Tag Archives: Alan Pardew

Deeney’s Goal Beats the Baggies

Deeney challenging in the West Brom box

After a week dominated by cold weather and snow disruption, it was a relief to end the week with some football.  Although for that we need to give thanks to the large number of kind souls who were at Vicarage Road early in the morning to help clear snow from the stadium and ensure that the game could be played.  Before 10am there was a notice on social media thanking the volunteers and saying that no more were needed.  Well played Hornets fans.  There was also a request from the 1881 for donations to the local foodbank.  When I arrived with my tins just before midday, there was a nice collection beginning and, at the end of the day, the foodbank thanked the fans with a message that “nearly a quarter of a tonne of food” had been donated.  A tremendous effort.

When I arrived at the West Herts, there were a couple of unfamiliar faces who turned out to be Norwegian friends of Trond.  One of them had been to Kaiserslauten home and away, which were his last Watford games before this one!

Holebas preparing for a free kick

After the unwelcome information midweek regarding the severity of Deulofeu’s injury, it was very disappointing when the team news came through to find that there was no sign of Femenía.  Thankfully a follow-up message said that it was due to sickness rather than injury.  Let us hope that he recovers very soon.  I was greatly cheered by the news that Hughes was fit enough to take a place on the bench.  Gracia’s only change from the Everton game was to replace Deulofeu with Carrillo.  So the starting line-up was Karnezis; Janmaat, Prödl, Mariappa, Holebas; Doucouré, Capoue; Carrillo, Pereyra, Richarlison; Deeney.  Former loanee, Ben Foster started for the visitors, who also had Allan Nyom on the bench.

It looked as though our injury list was to have a further addition when Capoue needed treatment in the second minute but, thankfully, he was soon fit to continue.  There was then some danger for Watford as a series of attempted clearances rebounded to West Brom players before a shot from Krychowiak was blocked by Mariappa, who was making his 250th start in a Watford shirt.  Watford’s first chance came from a Holebas cross, Carrillo’s header was poor, but the ball broke to Pereyra whose shot deflected off Gibbs.  Soon after,

Capoue, Mariappa and Deeney

Mariappa was in action at both ends of the pitch, flicking on a corner that didn’t quite reach Deeney and then clearing Rondón’s cross after Capoue had lost out in midfield.  A lovely attacking move for the Hornets finished as Doucouré found Deeney whose shot looked more like a back pass to Foster.  The first card of the game went to Capoue who was booked for a clumsy collision, which seemed rather harsh.  West Brom had a decent chance to open the scoring but, thankfully, Rondón’s header was wide of the near post.  At this point attention was drawn to an advertising hoarding that appeared to be on fire, much to the amusement of the travelling Baggies who were singing “Watford’s burning down.”  Back on the pitch, Doucouré tried a strike from distance that was blocked.  There was then a great chance for the Hornets as Pereyra broke and found himself in space, he played the ball to Janmaat whose shot was goalbound until Foster stuck out a leg and deflected it wide.  The resultant corner was headed just over the bar by Prödl.  In the last minute of the first half, Holebas was penalised for a challenge on Rondón.  He wasn’t impressed with the decision and let the officials know in no uncertain terms and was very lucky not to talk his way into the referee’s book, in fact he probably would have seen a card had Deeney not manoeuvred him out of earshot.  The free-kick was taken by Brunt and landed on the roof of the net, so the half finished goalless.

Deeney and Okaka challenging

At half time, we were introduced to Lewis Gordon, the latest Academy graduate to sign as a professional.  We also had the rather sorry sight of St Bernadette’s school taking part in the half time shoot out with only 2 of the 5 penalty takers.  At first this appeared to be a ruse as the first penalty was excellent, but it was beginners luck and they were soon knocked out of the competition.

