were five goals to the good.  At this point, many in the home crowd started streaming out.  My neighbour in the Rookery said we had better get Amelia back from university.  City were not satisfied with only five goals and Sterling had a chance to increase the score but shot just wide.  Fair play to the home fans at this point as a loud chant of “Since I was young ….” emanated from the Rookery, including those around me, who aren’t always the loudest.  It wasn’t going to get any better for the Hornets, Sterling was tripped in the box and the referee pointed to the spot.  Sterling took the penalty himself and made no mistake.  They could have had a seventh in time added on but a great shot from Aguero was met by an equally great save from Gomes.

Holebas delivers a corner

At the end of the game, Silva had a long talk with both the referee and the linesman from the GT side.  The players looked despondent, but Gomes, despite the disappointment of having conceded six goals, still did his usual lap of the pitch acknowledging the crowd.  Doreen was very impressed at this show of character.

It was a sombre group that gathered to drown our sorrows at the West Herts.  Before the game I had said that this one was a free hit, but it is never pleasant to see your team so soundly beaten.  It really should be a joy watching players as good as City’s, but it isn’t when you care so much about the opposition.  There was no anger or bitterness from our crew though.  Sometimes you are beaten by the better team and City were truly remarkable.  Their passing was precise, but it was their breaking at pace that took your breath away.  They were also completely relentless, characterised by the fact that they were still attacking in time added on, despite being six goals ahead.  Contrasts were made with the 5-0 defeat to the same team at the end of last season.  That had been an abject performance by the Hornets, but this was not.  We were well beaten, but the team did try to give it a go.  Watford have improved considerably since last season, but so have City and, on this showing, there will be a few more teams on the end of hidings from them this season.

So we just have to put this one behind us and concentrate on putting in good performances against Swansea and West Brom.  Those are the games from which we need to get points, and I will travel with optimism.  I hope it is not misplaced.