As he approached the goal at the Rookery end for the start of the second half, Ben Foster was greeted with a tremendous reception to which he reacted with applause and by blowing a kiss to the crowd.  How lovely.  Watford had the first chance of the half from a Holebas free kick that Richarlison headed wide.  The young Brazilian had another decent chance soon after, but ran into a crowd of players and lost the ball.  At the other end there was a low shot from Rondón that was easily gathered by Karnezis.  The West Brom man then had an identical chance from the opposite side, he struck this one with more power but, again, Karnezis was equal to it.  Carrillo then broke on a counter attack and crossed for Doucouré who headed the ball down to Richarlison whose overhead kick appeared to be deflected wide by Livermore, but a goal kick was given.  Rondón really should have opened the scoring but, again, directed a header wide of the target.

Celebrating the winner

Watford made their first substitution on 54 minutes as Richarlison made way for Okaka.  Young Ricky was not happy and threw his gloves to the ground as he reached the dugout.  Thank goodness his Uncle Heurelho was there to look after him.  Okaka made an immediate impact playing a lovely through ball for Deeney who, sadly, wasn’t ready for it.  Then Doucouré tried to play in Okaka, but the ball bounced off the Italian and the chance was gone.  Watford were coming closer to breaking the deadlock and the next chance came as a cross from Pereyra reached Carillo whose shot was just over the bar with Foster beaten.  That was the last contribution from the Peruvian who was immediately replaced with Hughes.  We then had the bizarre experience of a player doing the time-wasting trudge off the pitch when there were still 24 minutes to go and he game was goalless.  Even his own fans were booing Carrillo before he reached the dugout.  West Brom had a great chance to take the lead as a cross came in for Rodriguez, but Janmaat made a vital intervention to stop the shot.  Mariappa earned a booking after losing Rondón and then hauling him down to stop his escape.  Watford should have taken the lead with 15 minutes remaining as a corner from Holebas reached Okaka in the box with the goal at his mercy, but his shot was blocked by Gibbs on the line.  The Hornets took the lead in the next move as a mistake in the West Brom midfield gifted Hughes the ball and he played a perfect pass for Deeney to run on to, Foster came out to meet him, but Troy was focussed on the goal and lifted the ball over Foster to send the Rookery wild.  The first substitution for the visitors saw McClean on to replace Krychowiak.

Hughes and Pereyra in the box

Mariappa, who had been tremendous, nearly put the Hornets in trouble with a terrible back pass but Karnezis was off his line to prevent Rondón taking advantage.  West Brom made two late substitutions with Livermore and Rodriguez making way for Field and Burke.  A deep corner from West Broom looked threatening, but Karnezis came confidently to claim the ball.  In time added on there was a decent chance for Hughes to increase Watford’s lead but his shot was deflected to Foster.  Gracia had intended to make a third substitution, bringing Lukebakio on for the final minute or so, when Holebas went down injured, so Britos was brought on to replace the limping Jose.  In the final minute of the game Watford won a free kick and I was baffled when Okaka went over towards the ball, leaving no one in the box, until the ball was played short for him to keep it in the corner until the final whistle went.

It had been another poor game, but another great three points.  On his 250th start, it was rather lovely that Mariappa was given man of the match.  It was also pleasing to see Deeney score his second goal in successive games.  His goals have been few and far between this season, but these were crucial to our survival in this division.  And there was a warm welcome back to Will Hughes, who provided the pass that led to the goal.

This win took us to 9th in the table and really has to mean that we are safe from relegation, which is a bit of a relief as our next two games are against Arsenal and Liverpool, although neither of those clubs are models of consistency, so points against them are not out of the question.

On our way back to the station, we met a group of West Brom fans trying to find their way back to The Flag.  They were very philosophical about our putting the final nail in their coffin which made me even happier that we could look forward to the last few games without stressing about the results.

So Near and Yet So Far

The Watford singing section at Wembley

The Watford singing section at Wembley

I woke up on the day of the semi-final feeling very nervous.  Most weeks I don’t get my hopes up and don’t take defeats too badly as there is always next week, but we have only reached the FA Cup final once in our history so the result of this match mattered ….. a lot.  Getting ready to leave for the game takes on ridiculous levels of obsession with tiny details.  Is this an appropriate top to wear?  Have my Watford socks with the mismatched colours at the top been lucky or unlucky?  Did I start wearing my warm coat before our form dipped?  So many questions with inconclusive answers.  In the end, the most important things were to remember my ticket and my yellow shirt, but the sartorial decisions nagged at me.

As most of our group were not travelling through Watford, we decided to meet in the Marylebone area which began to look like a very bad idea when the tube filled up with Palace fans at Green Park and they all piled off at Baker Street, which was teeming with people dressed in red and blue.  For the second cup game in a row, the choice of pre-match pub was a failure.  This time it was closed completely.  We ended up in a fine dining establishment that was happy to accommodate those who wanted only to drink.  I must say that I consumed what was probably my most expensive pre-match meal ever, but it was delicious.  On the walk to the station, it was disappointing to be taunted by a young child about what happened three years ago.  He was wise to hide behind his father’s legs

Deeney leads the team out at Wembley

Deeney leads the team out at Wembley

A game at Wembley really should end with the presentation of a trophy, I am not a fan of using it as a venue for the semi-finals.  So even entering the ground had a sense of anti-climax.  Earlier in the day, mention had been made of friends who had to miss the game for various reasons and someone expressed the opinion that it wasn’t such a huge deal as, if we lost, you wouldn’t want to have been there and, if we won, there would be another trip to Wembley for the final.

A key question regarding the team selection was the choice of goalkeeper.  I would have picked Gomes, who has been immense this season, but Flores chose to keep faith with Pantilimon who played in the earlier rounds of the cup.  So the starting XI was Pantilimon, Aké, Cathcart, Britos, Nyom, Jurado, Watson, Capoue, Abdi, Deeney and Ighalo.

As we gathered in the concourse before the game, it was lovely to see one of my all-time Watford heroes, Nigel Gibbs, was also in attendance.

Prior to kick-off, there was a great display of red and blue foils in the Palace end,  they do that sort of thing so well, but we are fortunate that a sea of yellow shirt is always striking.

Challenging for a corner

Challenging for a corner

Following complaints about the lack of atmosphere among the Watford fans at the play-off final, a singing section had been designated in the lower tier behind the goal and it was great to see them bouncing early doors.  Sadly Palace took the lead on 6 minutes as a corner was flicked on to the far post where Bolasie headed the ball past Pantilimon.  At that point it already felt as though this was going to be a long afternoon.  But Watford rallied and a nice passing move finished with Jurado trying a shot from distance that was blocked.  Then Ighalo laid the ball off to Deeney who tried a shot more in hope than expectation and it flew well over the bar.  Another nice attacking move saw Jurado find Abdi whose shot was blocked.  During our pre-match discussions, John had commented that our third most prolific goal scorer of the season was ‘OG’ and we nearly benefitted again as Ward almost turned a cross from Nyom past Hennessey but it went just the wrong side of the post.  At the other end a cross from Cabaye was punched clear by Pantilimon.  The same player threatened again with a free-kick that was comfortably caught by the Watford keeper.  Before the half hour mark, Capoue went down with an injury that required a long period of treatment.  He tried to continue, but soon collapsed and had to be taken off on a stretcher, which is always sad to see.

GT in his role of pundit at half time

GT in his role of pundit at half time

Despite it being clear for some time that Capoue would not be able to continue, there was a delay between him being carried off and his replacement taking the field, which was odd as Suárez had pulled on his shirt but remained sitting in the dugout rather than being ready on the sidelines.  Watford continued to attack without really threatening the Palace goal as a Watson free kick reached Deeney who moved it on towards Ighalo but a defender made the block before the Nigerian could reach the ball.  Jurado turned and fired goalwards but, again, it was blocked, this time by Delaney who was knocked to the ground by the force of the shot.  The first caution of the game went to Jurado for a foul on Zaha.  Nyom whipped a lovely cross into the Palace box, but Hennessey caught the ball before Ighalo could get to it.  Watford were lucky not to concede a penalty just before half time as a cross from Zaha hit Ake’s arm but the referee was unsighted and signaled a corner.

So we reached the interval, a goal down.  It was interesting to read my notes again as they indicate that Watford had a lot of the play in the first half and, following the early goal, there had been little threat from Palace.  But the mood among the Watford fans was dark as, despite our possession, we had never looked like scoring.  Our attacks had been ponderous and ineffectual while the Palace wingers, when they did attack, looked very dangerous.  It felt like 2013 all over again.  However, we have had a number of games this season in which we improved considerably after the break and I clung to the hope that this would be one of them.

Celebrating the equalizer

Celebrating the equalizer

Watford made a promising start to the second half with an early chance from a Nyom cross which Deeney headed over the bar under challenge.  But that was followed by a scare at the other end as Bolasie rode a tackle from Britos and it took a good save from Pantilimon to prevent him from increasing the Palace lead.  A Watford free kick was taken short by Abdi to Watson whose shot was deflected off the wall for a corner.  This led to our equalizer as Deeney met Jurado’s delivery to head past Hennessey and send the Watford fans wild.  You could see how much it meant to him as he ran to our corner to celebrate.  All of a sudden both spirits and voices rose among the Watford fans and Flores reacted by replacing Abdi with Guedioura.  Abdi had been wasted out on the wing, so this felt like a positive change.  Sadly, we were only level for six minutes.  Souaré was the first to try to restore the Palace lead with a shot from outside the box that was high and wide.  But the man from Senegal turned provider crossing for Wickham who lost Aké and rose to head home.  Watford tried to strike back again as Guedioura crossed for Ighalo, but the ball flew over his head to Hennessey.  Deeney found himself in space and really should have tried a shot, but hesitated allowing the defence to regroup so he passed to Jurado, who found Suárez, whose shot was blocked.

Watson lines up a free kick

Watson lines up a free kick

Pardew’s first substitution saw Bolasie make way for McArthur.  The big screen announced the substitution and illustrated it with footage of the first goal.  Thanks for that.  Jurado crossed for Deeney, but his header back across goal was easy for Hennessey.  Then a dangerous run by Zaha into the Watford box seemed to spell disaster, but the defence closed him down before he could shoot.  The second substitution for Palace saw Sako come on for Puncheon.  The Hornets had a great chance to equalize as Deeney flicked a header on to Ighalo but the Nigerian’s shot from close range flew over the bar.  Flores made his final change with 7 minutes remaining bringing Anya on for Nyom.  Jurado fashioned another chance as a corner was cleared to him but Hennessey was equal to his shot.  Palace’s final substitution saw Adebayor on for Wickham so, again, we had a replay of a goal plus the prospect of Adebayor scoring against us again.  It was nearly game over as Guedioura gave the ball away to Zaha but, thankfully, he shot into the side netting.  The announcement of five minutes of added time was greeted with cheers and encouragement from the Watford fans and boos from the Palace end.  The first minute of time added on saw Ighalo directing a cross from Jurado out to Guedioura whose shot was agonizingly just wide of the target.  Watford had one final chance as Guedioura tried to find Ighalo in the box, but he was unable to connect and Palace booked their place in the final.

Deeney put in a captain's performance

Deeney put in a captain’s performance

It was a frustrating afternoon.  Palace’s run in the second half of this season has been as poor as ours so this was a very winnable tie but we struggled in the first half with the early goal sapping spirits on and off the pitch.  There was an improved performance in the second period but, apart from a short spell around the time the equalizer was scored, we never looked like winning the game.

The queue to get into the station after the game was immense and slow moving and it took forever to get on a train, which I then had to share with Palace fans as I travelled south.  I put my shirt and scarf away and tried to block out their chat about going to the final, but I was very glad finally to get on my train home.

Generally I try to take positives from games, but it is hard on an afternoon like this.  I can take a defeat if we have given our all and were beaten by a better team, but I came away from Wembley thinking that, given the talent in our squad, we should have done better.  If you had told me in August that we would retain our status in the Premier League and reach the FA Cup semi-final, I would have been thrilled.  But that defeat will hurt for some time.

An Important Win South of the River

One of the lovely catering staff in his Luther t-shirt (picture courtesy of Karoline Hasley)

One of the lovely catering staff in his Luther sweat shirt (picture courtesy of Karoline Hasley)

While getting ready to leave for the match I listened, as I usually do, to the sausage sandwich game on Danny Baker’s show.  On Saturday one of the competitors was representing Watford.  On a match day, something like this suddenly becomes immensely important.  So I listened intently and, thankfully, Watford beat Bath City after extra time.  An omen that all would be fine in the afternoon.

As always, there was a stringent search policy on the way in to the ground although on this occasion I wasn’t asked whether I had any keys on me as I was on a previous visit.  Inside Selhurst Park the catering staff were wearing “Cult heroes” sweat shirts bearing Luther’s picture.  How very wonderful.  There was also a deck at one of the windows just outside the Ladies’ loo which was blasting out music at a ridiculous volume.  I’m too old for that sort of thing.

Team news was that Flores had made four changes from Spurs.  Unsurprisingly, Deeney was restored to the starting line-up.  Also, there was no sign of Jurado which, without having heard the reasoning, tended to indicate an injury.  This meant a first start for Amrabat and I was intrigued to see how he would fit in alongside both Deeney and Ighalo.  The starting line-up was Gomes, Aké, Cathcart, Prödl, Nyom, Capoue, Watson, Behrami, Deeney, Amrabat and Ighalo.  Former Watford loanee, Jordon Mutch, started for Palace and lovely Aidy Mariappa was on the bench.

I am the only person I know that loves going to Selhurst Park.  My reasoning is that there is always a great atmosphere and, in days gone by when our away following was not as it is now, you could choose where to position yourself and I was usually able to join a group standing and singing at the back.  However, the increase in numbers in the travelling support now means that you are stuck with your assigned seat and, when all are standing in front of you, those of us who are on the short side or, even worse, those that struggle to stand are only able to see very small sections of the pitch, which meant that my notes were rather sparse.

Deeney waiting to take the penalty

Deeney waiting to take the penalty

Nothing happened of note in the first quarter of an hour until Capoue played a lovely cross field ball to Aké whose cross was blocked.  As the resulting corner came in, play stopped and most of us in the away end assumed that the home side had been awarded a free kick.  But it soon became apparent that the referee had pointed to the spot and the chants went up for Deeney who stepped up in front of the hostile Holmesdale Road end, sent Hennessey the wrong way and buried the penalty in the corner.  During the goal celebration, someone behind me let off a flare which brings into question the effectiveness of the stringent crowd searches outside the ground.  Palace tried to hit back almost immediately as Cabaye hit a volley from outside the area that Gomes had to turn around the post.  The next goal attempt from the home side was a looping shot that was straight into the arms of Gomes.  Some lovely play from the Hornets came to nothing as a pass from Deeney, intended to release Capoue, was a little too heavy and went out for a throw.  Soon after, Deeney exchanged passes with Ighalo before shooting over the target.  At the other end, a dangerous looking cross from Wickham flew over the head of Dann as Aké challenged.  Watford looked to increase their lead as Deeney found Ighalo whose shot was saved by the feet of Hennessey, but Palace couldn’t clear and, when the ball came back into the box, Amrabat had a shot from close range but, again, the keeper saved.

Capoue giving instructions while Deeney looks on

Capoue giving instructions while Deeney looks on

Watford threatened again as Deeney headed a free kick from Watson on to Ighalo who volleyed over the target.  There was another lovely break from the Hornets, a cross field ball was played to Capoue who played it back inside, but nobody would shoot and, finally, Hennessey gathered.  Deeney was putting in a real captain’s shift and was next to be seen back in defence shepherding a ball in the box back to Gomes.  Unbelievably, the home side were level just before half time.  A throw came into the box and the Watford defence stopped, possibly claiming a goal kick as the ball looked to be going out of play, but it was recovered and played out to Wickham who crossed for Adebayor to head over Gomes.  The goal had come from nothing and it was typical that it came from a player who had been linked with us in the transfer window.

At half time, there was some frustration that we were not leading as we had dominated the half.  It had been a poor half of football, but any quality there was had come from the visitors, the home side had been utterly dreadful.  Given the lack of entertainment on the field, I was rather annoyed that I had reached my seat too late to see the eagle performing prior to the game which is always rather lovely.

Gomes taking a free kick

Gomes taking a free kick

Palace made a substitution at the start of the second half, replacing Wickham with Lee.  The home side made a lively start as Zaha went on a run down the left wing and whipped in a cross that landed in the arms of Gomes.  At the other end, a free kick from Watson towards Deeney was headed clear by Jedinak.  Watford threatened again as Amrabat picked up a misplaced pass and found Deeney, but the pass was a bit short and Troy was unable to get in position to shoot.  Nyom, who was having a terrible game, gave the ball away to Zaha whose cross, thankfully, was cleared.  A dangerous cross from Souaré eluded Gomes, but Cathcart was on hand to clear with some help from the keeper.  Gomes was then called into action twice in quick succession.  First to block a shot from Adebayor, then to pull off a flying save to keep a long range shot from Mutch out of the top corner.  A free kick from Watson bounced off a succession of heads in the box before being cleared.  Then Zaha went on a dangerous counter attack, but this time Nyom was in the right place and headed his cross clear.  At the other end Deeney broke free and exchanged passes with Ighalo before trying a shot that was blocked, his follow-up drifted tamely wide of the post.  Watford’s first substitution came just after the hour mark as Abdi replaced Amrabat, who hadn’t made much of a mark on the game.  Watford had a decent chance to regain the lead as a Watson free kick reached Aké at the far post but he was sliding in to shoot and the ball flew wide.

Watson lining up a free kick

Watson lining up a free kick

Flores’ second substitution saw Capoue make way for Suárez while, for the home side, there was an attacking change as Campbell replaced Mutch.  From a corner, Adebayor threatened the Watford goal again, but this time Gomes pushed the header clear.  At the other end Deeney found Ighalo in the box, he couldn’t shoot so moved it on to Aké whose shot was saved by the sprawling Hennessey.  Deeney’s next attempt on goal was blocked by Ighalo, always a frustrating sight.  The first booking of the game went to Suárez who was cautioned for bringing down Ward.  Palace had a decent chance with a free kick from Lee that Gomes did well to save.  But it was Watford who regained the lead on 82 minutes, as a Watson cross found Deeney at the far post, he took a touch before shooting past Hennessey and provoking mayhem in the away end.  “Trooy Deeney, Watford’s number nine.”  The visitors tried to extend the lead as Abdi looked for Ighalo with a cross, but the Palace defence shut the Nigerian out.  In the last minute of normal time, a corner was cleared to Cabaye on the edge of the box, his powerful shot was pushed onto the post by Gomes and a follow up from Zaha flew harmlessly over the target.  There was shock in the away end when the fourth official indicated 5 minutes of added time.  Where had that come from?  The first chance in injury time came as Adebayor broke forward and shot, but it was easy for Gomes.  At the other end, Abdi combined with Deeney and Ighalo before unleashing a shot that came back off his team mate.

Gathering for a free kick

Gathering for a free kick

Despite it happening directly in front of where I was standing, I didn’t see Souaré’s tackle on Behrami, but it was clear from the reaction of those who could see that it had been a poor challenge and the referee had no hesitation in showing the red card.  So the home side played the last minute of time added on with 10 men.  They had one final chance to draw level as a cross from Zaha was met by the head of Ward, but he directed his header over the bar and the Hornets left South London with all three points.

Palace put in a considerably better performance in the second half, with Zaha giving Nyom a torrid time down the left wing, but the win was probably a fair result and Deeney’s second goal a pleasingly moment of quality to win the game.  Neither Amrabat nor Suárez made much of an impression, with the stand out performances being from old hands Deeney and Gomes with a special mention for Behrami, who continues to impress in the midfield.

When the final whistle went, Pete said, “We’re safe,” and, while that is not mathematically certain, the teams in 17th and 18th are 12 points behind us with a considerably worse goal difference, so it is hard to see them catching us.  Time to concentrate on the cup!!

Palace Victors on The Box

Abdi in action

Abdi in action

We haven’t faced Palace since the play-off final two years ago and there is a lingering resentment that we were mugged that day.  While Palace’s spoiling tactics made for an unpleasant game, too many of our players didn’t turn up and we didn’t really deserve anything out of the match.  In all honesty, I am delighted that we had a couple more seasons in the Championship and were promoted at a time when we were better prepared for survival in the top division.

The late kick off on Sunday ensured that I had time for lunch with my Dad before the game.  Neither roast pork nor a glass of Malbec play any part in my usual pre-match ritual, so maybe what ensued is all my fault.

The usual suspects were gathered in the West Herts when I arrived and there was time for a pint of ale and a resumption of proper pre-match stuff.  While there we were entertained by the sight of Diego Fabbrini scoring for Middlesbrough (he fell over while doing so).  I must admit to having a soft spot for Diego following a sterling performance in a Herts Senior Cup game on a freezing cold night in Royston a couple of years ago, so I was glad to see that he is doing well at the Riverside.

Cathcart and Nyom

Cathcart and Nyom

It was a gorgeous afternoon and as we walked down Occupation Road, it was lovely to see Lloyd Doyley with his son, even if he was wearing a Jeter shirt.  I was (pleasantly) surprised then to see a smiling Matej Vydra, although it is a shame that he is not available for selection.

Team news was that there were no changes from Newcastle so the starting line-up was Gomes, Anya, Prödl, Cathcart, Nyom, Watson, Capoue, Jurado, Deeney, Abdi, Ighalo.  The Palace substitutes included the lovely Adrian Mariappa, whose name was greeted with warm applause from the Hornet faithful.

In his programme notes, Troy Deeney made mention of the sterling efforts of the 1881 and they were on top form pre-match putting on a show for the cameras.  As the teams emerged from the tunnel, the Legends flag was unfurled in the Rookery (or should that be upfurled as it went up the stand and over our heads).  I’m sure it looked amazing from the other stands and on TV.

Anya and Jurado

Anya and Jurado

Watford had a lively start to the game without threatening the Palace goal as a Capoue shot from outside the area and a Prödl header following a corner from Abdi were both wide of the target.  Hennessey’s first involvement came when Anya played the ball out to Deeney but Troy’s shot caused the keeper no problems.  Palace had a great chance to take the lead as Hangeland met a Cabaye free kick with a powerful header that was stopped by a great save from Gomes.  There was then a break in the game while Watson was treated for what appeared to be a dislocated thumb.  While I was concerned because Ben was clearly in a lot of pain, the loud bloke who sits a couple of rows behind me was more interested in speculating on why a penalty hadn’t been awarded, as he’d clearly handled in the box!  Palace threatened again as Cabaye blasted a free kick into the wall, the ball rebounded to Puncheon who shot wide of the target.  At the other end, Jurado played the ball out to Anya who dribbled along the by line before putting in a cross that Ledley headed out for a corner.  A cross from Jurado was then safely headed back to the Palace keeper.  The Hornets had a decent spell of pressure around the Palace box, but the nearest they came to threatening Hennessey was a Nyom shot that was blocked.  On the half hour Jurado found Abdi on the right, his first cross was blocked and came back to him, the second was headed tamely wide by Deeney.  Palace broke again as Sako muscled past Anya on his way towards goal, but his shot was straight at Gomes.  The first booking of the game was earned by Abdi for a late tackle on Bolasie that prompted a chant of “Dirty Northern Bastards” from the away fans.  The resultant free kick from Cabaye flew wide of the far post.  Bolasie, who had caused us problems all half, outpaced the defence to run on to a ball played over the top, Gomes came out to meet him and launched the ball over the SEJ stand to cheers.  Ighalo did really well to battle past a couple of robust challenges before the ball reached Anya by way of Jurado but the cross was cut out by Hangeland before it reached Ighalo who had made a run into the box.  In time added on at the end of the half, Ighalo won a free kick on the edge of the box.  Abdi took the set piece which was deflected for a corner.

Jurado takes a free kick

Jurado takes a free kick

The half ended with both sides having had just a single shot on target.  It had been a disjointed half constantly interrupted by the referee’s whistle as the Palace players tumbled under the slightest challenge.

The best chance of the game so far came at the start of the second half and fell to the home side as Jurado hit the crossbar with a free kick, Deeney met the rebound but headed it over the bar.  Watford put together another good move as Deeney fed Ighalo who chested the ball down to Abdi whose shot was saved.  There was a scare for the Hornets as a free-kick from Sako was deflected just wide of the target.  And another as Gayle bore down on goal, but the attentions of Cathcart ensured that the shot hit the bar and rebounded safely into the arms of Gomes.  Around the hour mark, there was a substitution for each side as Zaha replaced Sako for the visitors and Berghuis came on for Abdi.  The Palace substitution proved to be the decisive one as Zaha fell in the corner of the box under a challenge from Nyom and the referee pointed to the spot.  It was a very soft penalty and one of those that irritates as it was given for an offence that certainly didn’t prevent a goal scoring opportunity.  In the aftermath, Jurado was booked for his protests.  Cabaye stepped up to take the spot kick which went in off the post.  There was a spirited reaction to the goal, both on the pitch and in the stands.  The Rookery were on their feet chanting while Deeney headed the ball down to Ighalo who was tackled before he could shoot.

Gomes with a Watford legend in the background

Gomes with a Watford legend in the background

Watford’s second substitution saw Nyom make way for Aké.  The first booking for the visitors came as Cabaye took down Jurado as he bore down on goal.  Palace threatened to increase their lead as Zaha crossed to the back post where Bolasie headed the ball down to Gayle who shot wide of the target.  A free kick from Puncheon flew over the wall, but was comfortably caught by Gomes.  The Palace midfielder was then booked for sending Watson flying well after the ball had gone.  That was Ben’s last involvement in the game as he was replaced by Ibarbo.  A counter attack from the visitors finished with a shot from Gayle which was well wide and soon after he was replaced by Campbell.  There was a lovely exchange of passes between Ibarbo and Aké on the wing, the ball was crossed for Deeney who headed down to Ighalo but the Nigerian was being wrestled away from the ball which was permitted on this occasion, rather bizarre given the referee’s previous sensitivity to challenges of any kind.  Puncheon threatened with a run along the by line, but Gomes was there to snuff out the danger.  There was a flurry of activity in injury time.  First the ever-threatening Bolasie had a decent chance with another break and a shot that flew just over the bar.  Then Anya crossed for Ibarbo whose shot was turned around for a corner.  Just before the final whistle there was a bit of a scramble in the Palace box, but each of the attempts to shoot was blocked.  There were late shouts for a Watford penalty as Prödl went down in the box, but the referee (correctly) gave the free kick the other way.

Lining up a free kick

Lining up a free kick

It was a disappointing loss, but Pardew had got the tactics right particularly through the Palace wide men who had given Anya and Nyom a torrid time.  One plus point was a considerably improved performance from Jurado who showed what Flores sees in him, although his set pieces still leave something to be desired, but he is not alone in that regard.

As the only game played on Sunday we were, of course, the featured game on Match of the Day.  I wondered whether to bother watching, but was glad that I did as the montage that they showed at the start of the game featuring Blissett, Barnes, Callaghan and co. brought the smile back to my face.  I look back on those glory days with great fondness while being well aware that they must have featured frustrating days like today.  I can’t help wondering which of today’s team will achieve legend status.  Based on performances to date, I feel it will be the majority.